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Paris: Cave a manger / Bar a vins

Onzieme, I made a simple, unscientific comparison between Tain and Gigondas, both of which I mentioned in my comment, for August of 2014, using the month-by-month data of accuweather.com for both locations. That data indicated the average daily highs were virtually identical (Gigondas ahead by the tiniest fraction). Of course if you want to pursue climate empiricism to the Nth degree perhaps your argument can be substantiated. So we won't bore the others, I concede that discussion to you. During my importing days I dealt hardly at all in the north, but certainly I covered a bunch of growers in the south. Eventually I gave up on Châteauneuf (poor rapport price/quality in my view) but I was usually pleased with the Grenache/Syrahs of Vacqueras, Cairanne, Rasteau, etc. When I'm in Paris I tend to drink more Sancerre, Chablis and Pinot Gris than anything else, but for reds I'm focused on Crozes-Hermitage (especially Yann Chave) when I'm not collecting samples from Faugères, my pet appellation of Languedoc. There's syrah in the blend there, too.

Dec 13, 2014
carlosnbud in France

Paris: Cave a manger / Bar a vins

If you compare summer temperatures in Tain l'Hermitage with those in Orange or Gigondas in the south you'll find very little difference. But Syrah obviously does well around Tain (Crozes Hermitage) and the wines are usually less alcoholic
than the Côtes du Rhône. I think the problem may be that growers Parkerized their Grenaches, getting excessively high alcohol. They're trending away from it now. Agree that old-vine Carignan can be wonderful, but not sure I agree re Cinsault. And the washed-out Cinsault rosés are usually dreadful.

Dec 13, 2014
carlosnbud in France

Paris: Cave a manger / Bar a vins

Sal, Le Barav at 6 rue Dupuis has already been mentioned, but do check it out; the relatively new bistro, Le Mary Celese at 1 rue Commines (the chef is Canadian) is big on natural wines; in the Marché des Enfants Rouges (covered market) at 39 rue de Bretagne, the cave à manger Verdant Vins is another natural wine specialist; in the same market is the busy indoor/outdoor L'Estamainet des Enfants Rouge, nice spot for a bite and a glass; there's a tiny new wine bar at 8 rue Picardie (just north of Bretagne) called Monsieur Henry (not Henri)--give it a look; heading south, there are four wine-oriented bistros-cum-wine-bars on rue Vieille du Temple: Les Philosophes, La Petit Fer à Cheval, L'Etoile Manquante and La Belle Hortense (a wine bar-cum-library); these spots are more interested in traditional wines. 'Lot of Wine' at 54 rue de l'Hôtel de Ville is a cave à manger specializing in the wines of the Lot department of southwest France, especially Cahors. Visit Des Bulles Sinon Rien at 16 Rue Elzévir, where Vladimir Gomez has a wonderful selection of Champagnes--he's a native of the Champagne region, speaks English. To learn a bit about the wines of France, visit Chapitre 20 at 8 rue St Paul.
Emmanuel Dupuis is a white wine secialist, but he's also a book-seller with a fanbulous collection of wine books. Hope this helps. Have fun.

Dec 12, 2014
carlosnbud in France

Paris: Cave a manger / Bar a vins

Sal, it would be better idea to learn a bit about French wine regions and appellations before going the natural wine route.
Natural wines can just as easily be funky as good, so you might be in for a disappointment if you feel these are representative.
In most places you'll encounter someone who speaks English, so ask for advice. Look for wines that provide some information on the label. Many natural wines are just 'vin de France,' which tells you nothing. To amplify on what some others have suggested, the cave à manger is often nothing more than a wine shop that offers simple meals--sometimes no more than cheese plates and cold cuts. I've done a great deal of research in this area for a possible book, so give me an idea where you are staying and I'll provide you with recommendations in your immediate neighbourhood, wherever you are in Paris.

Dec 11, 2014
carlosnbud in France

Quick Bite Near Gare de Lyon Station Before Lunch

For wine there's a shop just down the block (26 Blvd. Diderot) called Les Domaines
Qui Montent, and another, Vins et Saveurs, two short blocks up the street at 50 Avenue
Ledru Rollin.

Jan 18, 2012
carlosnbud in France

Quick Bite Near Gare de Lyon Station Before Lunch

Settle in at the brasserie L'Européen, across the street from the station
at the corner of Rue de Lyon and Blvd. Diderot. It's open all day. You
can park your luggage by the door--chances are there will already be
a few bags there. You can check the web site first--easy to find so I'm
not bothering with the link here.

Jan 17, 2012
carlosnbud in France

Wine Tasting/tour/wine buying

Check out this site for wine tastings in English:

http://www.o-chateau.com/

Go see Josh at Spring Boutique on rue de l'Arbre Sec, wine shop and deli, in the 1st. He's an
American and will set you on course.

Before you buy any wine to ship home check out freight costs and duty. Those may
dissuade you.

If you wish to post the address where you're staying I may be able to provide you
with names and addresses of some nearby wine shops where English is spoken.
Many shops have free tastings on Saturdays, often with winemakers.

Jan 14, 2012
carlosnbud in France

Paris in 2 days...wine store in the 10th and one more reservation needed, please!

I think the writer meant Caves Bardou (not Danou). It's at 124 Rue du Faubourg St.-Denis.
If you're close to the canal, on the other side (east) on funky Rue Sainte-Marthe there's
a shop called Le Contre Etiquette at No. 31. This is the best shop in the 10th. On the
other side of Blvd. Magenta check out the St. Quentin covered market. There's a
nice little wine shop/epicerie within, also a bunch of other interesting shops.

Jan 13, 2012
carlosnbud in France