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Lyle's Golden Syrup in Pecan Pie: Bad move

Share your recipe??? Thanks!

Aug 23, 2013
UtahMom54 in Home Cooking

Lyle's Golden Syrup in Pecan Pie: Bad move

P.S. From Utah Mom to Danna. With the Lyle's Golden Syrup, you use brown sugar instead of the white sugar that called for in the recipe. I used white "C&H" cane sugar with the "Lyle's Golen Syrup" and the "Steen's 100% cane syrup.

Aug 23, 2013
UtahMom54 in Home Cooking

Lyle's Golden Syrup in Pecan Pie: Bad move

For Danna...My son wanted pecan pie for his B-Day, so I made him 5 pies using my favorite recipe (the one on the dark Karo syrup bottle as follows) but substituted the dark Karo syrup with various other kinds of syrup--made two of them with "Lyle's Golden Syrup," (can get from Harmon's in Utah), made two with Steen's 100% Cane Syrup (can get 16 oz. bottles on Amazon), and one with "Pure Maple Syrup" from Costco. They all set up just fine and were all very good. Those 5 pies didn't last very long. It was fun to see the differences in the way the pies tasted! Me and my children liked the pies made from "Steen's 100% Cane Syrup," probably because it tasted the most like the pecan pies that I have made in the past with dark Karo syrup. We won't use dark Karo again until they produce an organic version, because we won't eat GMO food, i.e. corn, cottonseed, canola, sugar beet sugar, or soy or their food derivatives anymore. My husband liked the pies made from "Lyle's Golden Syrup" which had 1-1/2 c. nuts best. The one made with the 100% maple syrup was best the 2nd day.

Here's the recipe I used if you want to give it a try:

1 unbaked 9 inch pastry shell
3 eggs
1 c. Karo dark corn syrup (Substitute: Steen's 100% Cane syrup (get on Amazon 10 oz bottle), pure maple syrup (Costco), or Lyle's Golden Syrup (Harmon's in Utah carries.)
1 c. sugar (C&H cane sugar)
2 T. butter, melted (use Kirkland non-RBST butter)
1 t. vanilla
1/8 t. salt
1 c. pecans (sliced by hand)

Beat eggs slightly. Mix in next 5 ingredients, then stir in 1/2 c. of the nuts (can use lowest setting on mixer--stir setting). Pour into unbaked pie shell. Sprinkle remaining 1/2 c. of nuts over the top of the filling. Bake in 400 degree oven for 15 minutes. Set oven temperature control at 350 degrees and continue baking for 30 to 35 minutes. (Filling should be slightly less set in center than around edge.) Makes 1 pie. Cover edges of crust with tin foil ring or pie pan rim covers (get at Walmart).

"Pie Crust"

1 1/2 times the recipe for two pies. I love this recipe, because it offsets the sweetness of the pecan pies. It's super easy to make and always turns out perfect.

2 c. all-purpose flour
1 t. sale
1/2 c. salad oil (I use extra light olive oil, which works great.)
5 T. cold water

Stir together flour and salt. Pour salad oil and cold water into measuring cup (do not stir). Add all at once to the flour mixture. Stir lightly with fork. Form into 2 balls; flatten dough slightly.

Roll each between two 12-inch square of waxed paper. (first dampen the table slightly so paper won't slip.) When dough is rolled in circle to edges of paper, it will the right thickness for crust. Peel off top sheet of waxed paper and fit dough, paper side up, into pie plate. Remove paper. Gently press pastry to fit dough, seal any tears. Cut pastry about 1 inch beyond edge of pie plate. Roll pastry under (like pizza edge, except smaller roll) to make a double thickness edge. Press dough in with right index finger against index finger and thumb of left hand to form the fluted edge. This recipe makes enough pastry for one 8 or 9 inch double crust pie. To make two pecan pies, I usually 1 1/2 times this pie crust recipe.

I hope you like it! The pie made with maple syrup tasted best the 2nd day!

Aug 23, 2013
UtahMom54 in Home Cooking

sugar- beet vs pure cane

Just gotta say that 95% of the beet sugar grown in the U.S. comes from GMO plants now. Plants/beets have been sprayed with Roundup. The biggest difference for me is whether or not I want to have Roundup with my sugar. With emptying our house of GMO food, and replacing all our beet sugar with cane sugar, we compared the taste difference too. Cane sugar tastes sweeter and doesn't go a funky color when it gets wet going down the drain. There's also Creme Brulee, which won't caramelize if you use beet sugar; it will just burn. Cane sugar gives superior results in cooking and baking, and since it has not been sprayed with Roundup, it is the best choice IMHO.

Jan 31, 2013
UtahMom54 in Home Cooking

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

Great idea to post pictures Donna52479! If anyone here knows how to do that, please share!!! I'd love to see your kitchens and how they turned out!

Oct 02, 2012
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

KrusingKatie, That antibacterial component is a chemical (most likely Microban aka Triclosan). It is not a RN. It won't prevent you from getting sick. It just keeps anything from growing in your silestone. Pretty sure I don't like the idea of chemicals in food surfaces. I read about it here:

http://safemama.com/2010/07/14/parent...

From the link...
"Considering the things we know about Triclosan (Lab studies link triclosan to cancer, developmental defects, and liver and inhalation toxicity), there may be cause for concern. Triclosan is a possible hormone disruptor and is basically a pesticide which should be avoided when possible as well."

Sounds like this is one of the reasons you don't have to seal it! Think about it...it's crushed quartz (natural stone) .

Sep 21, 2012
UtahMom54 in Cookware

jam or jelly - no added sugar?

I just bought every flavor of "Simply Fruit" by Smucker's at Macey's Groc. store in Orem, UT. I'm on the 17 Day Diet, sugar is not allowed. You can buy "Simply Fruit" online at Smuckers.com too. I love it! I just tried blackberry "Simply Fruit" for the first time, and it was over the top! Thank you Smuckers for making such a delicious and much better for you product. I am going to stir some in my Greek yogurt, as the diet allows this and it sounds so much better for you too than all that sugared fruit at the bottom of most greek yogurt. I absolutely love Costco's "Fage" brand greek yogurt--the creamiest of all and their fruit flavored has 2 to 3 grams less sugar than the "Chobani" brand. It's better than ice cream IMHO.

Sep 16, 2012
UtahMom54 in General Topics

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

Most suppliers now quote "Black Galaxy" granite as a grade 3--one step up from Carrara marble, which is usually a grade 2. What color are your cabinets MikeLM? Wondering if black countertops would close things in my kitchen??? I strongly considered it at one point, but was concerned it would make my kitchen too dark--I have cherry cabinets and Brazilian Cherry floors, both have aged a little darker now than it was when installed. "Black Galaxy" is actually not granite but is actually basalt or lava rock--maybe that's why it sucks up the heat. Very beautiful--I agree! I was going to do Corian, but changed my mind when the quotes came in--only $200 more for Carrara marble--I know marble is a "no, no" for many, but I saw polished Carrara in a kitchen after it had been lived in (3 small children ate on island bar every day, pizza once a week on it, lime juice, etc.) for a year and there was no staining and 1/4" to 1/2" small etch marks that didn't even bother me, cause all I saw was the beautiful marble!

Mar 25, 2012
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

MarieKenny, All marble will etch with acidic foods, although some are harder to stain than others. The deal breaker against Cararra for me was I had a new non-burning red candle that got put on a 6 inch sample of Cararra marble. I'm pretty good at getting any kind of stain out of anything, but nothing would take this stain out. The only think I didn't try a warm iron and paper towels which might have worked, as I understand it works to get out candle wax out of tablecloths. Now, if you don't mind the etching, you might consider Vermont marble or Greek marble as they are harder and more stain resistant. Some of the Greek marble looks very similar to Cararra. See this link:

https://www.google.com/search?q=greek...

I was strongly considering Greek marble per Holly (Int. Designer) with "Things That Inspire" blog's recommendations as follows, but decided against because of the etching issues: Here's her e-mail reply to me in Nov. 2011 about her experience with it in her kitchen, which might prove helpful to you if you're set on marble:

Hi Eve-

Yes, I did end up going with marble in the kitchen. However, instead of Italian marble, I used Greek marble. There is a place in Atlanta that represents the quarries in Greece, and a blog reader told me about it. Greek marble is different than Italian marble; it is less absorbent than granite, and harder than granite. Instead of the wave like patterns that you see in Italian marble, it has ripples - so it looks different, but I love the look. It is very peaceful looking, very white appearance.

Believe it or not, Greek marble does not stain! I am very good about cleaning up my counters after cooking and after meals, so I tend to clean things up right away if they spill, but I have spilled tomato sauce, BBQ sauce, tea, etc on the marble and no staining at all. The marble guy said that one of his clients made a tombstone for his dog out of the marble that I have in my kitchen, and even after years in the Georgia red clay, no staining. It does etch as all marble etches, so we have some water rings. Luckily, based on the sunlight exposure in my kitchen, you only really see it from a certain angle. I try to be careful about acids - lemon juice, orange juice, vinegar - and I have a cutting board near my sink, but so far so good. I cook a fair amount, but I have only been in the house for 2 months so time will tell.

The stone guy sealed my countertops with a really good sealer, and told me to look at ingredients on spray cleaners to make sure that there are no acids (many cleaners have acids, so do many of the soaps). I clean my counters either with plain water, or Method lavender scent.

I did caesarstone in the downstairs laundry room (in misty carrera color), and did corian in the upstairs laundry room (in rice paper color), and I love both of these surfaces - they are truly indestructible. Many designers in Atlanta use caesarstone for kitchens, in a 5 cm thickness. It just didn't fit with the French feel of my house, so I went with the Greek marble.

There is a Vermont marble that is also very, very hard and doesn't stain - Imperial Danby. It has that rippled, subtle look that is different than Italian marble but still pretty.

I do think that granite is a great surface if you can get one that you like, because it does not react to acids. It just wasn't the look that I wanted.

Also, as far as scratches are concerned, I have not noticed any scratching - I have a honed surface - and I also did marble in my master bathroom (polished). My corian in the old house was very scratched up, but it was also 23 years since it was installed.

Best of luck in your search! Cote de Texas just did a post on marble, and Mrs. Howard personal shopper just did a post too. People feel very torn about marble. My marble guy said he would never put Italian marble in a kitchen - he would only do Greek marble and Vermont marble because of their hardness and their different composition.

- Holly

Dec 29, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

MadMacStew, Per my extensive research, the radon in granite is a problem when it is in your house, not in the ground. The reason being that our homes are built to be airtight, which keeps the radon gases building up indoors that are continually being released from the deteriorating stone. Granite and quartzite both release radon, marble does not, as it is primarily calcium, but it's also unsuitable for kitchens with etching, staining, high maintenance issues. Even if it's crushed up quartzite like that used in surfaces like silestone the "possible" radon issues made me too nervous to consider it, I have read that if you have had cancer, why increase your risk when there are options that don't release any radon. My DH had thyroid cancer 13 years ago and had to have his thyroid gland removed and takes synthroid, which has produced setbacks for him! Consequently, I shy away from exposing my family to any unnecessary radon. I do know that some high end builders are putting in outside air recirculation systems that recycle fresh air from outdoors into the home. I suppose opening a window might help the radon gases to escape for those who have it and are concerned. I also understand that some granites have higher levels of radon than others. For example, some with red in the stone have more radon. If you have granite, you can research levels found in your particular stone or have it tested. Also, in recent news homes built with concrete floors get more radon in homes (can get a substantial amount from even a pinhole crack in a basement floor) than homes build up on blocks, etc. Do you know if homes in Aberdeen, Scotland are built up on blocks with the air space in between them and the earth? Thanks for the info on coal. We have gas fireplaces, but used to burn coal occasionally in a wood burning stove in a former home.

Dec 29, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

Skyline, I think some of the people on this site may be using the name "Corian" synonymously with a myriad of other fly by the night solid surface countertops, which were inferior to actual Corian. My Corian kitchen is in the bsmt. apartment of my home, which we rent. With all the abuse of 10 years of different renters about annually, I have only had the countertops buffed out once for a "series of fork stab marks" a tenants' son put in the island. My countertops and the Corian cutting board looked like new again after the buffing and it cost only a nominal service charge. Otherwise, no scratches. I am pretty sure that you can't do that with quartz, which I've read also emits radon like granite; since it is approximately 95 percent ground natural quartz with 5 percent polymer resins. Another biggie for Corian is that I think it's a lot easier to clean up than natural stone. I have deliberately left food on some natural stone--granite & marble samples and Corian samples to compare how hard it would be to get raspberry jam off after it sat there for a few hours. I have moderate arthritis in my hands, which I think scrubbing the tile kitchen countertops upstairs contributed to, so ease of clean ability is important to me. I tested granite (jam came off with harder scrubbing) and marble (which was similar in cleanabilty but it also etched). A red non- burning candle sat on the marble sample overnight and left a red stain that I haven't been able to get out with anything. I did not put quartz to this "ease of clean ability" test, but would expect about the same as the granite--clean up wise with possibly less staining. I am remodeling the upstairs kitchen and will probably put the "Glacier White Corian" in it too. I have cherry cabinets and brazilian cherry hardwood floors in my upstairs kitchen.

Dec 05, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

lrobertsrnccm, I think I am a walking encyclopedia on all the different countertop materials now. I've researched this to death. It is really important to find an experienced fabricator with natural stone and any other countertop surface for that matter. Lowe's and Home Depot make a 17% - 21% markup, so you can usu. find Corian and natural stone, for less money than they will sell it to you by finding a local countertop installer/dealer. The big box stores and many other stores like them are the middle man and will get their cut. If you will get 3 bids once you decide what you want, you will see that you can get an experienced fabricator and still get a very good price. I only have experience with cast iron and stainless sinks. I hate my white cast iron sink--have to scrub it daily with Comet--though it is seemingly indestructible still after 17 years of use, with only a few nicks from pots. If you go stainless, my experienced fabricator of 30 year said it is very important to make sure has a high nickel and chrome content and that is even more important than the gauge. I like Elkay--deep sinks. I have one in my laundry room that has been in since 1994 and it still looks great--very few scratches and it's used a lot. I put an Elkay SS sink in my basement apartment too; and with 10 years of various tenants, it is pretty scratched up but doesn't have any dents. Both were top quality and heavy gauge sinks. I will do it again and plan to use clear rubber mats or wire racks in them in my upstairs kitchen to prevent scratches in my remodel that I am embarking on currently. I don't know much about the granite sinks--stone yards sell them and like them. I would be concerned about the staining and porosity.

Nov 12, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

Syoder, I think you are correct! I have "Glazier White" Corian and feel it is timeless and near bulletproof. All the dealers will try to up sell you or talk you into the look a likes/imitation things saying they're considerably less expensive. I won't let them, because I know how "low maintenance" and pretty the "Corian Glacier White" is and you can see things on the countertop--they don't get lost on it. My cabinets are medium dark cherry wood and that's a classic look. My walls are white too. Floor tile is 12 inch square gray and white marble look with narrow smooth grout joint. Next to zip maintenance on all and still loving it after 10+ yearst!

Nov 12, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

P.S. Regarding the Corian maintenance, I did ask each tenant to not put hot pots directly on it and not cut on the countertop. I assume most didn't cut on the countertops from the way the Corian cutting board looked. At any rate, taking out the fork marks on the island, and some other minor scratches on the countertops, buffing them to look like new and buffing the cutting board to new looking condition too only cost me a service call, which as I recall was around $150--not bad maintenance costs for 10+ years and to get new looking countertops.

Nov 12, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

For Joseph and the Corian people here, I have "Glacier White" Corian in the kitchen of our basement accessory apartmen. Best thing I ever did in a rental. We've rented the apartment for about 1 year each time to 10 different renters now, and have only had to buff out scratches once from fork marks done by the tenants child. The Corian looks like "almost new" right now. I have dark cherry cabinets and the contrast is classic elegance. I put in a full height Corian backsplash and ran the Corian into the window sil too. Total maintenance free and super easy cleanup! Am currently redoing my tile countertops upstairs and was really wanting marble, so I did some abuse to a 6" sample tile of "Bianco Cararra" marble. I sliced a banana on it (no scratching). I put ketchup, mustard, vinegar, raspberry jam on it. Everything etched, although I could minimize the etching by using "Bar Keepers Friend" powder on it and rubbing a little, but worked only if I did it immediately. Acidic food left on a long time etching still stayed after polishing. I put all the same stuff on the white Corian and left for hours. Came back and wiped up--no stains. I have some very faint scratches on the Corian rental kitchen, but nothing serious. My tenants over the years have been pretty abusive to the apartment--tons of scratches in the stainless steel sink, but the Corian has survived the abuse very well. Maybe it's the "Glacier White" color--still not tired of the look either after 10 years. I don't like the patterned Corian, as I think it has an imitation cheap look. "Glazier White" is the cheapest Corian color too! I am STRONGLY considering putting it in the upstairs kitchen now too! The installer put in 1/4" thick Corian on the backsplash, which looks very nice and doesn't take out a lot of the countertop space too. No issues with Corian! One tenant left a bright reddish pink stain behind that I couldn't seem to get out with regular cleaners, I ended up using using denatured alcohol on it. Stain came out and no damage to the Corian. It's fabulous and warm to the touch when the weather is cold. I think other countertops surfaces are nice too--just had to defend Corian, because I've had a great experience with it!

Nov 12, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware

Countertop material: granite vs. solid surface (corian) vs. engineered stone (silestone)

Marie, The interior decorator (Holly) on "Things That Inspire" site told me that Greek marble is as hard as granite, so it doesn't scratch as easily as the Italian marbles. It will still etch, but you can eliminate half your problems by using a hard marble. Holly said her fabricator told her he would only put Greek or Vermont marble in a kitchen, because they are much harder than the others. I think this is it: http://www.quarry-select.com/?gclid=C...

Nov 12, 2011
UtahMom54 in Cookware