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Best substitute for Thai curry chilies?

Thanks.. I like those Californias, use them in chili powder quite often, but you're right, not quite spicy enough... Think guajillo is closer to correct spice, but has too much unique character... Perhaps a blend of California/New Mexico & guajillo might work best...

Aug 27, 2012
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Best substitute for Thai curry chilies?

Actually, what is pictured there on foodsubs is not prik chee fa, it's a prik kee nu (the former means "sky pointing", the latter "mouseshit"...) Arbol and serrano are more similar to the latter... A red jalapeno might be the closest I can think of as far as fresh peppers in the West, I'm just thinking of dried... Guajillo is too particular in flavor, but similar looking...

This is what I'm talking about:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/thai-foo...

Aug 16, 2012
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Best substitute for Thai curry chilies?

Does anyone have any experience substituting more readily available Latin American chiles for the Thai long red chilies used in curry pastes (prik chee fa in Thai, also called sky-pointing or heaven-pointing chili). Not the small spicy mouseshit ones, the long, dried, not so spicy ones used in red curry, etc...

Was thinking a New Mexico might be close, but wanted to see if anyone had any actual experience... It looks like a cayenne, but I imagine that might be too spicy for this application...

Aug 16, 2012
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Suggest great classic French recipes to learn?

So, I've been cooking for years, and have gotten quite good, though I spent the large majority of that time being a vegetarian, which concentrated my learning mostly on Asian cuisines. Now that I've begun cooking with meat, I know my way around a good braise, make a mean stock, etc. so I think it's time to finally tackle some serious classical french cuisine, which I know squat about outside of the main sauces...

Problem is, I don't know where I should start. Can you guys suggest dishes I could make that really embody the essence of french cuisine? I think a list of 10 serious things to cook would give me one hell of an entry into the cuisine - I'm already planning duck confit and cassoulet...

Jan 06, 2012
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Tuna confit in pork fat...

I actually ended up cooking it at 118 degrees for 1 hour, 15 mins and it came out far better than I could have hoped (I ditched the sandwich and went with a Japanese prep). Very rare center, pork fat gave a nice, but not overwhelming flavor, and the texture was quite firm still (easily sliced) - very nice...

Dec 17, 2011
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Tuna confit in pork fat...

Yeah, I think I'm gonna do it at 140 for 10-15 minutes then... I was really only going for the long time to try to infuse more pork flavor from the fat, but if that's not going to work well, I'll just do it the normal way... Think I'll get a better texture at 140 than 110 anyway for what I'm going for... Thanks for the advice!

Dec 17, 2011
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Tuna confit in pork fat...

I was speaking of pasteurization in the sense that most confits are made to be preserved, and I don't plan on keeping any of this around, so I see no need for that high of a heat. Well, it may fall apart a little I'm sure that will happen, but that's kind of what I'm going for anyway. More like tuna rillettes, then, I guess... I'll see how it goes, but I'm going to go for an hour to really try to get the flavor of the pork fat into the tuna and see what happens... I've seen several blogs where people employed similar methods with reasonable looking results, so might as well give it a spin...

Dec 17, 2011
cheftwo in Home Cooking

What's for dinner? #119 [OLD]

I'm having my first tuna fish sandwich ever. I hate canned tuna and jarred mayo, so my compromise for my wife was to use tuna confit with dill pickle aioli instead, on a nice multigrain loaf from the local bakery. I'm still not sure I'm gonna dig it, but at least the smell doesn't make me want to puke.

Dec 17, 2011
cheftwo in Home Cooking

Tuna confit in pork fat...

I'm thinking of rendering some leftover guanciale and using the fat to confit some tuna steaks for a "tunafish" sandwich (though I hate canned tuna, so the need to replicate the texture is not there). I'm curious if anyone has any suggestions about time and temperature for cooking (I'm going to sous vide in the fat) - if cooking a tuna steak, I'd probably cook to 110deg, and I don't particularly need to pasteurize in this instance, so it's purely a question of texture. Wonder what would happen if I cooked it at 110 for an hour or three in the pork fat?

Most tuna confit I see is cooked at around 150deg and only for 5-10 minutes, but again, I think that's a pasteurization thing, any suggestions on what temp would be best and what texture would be best to shoot for here?

Dec 17, 2011
cheftwo in Home Cooking