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Is Marcella Hazan's green lasagne bolognese worth it?

Does that attachment work well compared with other specialty rollers? Anybody else have comments on their favorite pasta roller? I have the KA stand mixer with lots of other attachments, but not the pasta one.

Jan 12, 2012
MarkFL in Home Cooking

Is Marcella Hazan's green lasagne bolognese worth it?

Unfortunately, I don't have a pasta roller. Maybe someday I'll try rolling by hand (I do have that left over bolognese ragu in the freezer!), but I haven't done so yet. The pasta sheets from our local market, Mazzaro's in St. Pete, are fairly thin (on the border line of tearing, and even a few holes), but I'm sure they could be thinner. Cooking for 20 people I had plenty to do, so saving a few steps was worth it to me. Certainly better than dried boxed pasta.

Jan 12, 2012
MarkFL in Home Cooking

Is Marcella Hazan's green lasagne bolognese worth it?

Sorry about that. Guess I got a little verbose. I'll break it up in the future. ;)

Jan 12, 2012
MarkFL in Home Cooking

Is Marcella Hazan's green lasagne bolognese worth it?

OK, here's the definitive answer to the original question! Or is it? The unequivocal answer is: it depends. I recently had about 20 people over for dinner and made both, Marcella Hazan's lasagne (albeit, not green), as well as the "World's Best Lasagna" from allrecipes.com (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe-Tools/Pr...), which is a more southern Italian/Americanized version of lasagna, with sausage and beef, garlic, mozzarella, ricotta, parmesan, herbs, tomato paste, etc, etc. I did actually modify Marcella's recipe a little by borrowing a bit from Anna Nanni's recipe (added pork and pancetta, as I have done with previous Bolognese ragus), and quadrupled the recipe so I had plenty for the lasagna and plenty left over for the freezer. I also doubled the Bechamel recipe (although with 1 cup less milk total), which ended up being a little more than I needed. While I did not make the fresh pasta myself, I did get fresh pasta from a local Italian market (one giant pasta sheet per layer!) After everyone tried both lasagnes, the vote was pretty clear -- well, actually it was pretty split. Some people favored the bold flavors of the "World's Best", while others preferred the soft and subtle delicateness of Marcella's recipe. Personally, I liked Marcella's better, although both were terrific (another person brought another lasagne, but it didn't compare to these two). So it depends on your audience and your taste. I liken it this way... if you want a soft and elegant lasagne that you would get in a fine-dining northern (mid?) Italian restaurant, make Marcella's; if you want a lasagne that knocks your socks off with bold flavors like you would get in a typical Italian/American restaurant, make the "World's Best" or something similar. As far as time and effort go, I would say both were pretty similar: with Marcella's you simmer the sauce longer (4 hrs.), but assembly and baking (15 mins.) are very quick; with the "World's Best", the sauce doesn't take as long (2 hrs.), but assembly is more complicated and baking takes about an hour. As a tip provided in the Saveur article in another post, when assembling, I like to put the sauce by itself between layers of pasta, then cheese by itself between layers of pasta, rather than combining the cheese and meat in a single layer. I think it makes for a prettier lasagne, especially if you use the spinach pasta (then you get separate layers of red, white and green (Italian flag)). Also, if you make "World's Best", you will need more pasta than the recipe calls for in order to do more layers (for some reason, it only calls for 2 layers, even though the photo shows about 6 layers -- maybe they forgot the word "repeat"). Also, I cut the sugar in half, and it was still too sweet for me. Taste, before adding too much. You really can't go wrong with either of these recipes. Whatever your taste preference, enjoy!

Jan 11, 2012
MarkFL in Home Cooking