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GH1618's Profile

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Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

I've used it for an all-female group without any objection. Would you prefer "girls"?

about 9 hours ago
GH1618 in Not About Food

Highly rated Steak Knives

It seems to me if you need a razor sharp knife to cut a steak, there is something wrong with the steak. Don't worry about the knife-on-ceramic issue. Concentrate on the choice of meat and its preparation and leave the knife wonks off the guest list.

1 day ago
GH1618 in Cookware

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

Dictionaries once were thought of as setting rules for Standard English, but that view has fallen out of favor. Dictionaries are now mostly descriptive, not prescriptive. You have to go to a usage guide to see English standards upheld. Garner is a good one.

1 day ago
GH1618 in Not About Food
1

Highly rated Steak Knives

My feeling is that inexpensive steak knives are extremely adequate. I have Chicago Cutlery "Metro" because I like the handles.

1 day ago
GH1618 in Cookware

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

Dictionaries don't define "proper English" (whatever that means), they report usage. The New Shorter Oxford describes this usage as a chiefly North American colloquialism. Garner (a usage guide) sticks up for "you all" as a noncolloquial (albeit regional) equivalent.

Cheddar price insanity at WF

It's crazy, but evidently there are enough people around willing and able to pay ridiculous prices for cheese (and everything else) that there is always a market for such things.

Nov 23, 2014
GH1618 in Cheese

Best non stick cookware for crepes or tortilla/ chapati

Teflon is safe, but the best way to make a crêpe is in a plain steel crêpe pan.

Nov 21, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

I expect you are making this up as a joke. I've seen people thrown out of restaurants for less.

Nov 21, 2014
GH1618 in Not About Food

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

If not P-A C, it is at least hyper-sensitive and intolerant of another person's manner of speaking. It is that person's intent which matters, and I am sure there was no intent to insult or demean you. Good manners dictates that you should lighten up.

Nov 21, 2014
GH1618 in Not About Food

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

"Gentlemen" is not too formal to be used in a bar. In a dive bar, perhaps.

Nov 21, 2014
GH1618 in Not About Food
1

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

"You" is a pronoun and "guys" is a noun, so it is not a direct equivalence, and it is ambiguous as to number. Southerners would say "you all" ("y'all" informally). This is probably the best alternative, but non-southerners avoid it because it would seem affected.

Nov 21, 2014
GH1618 in Not About Food

Let's ban the word GUYS!!!

You can't dictate informal use of language. In this context it serves a purpose, because there is no brief, gender-neutral alternative.

Nov 21, 2014
GH1618 in Not About Food

Mauviel Copper Sauce Pan

That's what happens when you overheat a tin lining. Tin was used in medieval times because of the limitations of the technology of the era. It's a mystery to me why this is still used for cooking.

Nov 20, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware

Cookware that's safe for high heat

If you don't want to worry about high heat damaging your cookware, heavy carbon steel is best. At the moderate heat you would use for most things and any sauces, any cooking surface will do -- you should just use what works well in other respects.

I prefer hard-anodized aluminum for sautéing vegetables, specifically a Calphalon Commercial "omelette" pan. This does not have a nonstick coating.

"Ceramic" does not imply absence of PTFE. Scanpan has a titanium ceramic coating with added PTFE (there is no PFOA).

Nov 20, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware

Wet Brining science question

Presumably the OP wants to brine something for human consumption.

Nov 20, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking

Wet Brining science question

Homeostasis is a condition of balance reached in living biological organisms. The normal saline balance in humans is 9g/l.

Nov 20, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking

COMMERCIAL COOKWARE -- Which is best for home use?

No. Cookware should last a lifetime or more. If you no longer use a particular piece, you can pass it on. Sturdy cookware need not be so expensive that one must "justify" it.

Nov 19, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware
1

All this talk about quality cookware . . .

A big factor is just tradition, in my opinion. Copper was the first metal to be refined and used for tools, so there is a very long tradition behind copper cookware. Nowadays, it's too expensive to be cost-effective compared to modern alternatives, so it is used where price is not an important factor. Most professional kitchens by far are not using copper pots because there is no advantage to them which is worth the price differential.

Nov 19, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware
1

Your way to cook eggs

Fried, over easy: I use a small Teflon pan with a little butter, and cook over low heat. I turn the eggs when they slide in the pan easily, then by tossing them in the air. The pan is small enough so that the whites merge and has sides amenable to the toss/flip manoever. I continue cooking only enough to finish the whites, then toss/flip the eggs back and serve.

Soft boiled: I use a small saucepan to bring water to a boil, add two or three large eggs, then simmer for seven minutes. Then I dump the water and cool the eggs a bit in cold water (very briefly). Then crack and scoop the eggs into a bowl with a little butter. It is less messy to crack the egg off center so the yolk remains in one piece.

Hard boiled: I put the eggs in a small saucepan with cold water, bring to a boil, then cover and turn off the heat. In twelve minutes I pour off the water and cool the eggs with cold water, then refrigerate.

Omelette: I've started using a Scanpan Classic. It's important to use the right size pan. The eight-inch is right for a three-egg omelette, but not larger. Omelettes are harder than scrambled, so I'm still working on it. Generally, I want a little browning on an omelette, which I don't want on eggs cooked in other ways.

Poached: I don't see the point, so never do this.

I always add the salt during prep or cooking. If the fried eggs are for myself, I also add black pepper and hot sauce during cooking.

Nov 19, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking

Pumpkin Pie-first time making/too many recipe options!

Addendum: If you use the Libby's recipe, cut the sugar in half.

Nov 18, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking
1

Pumpkin Pie-first time making/too many recipe options!

Just use the one on the Libby's can, adjusting spices to your taste. Concentrate on the crust. A crust made from scratch makes a difference.

Nov 18, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking
2

COMMERCIAL COOKWARE -- Which is best for home use?

Sur la Table has a nice-looking 8 qt stock pot with an insert on sale for only $102.

http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO...

The 6 qt without the insert is $84.

http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO...

Nov 17, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware

COMMERCIAL COOKWARE -- Which is best for home use?

You do need at least an aluminum disc on the bottom to avoid scorching the fond. Such pots are not expensive.

Nov 17, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware

Clam Chowder in Clatsop County, Oregon

Bread bowl? That's a precious foodie innovation, I think. We've had actual porcelain bowls in the PNW for a very long time. There is no need to improvise.

It seems clear from that article that thickened clam chowder is a recent introduction to the PNW, probably brought by invaders from California. A lot of places are making thick chowder by dumping cornstarch in it or by making a thick flour-based roux. Of course people can make it anyway they want, but in my opinion such methods produce bad results (note the reference in the article to "paste" -- I'm not the only one who used that analogy).

There is only one authority on PNW clam chowder whom I recognize -- James Beard. His recipes do not call for flour or starch. Beard's chowder is the singular, quintessential PNW chowder.

Nov 17, 2014
GH1618 in Pacific Northwest

COMMERCIAL COOKWARE -- Which is best for home use?

Sure, engineers like copper. (I am an engineer.) But the first think you said you wanted was a stock pot, presumable for soups and stews. There is a substantial cost premium for getting a pot with copper in it, and I'll bet nobody can tell what kind of pot you cooked the soup in. A stainless pot with an aluminum disc in the bottom, and induction-compatible steel on the bottom, is the best value.

Nov 17, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware

COMMERCIAL COOKWARE -- Which is best for home use?

East Bay Restaurant Supply in Oakland has Vollrath. Vollrath has a tri-ply line (Tribute) which might suit you, as well as plain aluminum.

Nov 17, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware
1

Is canned pumpkin pie filling cheating?

It's best to use Libby's canned pumpkin. You add eggs, condensed milk and spices. Adjust the spices to your own liking.

Nov 17, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking
1

Crab . Your favorite ways to prepare ?

It's crab Louis with Dungeness for me. I put cold asparagus in mine, with tomato, egg, olives, and homemade dressing.

Nov 16, 2014
GH1618 in Home Cooking

Should I be offended over a frozen pie?

You should accept the hospitality offered graciously. If you can;t do that, don't accept the invitation in the first place.

COMMERCIAL COOKWARE -- Which is best for home use?

All-Clad MC2 is not pitched at designer kitchens. It is plain aluminum with a stainless steel lining. True commercial cookware is mostly all aluminum. You will not be harmed by cooking in aluminum, but if you don't like the idea MC2 seems a reasonable choice.

Nov 16, 2014
GH1618 in Cookware
1