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Staub cocotte lid wobble

Interesting. Out of curiosity, did they come to you that way, or have you worn the enamel off those spots (since the three raised bumps are the only contact points on the rim)?

about 5 hours ago
jljohn in Cookware

Staub cocotte lid wobble

Ray,

You do know that the black on the inside of the pot and the underside of the lid is enamel, right? The only area on a Staub pot that is not enameled is the very rim at the topmost portion of the pot and the rim at the lowest sitting portion of the lid. Basically, if you set the lid on the counter, the lip that is touching the counter (and only that little sliver of iron) is not enameled, but all the rest of the lid, interior and exterior, is. Similarly, if you place the pot upside down on the counter, the lip touching the counter is not enameled, but all the rest of the pot is. Go back to the photo I referenced earlier, and you'll see, pretty clearly, what I am saying ( third photo down: http://somethingnewfordinner.com/tool... ). I would be very surprised if yours were different.

Jeremy

about 6 hours ago
jljohn in Cookware

Staub cocotte lid wobble

Plus, the bumps are enameled. So you'd have to file through the enamel on the bump without chipping or compromising any other enamel around it (which would be fairly difficult, I think).

about 8 hours ago
jljohn in Cookware

OMG, Williams Sonoma

dozenegggz,

In case you don't know what that little sub-thread is about, WS sent out an over-the-top holiday catalog last year that got mocked and parodied (see here for a good example, and hopefully a good laugh: http://deadspin.com/5959212/the-hater... ) I hope you can both appreciate what WS provides as a retailer and enjoy seeing them pilloried at the same time!

I enjoy walking into a well stocked WS myself. I typically don't buy too much, but the sights and smells are often quite inspiring. I hope your new purchases get you cooking and enjoying it!

1 day ago
jljohn in Cookware

OMG, Williams Sonoma

Has the holiday catalog gone out yet? I hope I haven't missed it. It's just too much fun: found Hungarian sack cloth is still my favorite.

1 day ago
jljohn in Cookware

Staub cocotte lid wobble

"Steam should not leak out."

This is just plain wrong. It's a cocotte, not a pressure cooker. Pick any of your Staub's, fill it half way with water, and place it on a burner until it hits a rolling boil. You will have steam pouring out from under your lid.

The lids don't fit tightly by any stretch of the imagination; they are just heavy, which gives the illusion of tightness. In fact, Staub places bumps on the rim of the lid to keep one of its ends elevated slightly, so that it allows steam to escape without the lid rattling. See this link (not written by me): http://somethingnewfordinner.com/tool... Look at the photo of the underside of the Staub lid (third photo down). Near the bottom of the photo, on the rim of the lid you'll see a bump. This not only allows the steam to escape, but it allows the lid to wobble if you push down on it.

Oct 20, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Which of these pans should I use to pan sear salmon?

[Deleted] Nevermind, I see that I'm late for dinner.

Oct 18, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Best Cookware Of 2014

No Dave, I am not. No part of Bourgeat cookware is 1/8" thick. 1/8" is 3.2mm. Bourgeat is 2.5mm if you count the copper and the Stainless. The copper is only 2.25mm.

Generally speaking, 2.5mm copper (forte) is considered to be a full step down from from 1/8" / 3.2mm copper (extra forte).

Your information is wrong.

Oct 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Best Cookware Of 2014

Regarding the Bourgeat cookware, you write: "The exterior, 1/8” layer of copper is the best cookware material for heat conductivity, sensitivity and distribution."

Oct 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Best Cookware Of 2014

I add a second post to answer your question: My favorite cookware of 2014. Since much of my favorite cookware is not currently manufactured, I'll list my favorite followed (in parenthesis) by what would be the closest currently produced model that I am aware of. Of course there may be better cookware that I have not yet tried. For example, I have never used vintage cast iron in place of my Lodge Skillets. However, I can only write my experiences.

Griddle: large uncoated cast aluminum griddle from Bridge (no currently available equivalent).

Skillets: Lodge Cast Iron (currently available).

Non-Stick Frying Pan: Vollrath Wear-Ever (currently available)

Saute Pans: Vintage Tin-Lined 3+mm Copper, preferably hammered (The only currently available equivalent that I am aware is this: http://www.dhandm.com/ At a more commercial level, and slightly thinner, is the the Mauviel Professional Tin-Lined Saute Pan here: http://www.buycoppercookware.com/saut...

)

Saucepans and Sauteuse Evasee pans: Vintage Tin-Lined 3+mm Copper, preferably hammered (There are no currently available equivalents of which I am aware. Once Mac is up and running, I expect that he will have the equivalent: http://www.brooklyncoppercookware.com... At a more commercial level, and slightly thinner, are the the Mauviel Professional Tin-Lined Pans here: http://www.buycoppercookware.com/trad...

)

Casseroles / French Ovens / Dutch Ovens / Stewpans: I use both a 5 Qt LC Round and a 7 Qt Staub Oval. Both are great in the oven and serviceable on the stovetop. I like both and think that the choice between the companies is largely aesthetic. (Both are currently available.) I also use Vintage Tin-Lined 3+mm Copper, preferably hammered, Casseroles. (There are no currently available equivalents of which I am aware. Once Mac is up and running, I expect that he will have the equivalent: http://www.brooklyncoppercookware.com... At a more commercial level, and slightly thinner, are the the Mauviel Professional Tin-Lined Pans here: http://www.buycoppercookware.com/cass...

)

Stockpots: Mauviel Tin-Lined Hammered, 2.4-2.5mm stockpot (currently available)

Roasting Pan: I'm still looking for a good used 2.5mm stainless-lined copper roasting pan at the right price.

Misc. Roasting/Specialty: I have several stoneware roasting pans that I like for miscellaneous tasks.

Bakeware: Depending on the item, I have a large-scale preference for either Fat Daddios (cake pans and sheets) and Nordic Ware (bundt pans, popover pans, and sheets).

Hope this is helpful!

Oct 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Best Cookware Of 2014

Hi Davie (or Chef Dan?),

I went over to the site and took a quick peek at the "Best Copper Cookware" section. I'm sorry, but there is quite a bit of mis-information and sales talk here.

For example, regarding the All-Clad Copper Core you write: "With a copper core and two layers of aluminum, Copper Core pans offer the ultimate in heat distribution and conductivity. The pure copper core is the key to the high-performance this cookware offers. No other cooking material can compare to the heat conductivity and distribution of copper. Aluminum is second to copper in this regard." You could argue that they are the ultimate pan (because of a combination of qualities), but claiming that Cu + Al = "the ultimate in heat distribution and conductivity," and immediately following it with a statement that "No other cooking material can compare to the heat conductivity and distribution of copper. Aluminum is second to copper in this regard" is an exercise in balderdash.

In the Mauviel Section, you've missed an entire branch of the Mauviel family of copper cookware: see here http://www.buycoppercookware.com/trad... I'm honestly not sure if this is something that falls outside the M'X family trees or if it is part of the M'Tradition line, but there is an entire batterie of thick tin-lined copper still available from Mauviel.

Regarding the Bourgeat cookware, you write: "The exterior, 1/8” layer of copper is the best cookware material for heat conductivity, sensitivity and distribution." First, this contradicts your statements about All-Clad. Second, Bourgeat copper is not 1/8" thick, which would be 3.2mm of copper; rather it it 2.5mm, of which only about 2.25mm is copper.

Lastly, I'll note that you have completely left Falk out of the picture. I am not particularly a fan of Falk, for personal reasons, but personal preferences aside, you'd be hard pressed to differentiate in a best cookware list between Bourgeat, Falk, and Mauviel.

Based on the copper section of the site, I'd say that you are basing your pool almost entirely on what you can provide an Amazon purchase link for. You've thus compromised the value of your analysis. And, your descriptions are characteristic of sales claims and language and don't smack at all of an actual user's review.

I do not intend in anyway to criticize your opinions. Rather, I don't see your opinion reflected on this site. I see a sales pitch characterized as a review of sorts. And, please, let me be clear--you are a chef, and so you probably have a lot of helpful information and opinions about the numerous products you've used over the years. I'd love to read those experiences and opinions. I highly doubt if there has been much change in your pan preferences from year to year, and I wouldn't be surprised to know that some of your favorites are no longer being manufactured, but please write your experiences and opinions regarding what you've used, and don't exclude things because they are not available on Amazon.

Oct 17, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Bought these copper pans from the charity shop, what's inside them?

"Don't use metal utensils and the tin will last much longer. I like Exoglass whisks and other utensils from Matfer Bourgeat, and then of course wooden spoons from anywhere."

JustCharlie,

The ExoGlass whisks from Matfer use stainless steel wire. ExoGlass is the handle material. I wouldn't recommend them to the OP for use in his tin-lined pans. The choices for whisks is not great, but he should be on the lookout for a thin-wired, yet stiff, coated or plastic whisk or, better yet I'm told, a bent birch whisk. The rest of the tools are easy to find in wood or plastic, but it's tough to find a really good non-metal whisk.

jljohn

Oct 16, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Mauviel 250C: Issues with Purchase

My gut tells me that there is something fishy about the saucepan. It should have three rivets. Also, I wouldn't be ok with the gap in the saute pan's rivet. I think I'd be sending both back.

I don't know who your retailer was, but you could aways try Gary at buycoppercookware.com. (No affiliation). I'd imagine he could put good copies of these two pans into your hands.

Oct 14, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Winter Emergency Stock-Up

Two words: dried beans. Ten pounds of beans (black, pink, white, heirloom varieties, whatever you like) take up about 5-6 quarts of storage space, they mix well with rice, go into soups and stews, can be tossed on greens, mixed with eggs, or eaten plain. They are super easy to make up, hold up well after initial cooking, are nutritious, and 10 pounds would easily feed a couple of people for a week.

I'm not suggesting that you eat nothing but beans, but if you need an emergency food source, have a little stash of beans in the pantry can get you a long way.

In addition to beans, we keep a decent supply of grains (milled and whole), pasta, frozen sauces and soups, and a backup or two of must in-use items (yogurt, peanut butter, cheese, eggs, etc). Yes, Milk and fresh veggies would run out, but I think 10 days would be doable.

Oct 10, 2014
jljohn in General Topics
1

stainless steel sheet pan?

Conductivity (and its twin sister evenness) is virtually a non-issue inside an oven. This is precisely why so many hard-core copper users are totally fine with a stainless roaster in the oven. Now, when moving to the stovetop for gravy, it's a different story.

Oct 10, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Am I being too cheap? Splitting restaurant bill on family vacation

Let me ask you this: if you took this GF on a date, would you pay for her meal?

This is not about cheapness or fugality. If you were asking this question regarding a trip with a bunch of college (or high school) friends, then maybe it could be about cheapness, but in this case it's all about the girl.

At the end of the day, this decision is about how you feel about your GF. If you are serious about her, then drop it, go on the vacation, and pay the share they've determined (happily). If you are not, drop the GF, stay home, and save your money. I don't know where in the relationship you are, but this is a crossroads, so-to-speak.

Oct 10, 2014
jljohn in Not About Food
1

Can't Season Cast Iron w/Unrefined Coconut Oil - Help!

I know this thread is several months old, but, if you feel this way, why by second-hand cast iron?

First, when cooking in a cast iron pan, one cooks on the seasoning layer, so if you've stripped all layers off an old pan, it's unlikely that there any animal remnants left for you to consume. You are not cooking on a "cruddy old pan" after you've stripped it. You are cooking on clean iron.

Second, if you don't accept that the seasoning layer prevented a previous user's meat from contacting the iron, why would you believe that your seasoning layer would keep a previous users meat residue from contacting your food?

In the end, if you are this concerned about your food touching the bare iron is an old pan that may have been used to cook meat, why not but a new pan and strip it (if you have a problem with the seasoning Lodge uses)?

Oct 07, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Any Peeler Experts?

Well, shoot. I may have to go to the hardware store tomorrow for a clean brush and give this a shot. That's awesome.

Oct 01, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Any Peeler Experts?

I use this Zyliss for everyday peeling (carrots, potatoes, kids use it for apples, etc):

http://www.amazon.com/Zyliss-30600-Fr...

And I use an unmarked, all-stainless, Y-shaped, non-serrated peeler that I grabbed from WS a few years ago for squash. It takes seconds to peel a butternut squash with this thing! I wish I knew what it was, but it's just the generic Y peeler from their wall of stainless kitchen accessories.

I've been very happy with this combo for several years now.

Oct 01, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Quintessential Cookware Set?

Depends entirely on the size: my 5 piece would look very different from a 20 piece. But for a rudimentary 5 piece set (lids, if counted, would make it 8 pieces):

11" / 4 Quart Saute

8" / 2 Quart Saucier or Windsor

9.5" / 3 Quart Saucier or Windsor

9.5" / 5.5 Quart Casserole (aka Dutch or French Oven)

9.5" / 11 Quart Stockpot

8" Lid

9.5" Lid

11" Lid

I like your list very much, but I would view the 5 Qt Rondeau and the 6 Quart stockpot as not having enough volume difference, and 6 Qts would be too small for a large pot. Also, the two three quart pans would be redundant and don't provide a small pan. A conically shaped 2 quart has a narrow enough bottom to melt butter and perform small sauce-making tasks. So, I basically adjusted your kit with this in mind and got the list above

Sep 29, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

95%: Cookware

A qualified yes. For me, 95+% could be made in my 11" saute, my 9.5" / 3 quart windsor, and a large pot (I use three pots in rotation, but I could easily make do for all purposes with an 11" / 10 quart pot. The jelly roll pan handles the vast majority of what goes in my oven. I do most of my cutting with a 10" chef's knife, on a cutting board, of coarse. And I would have to add a spatula (i.e. a turner) and a wooden spoon to the tongs. In fact, when used together they can replace the tongs. If I had to start fresh with a new kitchen, this is what I'd be buying first, and I could make do with little else.

Sep 23, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Copper Sauciers - Falk vs. Matfer Bourgeat

I don't know if was the size of the handle or the placement, but I felt that the 3 quart I owned for a short time had a tendency to roll in my hand. I preferred the two handled version of this pot much more (even though I eventually sold it in favor of tin-lined pans.)

Aug 23, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

All Natural (non-petroleum-based) Way to Protect Cutting Boards?

"If one wants to tell the truth, then one might start out by doing so."

Is it now required to disclose in full all reasons for asking a question on internet forums before asking them or risk being untruthful? I simply asked "What is the best way to treat and protect a [cutting board without using petroleum products]?" I neither gave nor implied a motive. Whether I asked to implement the method myself, to satisfy my own curiosity, or to settle a bet, what does it matter?

Aug 22, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

All Natural (non-petroleum-based) Way to Protect Cutting Boards?

No issues with it going rancid?

Aug 21, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

All Natural (non-petroleum-based) Way to Protect Cutting Boards?

May I ask why you assume this question is driven by a phobia of some sort? That seems awfully presumptive. Truth be told, I've been reading Wendell Berry on the subject of industrial agriculture and petroleum dependency. This led me, academically, to think about petroleum products and by-products that I use every day, and as something of an academic exercise I took to wondering how an end-grain cutting board could be cared for without the use of a petroleum by-product. It seems that, at least in the opinion of most here, you need to use a petroleum derivative to care for a modern cutting board.

Aug 21, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

All Natural (non-petroleum-based) Way to Protect Cutting Boards?

GH,

By your usage, the term "natural" looses all meaning. Everything on this planet has been derived only from other things on this planet, so everything must be natural, right? I'm sure you must understand what most people mean when they say "natural," so there is no need to be obtuse.

Surely you can understand how beeswax, on a cutting board, would be viewed by virtually everyone as more "natural" (in the common use of that term) than motor oil, mineral oil, or any other petroleum distillate?

Aug 21, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

All Natural (non-petroleum-based) Way to Protect Cutting Boards?

Food grade mineral oil is still a petroleum derivative, right? Would melting the beeswax before applying would help it seep in?

Aug 20, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

All Natural (non-petroleum-based) Way to Protect Cutting Boards?

What is the best way to treat and protect an end-grain board without the use of Mineral Oil? Straight Beeswax? Cooking oil? Thanks!

Aug 20, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Mistakes, I've made a few

Do you want to sell that stockpot? :) I just made 10 gallons of marinara across three batches and was scheming how to get it done in one batch. A 12-gallon stocker would handle a 100lbs of tomatoes in one shot! But, it probably wouldn't even fit on my stovetop!

I think the biggest mistake I've made, and it is highlighted in this thread, is buying new items, at full price, before I knew I needed it. Dabbling it items at retail is a guaranteed loss when you find out you don't need, don't want it, or just need a different size. If you experiment in the vintage and used market, you can usually break even or even male a little if you play it smart.

Aug 20, 2014
jljohn in Cookware

Mistakes, I've made a few

Do you want to sell that stockpot? :) I just made 10 gallons of marinara across three batches and was scheming how to get it done in one batch. A 12-gallon stocker would handle a 100lbs of tomatoes in one shot! But, it probably wouldn't even fit on my stovetop!

I think the biggest mistake I've made, and it is highlighted in this thread, is buying new items, at full price, before I knew I needed them. Dabbling in items at retail is a guaranteed loss when you find out you don't need it, don't want it, or just need a different size. If you experiment in the vintage and used market, you can usually break even or even male a little if you play it smart.

Aug 20, 2014
jljohn in Cookware