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Twelve days in Ft.Stockton, Texas

No, this isn't a joke. I was out there last month for a business trip, and while this small town should not be considered a culinary mecca, I was able to enjoy some good food. (Though I did cheat on the weekend and ate out of town.)

The first thing I was told was that the high-end eating in this town was a place called K-Bob's Steakhouse. We ended up eating there for three of the dinners. K-Bob's gets 2.9 stars (out of 5) on Google maps with 57 reviews. I had the 6-oz sirloin special (at $11.99) and a New York Strip for a few dollars more. The salad bar was $3 extra with the meal. I rated its value as marginal, but I did order it just to get some greens in me. But the 6 oz Sirloin was an exceptional value. They always cooked it just right, and it was just the right amount of grilled bovine flesh. The garlic mashed potatoes were good, and I was especially impressed with the stringbeans which were crunchy and no overcooked the way they usually are n the South. The house wines were good, too, and were locally made. (more about that later. Who would have thought they made wine in this desolate corner of west Texas?)

One of my colleagues then prevailed on us to try the Pecos Roadhouse out by the Interstate. This was on that basis of a Google maps 3.4 stars out of 14 reviews. I has an excellent chicken fried steak, though I wasn't as impressed with my colleagues ribeye. (But then, it is hard to get a good steak in Texas. I had to go up to Quebec City to get a really fine steak.) I think you're getting the idea that this town is not the place to go if you're a vegetarian or on a diet.

Naturally, this being Texas, we had to try some Mexican. Some our drivers had warned us off some of the places in town, but there were good google maps ratings for Mi Casita (4.7 stars out of fice based on 33 reviews.) Really good basic Mexican food. Even the Mexican food snobs from San Antonio in our group liked it.

Next up was the Sagebrush Cafe. I doesn't show up on Google maps, but the Yelpers seem to like it at 4/5 stars, 31 reviews, and so did I. Had the fried catfish, which was really good. It's basic diner food, and they do breakfast as well, though I didn't get a chance to try that out as we were up and out at 5:30 every morning for work, so I was eating cereal and yogurt in my room washed down by a cup of coffee purchased at the Stripes convenience store on the way out.

Speaking of Stripes convenience stores, they have something called the Laredo Taco Company in each store, and the one on US 285N and I-10 actually had pretty good carne guisada tacos. (2 for $4) I got that for lunch a couple of times. We also went to the KFC on US 285 near I-10 and that was also pretty good.

On Saturday afternoon, I took a drive to Balmorhea and Alpine, and hit Alpine around dinner time. Had a creative cocktail with a carpaccio appetizer. Cucumber-infused vodka with club soda and a jalapeno pepper. I'll need to try it this weekend, my cucumbers from the garden are coming out of my ears Then I went to the Century Bar and Grill at the Holland Hotel. A bit expensive, but they had duck on the menu. After a week of steak, chicken fried steak and Mexican, this was just the thing for me. They didn't quite get the skin crispy, but the meat was nice and juicy.

Sunday, I went up to Carlsbad Caverns, and I had lunch in Carlsbad at BBQ joint called Danny's Place. A little more restaurant than Hil country style meat market, the brisket sandwich was good. Then I drove back down through the Guadalupe Mountains National Park to Van Horn, and had dinner at the Hotel El Capitan, an amazingly well-restored historic hotel from the 1930s. I ordered the "Pistachio Fried steak" which is supposedly their signature dish and is basically a chicken fried steak with pistachio breading and a Jalapeno gravy. I do have a photo. For dessert, a pecan pie with crushed pecan crust. (I actually might have had that in Alpine, my memory is a bit fuzzy, this was a month ago, and I immediately went on another trip. So many meals, it's hard to remember.) All pretty upscale for a town that's even more desolate than Fort Stockton.

Now for the wine. Apparently there's a winery about 20 miles east of Ft. Stockton. (Mesa Vinyards) They make a number of brands, and they have a tasting room in the historic part of town at a place called the Grey Mule Saloon. It's closed on Mondays and Tuesdays, and in addition to being the tasting room it functions like a sort of higher end wine bar for folks who don't want to get drunk with the oil field workers. They have a good deal on the tastings, 5 tastes for $3, and I went twice, so I was able to sample a lot of their wines. While this isn't a grand cru of the Medoc, I was pleasantly surprised that pretty much every wine I tried was decently drinkable, and some were pretty good. I I hadn't been flying home, I might have bought a few bottles.

The trip shows that one can find decent food almost anywhere if you look hard enough.

Aug 19, 2015
ConsApi in Texas
2

Upper Valley (VT/NH) on a Sunday evening

We're spending the night at the Coolidge Hotel in White River Junction. We'll have a car, so we can drive some, but not into long road trips for food, as we'll have been on the road all day.

It's been a few years since I've stayed in the area, and it seems that the last comprehensive post on the area in this board was in 2012. We drove through last year at lunchtime and tried the Tip Top, but it was closed. I am a little embarrassed to admit that we ended up at Friendly's in West Lebanon.

What's the current status? We're looking for a place with vegetarian/pescatarian (fin fish only)and gluten free options. Oh, and we'll be in Sunday evening, so the Tip Top is not an option.

Jun 22, 2015
ConsApi in Northern New England

Apparently there's no food in Farmington ME...

Oh, and I was once passing through and stopped at the Harvest House (http://www.harvesthouserestaurant.com... - "seafood steak-pasta") and had a really good lobster roll. I don't think they serve it every night, otherwise it's decent country cooking.) It's on ME 4/US2 a little south of the Hannaford Market.

Jun 22, 2015
ConsApi in Northern New England

Apparently there's no food in Farmington ME...

If you're going to buy cook food, there's a large Hannaford supermarket on ME rt 4 just west of town. There's also a WalMart, FWIW. So you won't be restricted to hot dogs (and I think the Hannaford stocks Hebrew National hot dogs if you are going that route.)

Jun 22, 2015
ConsApi in Northern New England

Recent Harraseeket Lunch experiences?

I was there last year. It's a bit pricey, but a very scenic setting. You should know that you have to order the steamed lobsters/clams, etc. from a separate window in the back, by the lobster pound, whereas all the other stuff, the fried clams, fish, drinks, desserts, etc. are ordered in the front. So if you want a lobster roll and steamers, like I did, it took some juggling and listening for your order to come up in two places. As I recall, they only take cash, but they have an ATM on site It can also get pretty busy, and the parking lot is limited, so I would suggest arriving at 11:30 - 11:45 or so.

As for the food, I thought it was pretty good. I already had my steamed lobster from a shack on the beach in New Hampshire, so I went for the lobster roll and steamers, which were both tasty. The next week, I was back in Freeport with time to kill before my family flew into town, so I went back and got the fried clam platter. They were really good (and expensive), but I think the portion size was too big for me, as my acid reflux flared up. I quick trip to the Rite-Aid and a roll of Tums took care of that, though.

I'm heading up there in August, and I may go back for the fried clams, but get them in the appetizer size. Or else I'll get a lobster roll. Decisions, decisions.

Jun 22, 2015
ConsApi in Northern New England

Two days in Quebec City (and lunch in the Eastern Townships)

We're planning a trip to Quebec City in August, and I'm going to make reservations this time. (We visited 7 years ago with no reservations, and we had a hell of a time finding places for dinner.) I'd like some suggestions -- 2-3 lunches and 2 dinners (we can make breakfast where we're staying.) We have one member of our party who has some dietary restrictions; she's vegetarian/pescatarian (fin fish only), and she's avoiding gluten, though she doesn't have celiac disease. Also, corn (maize) and soy disagree with her system, which drives us crazy when we start looking for gluten free stuff. What's the availability of gluten-free stuff in the supermarkets.

Our criteria are these:
*Local or classic French cuisine (or places with other cuisines that are truly unique).
*Price range "$$" or less (say $20 main course tops, but suggestions for splurges or higher end places with less expensive lunch menus are welcome. And, of course, fantastic bargains would interest us as well.)
*Tourist casual for dress (we're not bringing coats and ties and fancy frocks for a vacation that, outside of out Quebec trip will be in a backwoods cabin.) I'm thinking khakis/slacks and collared sport shirt.

We'll be coming up through Vermont, entering Canada at Stanstead, passing through the Magog and Sherbrooke vicinity around lunchtime. Any suggestions for good lunch on the road in those areas is appreciated. I've heard that Sherbrooke is on the edge of the "poutine heartland," so maybe that's the time to sample that local dish.

Any recommendations for wine/cheese/cider producers on the road between Stanstead and Quebec, and our return trip to the States via the Beauce would appreciated. Also, any cheese shops in Quebec where we can get unpasteurized soft cheeses (e.g., Epoisses or similar Canadian varieties) that are not sold in the USA. And any other unique food/drink stuffs that we should be looking for.

Thanks in advance. We'll report back on our experiences.

Please share your recommendations for restaurants near Baltimore Inner Harbor or Roland Park neighborhoods

You could try Akbar on Charles St, in Mt. Vernon (a short walk from the Inner Harbor, or you can take the free circulator bus). Also a couple of other Indian restaurants in that area, but Akbar has been around the longest, and it's our go-to place for Indian food.

Downtown Long Beach

My business is taking me to Long Beach. I'm staying at the Renaissance Hotel on Ocean Blvd. I won't have a car, and my research indicates that it takes the Blue Line an hour to get to LA. I didn't check local bus routes or tax fares, however.

I'm looking for some nice places to eat at least 3 dinners. (one dinner is being provided by the conference.) My per-diem allowance for meals is $71, though they will be taking at least $20 off on the days the conference feeds me breakfast and lunch. That means I'm looking for something in the range of $50 for Chow worthy food of almost any cuisine, but especially something that might be unique to California.

Also, any decent places for breakfast and lunch would be appreciated, too.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

Mar 19, 2015
ConsApi in Los Angeles Area

One night in Santa Fe

Oh, and I should add that we may hang around Santa Fe the next morning to see some of the sights, and we would want to find a good place for lunch, either in the city, or on the road between Santa Fe and Taos.

Also, we're renting a house with a kitchen in Taos. What are the best food markets in the area? Especially those that stock local specialties, and such.

Jan 25, 2015
ConsApi in Southwest

One night in Santa Fe

I'm traveling with some friends to go skiing in Taos next weekend, and we are spending a night in Santa Fe before we drive north. We'll be staying near the Plaza downtown. I'm interested in southwestern cuisine, not too fancy (maybe a $15-20 or less price point for entrees.) Oh, and we'll be in Saturday night, but we're not sure when we'll be settled, so some place that doesn't require reservations would be best. We will have a car. Any suggestions are appreciated.

Jan 25, 2015
ConsApi in Southwest

Lunch near Baltimore City courthouse

I ended up doing the lunch buffet at Lumbini Restaurant 322 N. Charles St, I was actually looking for Maisy's, but it didn't seem open, and I did have to be back by a certain time. It was actually a pretty good Indian buffet, focused mostly on vegetarian stuff, but a couple of chicken dishes, too,

Lunch near Baltimore City courthouse

I have jury duty!

This means that as a reward for being bored to tears sitting and waiting for a trial lawyer to look me over and excuse me from serving on a jury, I will be given $15 in cash and a little over an hour during the middle of the day to prowl the streets in the vicinity of the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse (roughly St. Paul and Lexington) in search of lunch. Usually when this happens my search ends up not finding anything good and quick. Sometimes, in fact, it just ends up a Harborplace. The fast food offerings leave something to be desired, but at least the view is nice.

But I would really like to find some decent lunch food. I'm not picky, as long is it's relatively cheap, fast, and not too messy. (I will be wearing a tie.)

My research on this board shows that the last long dicussion of downtown Baltimore lunch options was in 2002 or so. Maybe its time for an update. I'd appreciate it.

Portland -- alone and with the family

I would like some recommendations for dining in Portland, as I'll be heading there later in July.

The first suggestions I'd like are for a good chow-worthy place for the solo diner. Last year, I was in the Old Port on a Saturday night, not a particularly good time to get good service if you're by yourself. Some places will serve the full menu at the bar, which I've found can work well. As for cuisine, I'm up for anything as long as it's good quality, though local seafood would be nice, too. Also, I would like to know of good bars for cocktails and general hanging out with a more mature clientele.

I also need to find a new place for Sunday breakfast, as I'm getting sick of the Porthole. I mean, it's fine, and has atmosphere, but been there, done that. Any suggestions are appreciatec, especially any place that makes some good corned beef hash.

A week later, I'm driving down from camp to pick up my wife and daughter at the airport. I'll want to take them out to dinner before we drive back to camp. It's my wife's birthday. She's a pescitarian (no shellfish, though), gluten free (but corn doesn't agree with her). My daughter is pretty much open to most stuff. I'd like to keep the bill at $100 or less for the three of us. Good cooking, nice atmosphere, am I asking too much?

Thanks.

Jun 29, 2014
ConsApi in Northern New England

Barbecue sauce without ketchup?

Reporting back, here's what I did:

I took a can of kosher for Passover tomato sauce and a couple of spoonfuls of tomato paste and used one of the substitution recipes that were suggested and made a "ketchup" base. Then I continued with my Mom's recipe (more or less). It turned out OK, but the tomato sauce, for some reason, is made with celery, so there was a dstinct celery falvor that carried through that was a little weird and unexpected. But them , this is Passover, and the food always has it's own distinct flavor. It worked out quite well, I grilled a chicken one night and made steak another.

Many thanks for the suggestions and pointers.

Apr 26, 2014
ConsApi in Home Cooking

Trip rerport - Hilton Head and Savannah

Did this trip two years ago, but I tried a couple of new places this time and thought I'd update my observations. Two nights in Hilton Head for a conference and a night in Savannah before returning home.

The conference was at the Omni Oceanfron, and I must say that their catered stuff wasn't bad for Hotel catered stuff for conference groups: We had a happy hour with shrimp, crab dip, empanadas italian charcuterie, etc. very nice (of course the open wine bar helped.) The rubber chicken luncheon was actually nit too bad, and the desser, a key lime pie was pretty good, I also ate at the hotel restaurant one evening,, by the time we were done networking it was late, and nobody wanted to drive off site. I got a shrimp and grits appetizer and a lbleu cheese salad that didn't have the usual gloppy bleu cheese dressing, but rather a lighter oil and vinegar dressing with lots of fresh bleu cheese. The shrimp and grits were pretty good, too. I don't think it was a classic recipe, it was spicy, but good.

The next night we went to Roast Fish and Cornbread. It seems that they gave up their wine and beer license and the place was strictly BYOB. I wonder why they did that. I thought that losing a liquor license was a death knell for a restaurant, but the place seemed busy. I had the roast fish and cornbread, a nice founder with excellent collard greens and the signature sweet potato cornbread. Also, a key lime-blueberry mini pie that wasn't typical key lime pie, but very good.Also, we had excellent service that evening.

On the way to Savannah, I stopped by the Bluffton Barbecue for some smoked meat. Had the Pork with a Fork (don't tell my rabbi! Uh, don't tell him about the shrimp, either.) with collards (good, but not as good as Roast Fish and Cornbread) and pinto beans.

In Savannah, I went to the Olde Pink House. No dinner reservations for a single diner on Friday night, but they serve the full menu at the bars. I was pretty impressed, they have a whole corps of maitre d' to seat you, and even a despised single diner like me got a helpful host to take me to the bars and find a seat. The outside bar was jammed up, but he found a seat at the tavern in the basement for me. It was an OK space, but given the warm sunny weather, I would have preferred to outside bar. I thinlk it would be a good place to go an a chilly winter evening.

The bartender was very helpful, I think I lucked out on the service front for the whole trip. He comped me an extra bourbon (he claimed a Woodford Reserve special bottling for the Restaurant) and gave me a really generous pour of Armagnac after dinner. I think I gave the appropriaate extra tip. My meal started with a gazpacho, nice chnky veggies with just the right balance of sweet and sour that enhanced the vegetable flavour but didn't overwhelm. I had the grouper, very nicely cooked, but I'm not sure it was worth the somewhat higher price. This was well paired with a sauvignon blanc recommended by the bartender. For dessert, I had one of the best pecan pies I've ever tasted. They used pecans for the crust instead of regular pie crust. The geberous ice cream on the side may have been ver the top, though. Between that and the generous pour of Armagnac, I had to toddle around downtown Savannah for a ccou0ple of hours before I felt fit to get in my car and drive back to the hotel.

My other meals included the southern Fried chicken biscuit breakfast at McDonalds, which wasn't that bad, actually, and a surprisingly good sausage gravy and buscuit in the breakfast bar at the Comfort Inn.

Apr 26, 2014
ConsApi in Southeast

Barbecue sauce without ketchup?

I want to make some homemade barbecue sauce. The recipe I have from my mom is based on ketchup. Because I'm making this for Passover and don't want to spend $$$ on special kosher for Passover ketchup, I'm wondering if someone has a recipe using plain tomato sauce as a base.

Apr 13, 2014
ConsApi in Home Cooking

The Perfect Margarita?

I just made one this evening, to fool myself into thinking summer is around the corner instead of a major snowstorm that is heading our way. Here's my recipe:

1/2 oz lime juice (no fresh limes in season, used bottled juice)
1 oz Drillaud Orange Liqueur
1 1/2 oz San Matias Legado Reposado Tequila
1 squirt of agave nectar (sorry, I have a sweet tooth)

Shaken with a couple handfuls of ice, poured out into my special 12 oz tumbler, salted on the rim. It was good, but it didn't bring on summer. I followed up with some hot buttered rum, which seemed more appropriate for the weather,

Mar 02, 2014
ConsApi in Spirits

Canadian whisky for Manhattans?

I recently read an article about the Manhattan cocktail in which the author stated that if the bar you're in doesn't have rye, you could order it made with Canadian Club, and the result should be pretty reasonable, because apparently CC is made with a lot of rye. Now my only experience with Canadian Whisky (or should it be "whiskey?") comes from a plastic 375 ml flask of CC I purchased while on a trip. For cheap whisk(e)y it seemed OK. I guess it was a bit more like the Old Overholt Rye I use in my Manhattans than bourbon. Is this rye-like taste characteristic of Canadain whisk(e)ys, or are different brands made with different grains and thus hav different flavo(u)rs?

Mar 02, 2014
ConsApi in Spirits

Lunch off I-93: Concord or Manchester

Next Monday, I expect to be driving down I-93 on my way to Boston and being in Concord or Manchester at lunch time. Any suggestions for a good quick, inexpensive lunch without having to drive too far off the highway? Last year about the same time, I drove into downtown Concord, and it seemed like everything was shut down because of the state holiday.

Jan 13, 2014
ConsApi in Northern New England

Which is the "real" White Hook Cocktail?

After I started getting into making Manhattans, I started finding various variants. One is the "red Hook," which is Rye, Punt e mes (a red vermouth), Maraschino liqueur and bitters. Then I saw one for something called a "white hook," which was made with Bols Genever, dry vermouth, maraschino, and orange botters:

http://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/20...

When I recently went to look up the recipe, if found that there's another version:

http://www.ifood.tv/recipe/whitehook-...

Th one is "white dog" (unaged corn whiskey), Punt e Mes, and maraschino with no bitters.

Because if recently bought a bottle of Dark Corners Moonshone during a recent trip to Greenville, SC, I was interested in white dog cocktails, so I tried both to compare. Of course, the were both good, but I'm curious, whoch is the "authentic" "White Hook?"

Dec 29, 2013
ConsApi in Spirits

Kosher beef cuts beside brisket

I had originally posted this on the Kosher board and was recommended that I also post here. Basically I'd like to make Texas style BBQ brisket without using brisket (If you've ever priced brisket at a kosher butcher shop, you'll know why I want to do this.) As background, for various ritual reasons, the cuts of beef sold by kosher butchers are all from the front half of the steer. So what I'm looking for is something from the forequarters that has enough fat so that when I stick it in the smoker for hours to cook it to tenderness, it won't get all dried out.

I'm interested in doing some kosher Q on my Weber grill in the backyard. I had some good results smoking a turkey, and not I want to try my hand at making the kind of good BBQ like you get in Texas. However, I recently priced a whole kosher brisket, and I'd rather not have to take out a loan just to have dinner, not to mention the fact that our 3 person family would take a long time to eat 10 lbs of meat.

I'd like to know if anyone has any experience using other beef cuts, I would think that a chuck roast might work well, especially if I talk the butcher into leaving the fat in so the meat can baste while it smokes, but I have some concern that it might be hard to carve into slices.

On a recent trip to Texas, someone served me a smoked "clod" roast (i.e. shoulder roast), which surprised me, as the cut is very lean and I would think it would get dried out if it sat in the smoker too long. I've used shoulder roasts for Maryland Pit Beef, but that's cooked rare and sliced thin, which it needs to be because the meat is sort of tough once it gets well done, but not stewed. This smoked clod, on the other hand was very well done, but not too tough and not dried out at all. I wonder how they did it.

Am I missing any other kosher cuts that might work out well on the BBQ that aren't as expensive (or large) as a whole brisket?

Thanks in advance,

Meat cuts for Kosher Q (BBQ)

I'm interested in doing some kosher Q on my Weber grill in the backyard. I had some good results smoking a turkey, and not I want to try my hand at making the kind of good BBQ like you get in Texas. However, I recently priced a whole kosher brisket, and I'd rather not have to take out a loan just to have dinner, not to mention the fact that our 3 person family would take a long time to eat 10 lbs of meat.

I'd like to know if anyone has any experience using other beef cuts, I would think that a chuck roast might work well, especially if I talk the butcher into leaving the fat in so the meat can baste while it smokes, but I have some concern that it might be hard to carve into slices.

On a recent trip to Texas, someone served me a smoked "clod" roast (i.e. shoulder roast), which surprised me, as the cut is very lean and I would think it would get dried out if it sat in the smoker too long. I've used shoulder roasts for Maryland Pit Beef, but that's cooked rare and sliced thin, which it needs to be because the meat is sort of tough once it gets well done, but not stewed. This smoked clod, on the other hand was very well done, but not too tough and not dried out at all. I wonder how they did it.

Am I missing any other kosher cuts that might work out well on the BBQ that aren't as expensive (or large) as a whole brisket?

Thanks in advance,

Oct 10, 2013
ConsApi in Kosher

North Side/Lincoln Park

I'm spending a weekend in Chicago staying at the Day's Inn on Diversey & Clark. I'm not familiar with the food situation in that end of the city Any recommendations for a good dinner? Any cuisine is fine, good cooking, and entrees under $20 (even under $15 if possible.)

I'm also looking for good places for lunch around Union Station, the Ogilvie Transportation Center, and in the Loop. Again, looking for places of local distinction, not expensive (~$10 or less) and not a national chain.

Oct 10, 2013
ConsApi in Chicago Area

Lunch in Portland Old Port

I'm going to be in Portland with the family in a couple of days, and would like some suggestions for a good lunch near the Old Port area. Some of us don't eat meat, only fish, but not shellfish. Nothing too fancy or expensive or time consuming, maybe $15 per person tops.

Jul 20, 2013
ConsApi in Northern New England

Lobstah report- Rye Harbor NH, Farmington, ME, Rangeley, ME

Well, there are, although we mostly cook and eat in camp. (I picked up some swordfish steaks and cusk at the fishmarket on the docks in Portland, and we enjoyed some grilled fish and chowder for at least 2 meals.

We've been out one night. Went to the Tall Tales Tavern in Oquossoc. That as pretty good, had the fried clam taco (if you can imagine such a thing.) The fried clams were great, but they need to take a trip to Texas to get the taco part right. The tortilla was a semi toasted flour, I think I would have preferred soft corn, and some more pico de gallo instead of the remoulade. I've had some other great stuff there, they do a real nice salmon, a lobster pot pie, and, of course, lobsters and such. One of the better restaurants in the area.

Jul 20, 2013
ConsApi in Northern New England

Lobstah report- Rye Harbor NH, Farmington, ME, Rangeley, ME

When lunch time hit, I was on I-95 at Hamppton, NH, so I ducked off the highway and started driving along the coast, looking for a place that served the crustacean. At Rye Harbor, there was a sign that said "lobster," so I turned in and parked at the small free lot that said "30 minute parking only or you get towed." There's a pay lot ($5) adjacent. The lobster place was a small shack between other shacks where they sold tickets for whale watch cruises and at least one charter fishing boat. The establishment is kknnown as "Rye Harbor Lobsters." In addition to whole lobsters (steamed or live) they also do the usual: steamers, mussels, lobster rolls ((2 kinds, one with mayo, the other with butter&sherry). "Chix" lobsters were $4.5/lb, I ordered a 1 1/2 pounder at 5.95/lb, plus a pound of steamers. It was cooked up in about 10-15 minutes, and I ate at a lawn table set up in front, although there ate also more picnic tables right by the harbor, too. The bugs were soft-shells, I didn't need the nutrackers, even for the claws, very sweet meat and a reasonable amount. It was steamed nicely, not overcooked. A nice tasty experience with the expected New England seacoast ambiance, certainly better than trying to fight my way into one of the Portland lobster joints on a Saturday night. (Alas, Three Sons on the wharf in Portland has closed, so you're stuck with the real restaurants if you want lobster there.)

The next day, it was lunchtime, and I was in Farmington Maine. With no research, I did a random stop at a place called Boivin's Harvest House Restaurant, just west of town. Typical small town country fare, they grilled steaks and burgers, but the special was a lobster roll with fries and slaw for $17. That's what I ordered, and was pleased, indeed. I shelled out the extra $0.95 for sweet potato fries, which were some of the best I've ever had. The lobster roll was excellent, full of whole claws, dressed with lust a little mayo, the bun grilled properly. The slaw was also good, again, just enough mayo to give flavor, most places overdo the mayo.

Finally, having arrived in Rangeley, I was in town at lunch tine, and stopped off at the Pine Tree Frosty, which mostly sells ice cream, but has a grill. They too, had a lobster roll, which I decided to try. A bit smaller than Boivin's Harvey House, but a nice serving of lobster, and you could taste the butter on the grilled bun.

That's all for now. I think we'll be buyig the next batch live to cook at the camp.

Lunch -- Rockefeller center - Bloomingdales

My daughter (a 20-something) and I are visiting Manhattan tomorrow to see a few sites and do some shopping. Around lunchtime we should be somewhere between Rockefeller Center and Bloomingdales our plan is to go up 5th Av., maybe walk through Central park a bit, and head over to Bloomingdales.
Would appreciate some suggestions for a nice, but inexpensive (<$15 each) place to eat lunch. Any type of cuisine is OK, just looking for something unique and tasty.

Jun 21, 2013
ConsApi in Manhattan

Good local food near tourist locations

" but the same food would not generally survive in a restaurant, it is overpriced for what you get, and in bad weather it's just a lousy idea."

OK, you have a point with the "bad weather," but in a few weeks that won't be an issue. If the food is so bad, then why are the trucks successful enough to open brick& mortar restaurants? I eat at both kinds of places, the food trucks have good food and they're nit particularly overpriced for what you get. Sure, you can go to McDonalds and Subway and get cheaper. So what?

"Loeb's is low-grade stuff, I'd just as soon eat at the supermarket."

What supermarket do you shop at? I've been eating Jewish deli since I was a kid in New York, Philly, Baltimore, and Chicago, and Loebs is good. Sure, it's not the Mile End in Brooklyn, but then, the Pastrami sandwiches are less than $9.

"Also, I'd take Moby Dick straight up over Roti anyday. Especially their ground chicken kabob, which is an option hard to find elsewhere."

Yeah, but Moby Dick is way up Connecticut Ave, far from the tourist spots. And if you're going up there, I prefer the House of Kabob at 1829 M St. NW.

"Most people working in DC are stuck with a few bad options unless they want to take the time to sit down at a restaurant."

It's really not as bad as all the food snobs say, and eating at a real restaurant downtown will set you back at least 20 bucks for lunch. The food trucks and the more interesting carryouts will set you back $10, To go cheaper, it's national chains. All of the interesting neighborhood places are not near the tourist spots. That;s just the way it is. No need to be a foodie snob, there's plenty of decent stuff in downtown DC, it's just a bit expensive, as one might expect.

"For sale in Texas only" (?) lower end Texas wines

The terminology "For sale in Texas only" suggests that this is some sort of exclusive special product that you can't get anywhere else. What it actually means is that the wine is not fully a product of Texas, but may well be California plonk rebottled with the name of a Texas winery. Now, California plonk may be fine to have with spaghetti and meatballs, but why does the seller need to suggest that this is a Texas product?

I'm sorry, I spend my life having to put up with sales and marketing bullshit from the people who sell me the things I need to live my life. Is private business capable of telling the truth about the stuff they sell to us? You can see why at times I think a socialist revolution might be the only way to deal with these lying biznoids.

Mar 06, 2013
ConsApi in Wine

"For sale in Texas only" (?) lower end Texas wines

Thanks for the replies. It's clear this is similar to the "American Riesling" I once purchased from a West Virginia winery. I guess I shouldn't be too bent out of shape, as it's not like I paid extra for these wines, they were basically plonk, good plonk, but plonk nonetheless. But, still, why can't the private sector be honest about the stuff they sell? It's enough to turn one into a socialist!

Mar 06, 2013
ConsApi in Wine