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Unicorn Mark on Antique Copper?

I think the goat's left ear is easily mistaken as a singe (unicorn) horn. That's what my eyes saw at first glance. The two horns then appear to be ears, thrown back. Of course that leaves you trying to figure out what that extra thing is on the right side of its head, but if you look at the animal with the assumption that it is a unicorn, your eyes can see it as part of the mane. It's a goat of course, but seeing it as a unicorn is not a stretch.

Jun 11, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Help!

BKF will be the easiest way to return the copper color, but, because of its abrasiveness, it will give your copper more of a matte finish. If you want to keep the mirror polish look, use a copper paste of some kind. Just grab a copper polish from the hardware store. I think I've been using the Wright's Copper Polish lately, and it works just fine without being too abrasive.

That being said, you will have to polish copper after every use if you need to have it look like fresh copper. Copper tarnishes, and the tarnish will look different depending on the level of heat used, the duration of cooking, and how much food you spill down the sides of the pot. My recommendation is to learn to be ok with tarnished copper, get yourself some polish, and bring it back up to full luster from time-to-time. Most of my pans get the treatment once or twice a year. I don't do it all at the same time, but I'll grab a pan once every couple of weeks and give it a shine.

May 13, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Bundt pans?

Of the currently produced ones, the thick Nordic Ware ones are the best (in my opinion):

http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-Pla...

Same, but from WS: http://www.williams-sonoma.com/produc...

Same as your OP pan, but from Amazon at a lower price: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002...

I have the original (Anniversary) one, and I love it. If I were to add a second, it would be the one you linked to.

Nordic Ware makes a bunch of cool bundt pans: https://www.nordicware.com/store/cate... but I would stick to the thick cast ones. The Jubilee and the Fleur de Lis pans are really cool!

May 09, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Mauviel 5217.40GWP vs. 5217.15GWP0 roaster differences?

Sid,

I bought one of these a year or two ago. I don't remember which number it was, but it was the M'Cook 5 ply roaster that was advertised as 2.6mm thick, and it was a tremendous disappointment. In what is seeming more like typical Mauviel fashion, the specs were way off. The pan I received was about 2.1 mm thick and weighed substantially less than the specified weight. It wasn't the 1.5mm--I've seen them, and they are really thin. I had high hopes for that pan, but I returned it because it wasn't what I had hoped for. I hope you fid one as thick as advertised, but my experience is that the spec with Mauviel is more like, "I won't be any thicker or heavier than that."

It sounds pathetic, but I'm still, for over two years now, looking for an excellent roaster that doesn't break the bank.

Apr 20, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Which Copper Pots are REALLY Worth the Additional Cost?

Hi Kaleo,

We didn't have a lengthy conversation about it, but I got the sense that he needed to focus on the sautes for now and see how it goes down the road. I would love to see some other pieces with the same quality of craftsmanship!

Jeremy

Apr 18, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Which Copper Pots are REALLY Worth the Additional Cost?

I asked him, and he said he is.

Apr 18, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

duck press

Ok, I don't know a whole lot about buying a duck press, so this thread got me looking around at them--out of curiosity. I have no comment on the quality of various presses, but the reviews on the Bourgeat press at Amazon made me chuckle: http://www.amazon.com/CARCASS-PRESS-S...

One thought that did cross my mind was, what about an old-fashioned cider press? Could something like that work as-is or be modified to work?

Apr 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Ebay copper pans buy, help with likely manufacture.

Very nice job sniffing out a great deal! Especially with those lids, you did very nicely! Good lollipop lids are hard to come by.

You said that the tin-lined pans were marked Mauviel. What are the SS-lined pans marked?

Apr 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Which Copper Pots are REALLY Worth the Additional Cost?

Jim from East Coast Tinning is making those Duparquet pans. You'll notice that the mark says "D.H&M. CO. R.I." instead of the old "D.H&M. CO. N.Y."

Mac also says he'll be back up and running soon and will have thicker stuff than he did in the past. I don't know if the means 2.5mm or 3mm, but it's better than nothing.

Apr 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

small saucepan

Here's a really nice 1/2 Quart pan:

http://www.falkusa.com/10cm-falk-clas...

and lid:

http://www.falkusa.com/10cm-falk-clas...

I didn't say it was cheap!

Mar 18, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper pots better? why?

Hi,

I'll leave it to others to tell you more about the brand, but a 9.5" x 6" pot will hold roughly 7--7.25 quarts. The "24" probably refers to the diameter in centimeters, and the "7" is probably the number of this pot in the sequence of saucepans. My guess is that the little .5-.75 qt sauce pan is #1, the 1.25 qt is #2, and so on until this, which is #7.

I would use it if it had only a small area of copper showing. Enjoy it!

Mar 01, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Best omelet pan?

It's not about the pan imparting taste. Water is tasteless, yet you'd probably agree that a poached eggs tastes different than one that's dropped into a NS pan and fried, and that would taste different than an egg that is dropped in a bowl and microwaved. In all three cases, we have the same ingredients--an egg. The method and the tools alter the precise nature of the cooking process which alters the taste.

Feb 24, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Best omelet pan?

I'll lend my support to this notion. I have noticed a distinct difference in taste, and my wife, without knowing how I prepared the eggs, has commented on the taste difference. I use a NS pan for omelettes and scrambled eggs only, and I use steel or iron for over-easy. The few times I've inadvertently fried eggs in the NS instead of the steel or iron, they have tasted different--a not good kind of different.

I don't know the reasons for the difference, but I suspect that it has to do with the flavors created when the egg sticks to the steel or iron and sears a bit before releasing, whereas in a NS pan, these flavors do not appear. It's fine for eggs that you don't want any sticking with (omelettes or scrambled), but it doesn't work for fried eggs in my opinion.

Feb 24, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper pot tin lining question. Help!

I also have done this very thing. It has happened to me when searing food and my tongs scrape along an area of tin with no food on it. In my case, it wasn't that the food grabbed the tin, but that the implement I was using scraped an area of overheated tin. I think Kaleo is right on. It's just a light smear of the tin as it approaches it's melting point. It will darken back over like the rest of the tin.

Feb 06, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Most frequently used kitchen tool?

Virtually all cooking, no matter what I plan to do with the food starts with a chef's knife and my cutting board. So that would have to be it.

Jan 15, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper pan lining silver? Nickel? SS? Calling Kaleo!

Can you check to see if your rivets are magnetic?

Jan 13, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper pan lining silver? Nickel? SS? Calling Kaleo!

The only thing I'll add to what Kaleo has to say here is that I have seen Stainless that will discolor rapidly, but it was all older (late 60's--early 70's) cookware. I don't know if formulations have changed over time, but I had a bimetal pan that would darken almost black after a single cooking session. Mine was magnetic and had the classic stainless concentric brush marks though.

Another note is that your rivets appear not to be copper. They look like stainless rivets from the photo, so it is unlikely that you have tin. My understanding--which could be wrong--is that nickel plate is usually over copper. All of which leads be to guess that you are looking at a highly polished stainless lining.

Jan 13, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper pan lining silver? Nickel? SS? Calling Kaleo!

Actually, Tin is not magnetic, Nickel and Stainless can be.

Jan 13, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper Stock Pot, uses and functions

Stock, chickens, marinara and derivative sauces, lobster, king crab legs, soups and stews, laundry detergent, etc.

Jan 10, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Big saute pan recommendations?

I've had the All-Clad 6 quart, and I cannot recommend it. I used it on the largest burner on my Frigidaire Gas stove, and it just couldn't heat up out to the edges. For something that big, I'd suggest skipping the dishwasher and going for copper. As an alternative, get a thick aluminum one from a restaurant supply store.

Jan 06, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

So, if All-Clad isn't the beat all end all, what is?

There are a number here, including several fry pans, NOS with stickers: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trksi...

My omelette pan is a Volrath Wearever, and I love it.

Jan 04, 2014
jljohn in Cookware
1

So, if All-Clad isn't the beat all end all, what is?

Precisely. I was referring to old copper--the kind of stuff you would dig up on craigslist or ebay. Ignoring the unusually thick (4mm) stuff or the rare collector's piece, it is less expensive than a new All-Clad piece of similar shape and size.

Jan 03, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

So, if All-Clad isn't the beat all end all, what is?

"So, if All-Clad isn't the beat all end all, what is?"

Vintage copper. No brands--just old, thick, French, hammered copper.

- It's been around a really long time. Even at 100 years old, it's probably not even near half its life cycle.

- Unbelievable assortment of pieces. I've even seen saucepans I could sit in!

- Re-read the first point.

- Costs less than All-clad.

(jokingly done point for point against yours.)

To me the benefits of All-clad are really that (1) it is made in the USA, (2) and it carries a fantastic warranty. There is other new cookware out there that performs as good at lower cost, but it is not USA made with A-C's warranty. None of that changes the fact (IMHO) that the best cookware out there is generally used.

Jan 03, 2014
jljohn in Cookware
1

Best omelet pan?

For French Omelets, I'd recommend a simple non-stick aluminum pan. I used a carbon steel pan for a year or so, but, in my experience, unless you make omelets several times a week, you will have trouble getting and maintaining the necessary seasoning. I bought a Volrath (US made) Thick aluminum pan with a very durable non-stick finish, and it works like a charm.

Dec 27, 2013
jljohn in Cookware

Spots on new copper pot?!? Please help

Respectfully, I disagree--don't exchange it. If it really bothers you, it would be best to avoid copper. Copper does not and will not stay in any one state. If you touch it, it will tarnish where you touched it. If you put it on the stove, it will darken where heat hits it. If food drips down the side, it will have streaks down the side. On the whole, it will steadily go from bright and shiny to dark brown. If the pretty factor is paramount, then you need never to touch or use it, or you'll need to polish it after every use. If you can get used to spots, marks, stains, and tarnish, then you have what is basically the best saucepan money can buy. Use it, and enjoy it (and marvel at the many shades your pot will take on before it finally turn brown; then polish it and start over)!

What I see in your photo looks like a light tarnish from handling. It's normal. I hope you enjoy it!

Dec 27, 2013
jljohn in Cookware

A Question About Used Tin-Lined Copper

Thanks for the advice! The outside will be no problem at all if the photos are representative, but the interior is quite grungy--especially the lid. I'll try a bit of simmering with soda and a gentle scrubbing and see where it goes.

There is a bit of copper showing on the high points of the rivets, but elsewhere the lining seems to be solid and intact, so hopefully, I can get some good use out of it before needing to re-tin.

I'll try to post back about how it goes.

Dec 20, 2013
jljohn in Cookware

Good choice for first piece of copper cookware?

I am guessing that recommendation had to do with the cast iron handle. You do not need to season it. You can, but you don't need to.

Dec 19, 2013
jljohn in Cookware

A Question About Used Tin-Lined Copper

If you bought a really filthy tin-lined pot with an unknown history with the lining still intact, how would you prep it for use? With a stainless pot, I might, for example, scrub it up with a bleach solution or BKF. Would you re-tin, scrub some tin away, hit it with a strong cleansing agent without regard to the tin, or just give it a soapy wash and use it?

Thanks in advance!

Dec 17, 2013
jljohn in Cookware

Best wine bottle opener

A saber, of course: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabrage

(:

Seriously, after cycling though a number of others, I settled on the Pulltap's as well. Relatively inexpensive and simple.

Dec 13, 2013
jljohn in Cookware

Copper vs. Good Stainless Cookware

It's an 11" marked "E. Dehillerin." I bought it second hand from a fellow who got it while a student in France in the late 70's. His, original, coat of tin lasted 30 years, and I had it re-tinned when I bought it. So, it's good to go for another 30. I wish it we hammered, but, as it is, it's nice and thick and does a beautiful job. So, I can't complain!

Dec 09, 2013
jljohn in Cookware