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ParisPatisseries's Profile

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Chocolate in Paris! help?

I will second PhilD's suggestion that you head to Paris and start visiting the shops, but perhaps hold off for a bit on asking for a stage there. Spend a few weeks becoming familiar with their work, and get friendly with the sales staff. Not many of the chocolatiers work in the sales area of their own shops, but some do - like Michel Chaudun. So wether you get to know the sales folks or the chocolatier himself that way, it will make for a much smoother transition when you go, "I love your work, and I'd love to do a stage here." Your school or instructors might have some good connections, too, so sniff around.

Definitely look into the visa requirements. It might be best to head there as a student, taking French classes and then, if you get a job, take it as an unpaid stage -- cause it's unlikely you can find a paid one anyway.

I'd also suggest familiarizing yourself with chocolates, by producer and by origin. I've heard of people being tested with chocolate tastings, and if you can go, "That tastes like a porcelana...", you could be seen as quite an asset beyond just doing day-to-day production.

Until then, start studying French. And, most importantly, watch as many French movies as you can all the time - to help get yourself used to it spoken. When a chef is lecturing you with, "L'union de la crème et du chocolat se fait grâce à des molécules...", you want to follow it.

Dec 11, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Good Chocolate Shops in Paris- suggestions?

Roland lists some excellent ones there, and here is a list of some others from parisbymouth.com: http://bit.ly/roiutt

Dec 11, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Five days five pastry shops. Where should we go and what should we eat? [Paris]

Yes, that's Jean-Luc Poujauran's place. Secco took it over and added a pastry section to the old boulangerie.

Nov 22, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Five days five pastry shops. Where should we go and what should we eat? [Paris]

I am going to 4th that non-recommendation of Secco. Their cheesecake gets so much attention, but I've never thought it was all that special ... good, just not too interesting. It's really more of a good neighborhood shop for that part of the 7ème, akin to Mulot in his part of the 6ème. Of course Mulot is being surrounded by haute pâtisseries, so I'm not sure what will ultimately become of him; business is still pretty brisk though.

Nov 20, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Five days five pastry shops. Where should we go and what should we eat? [Paris]

Sadaharu Aoki is great. I'm often hesitant about pointing people there, as the flavors can be a little shocking. The "Zen" piece in your photo, in particular, is very alcoholic and heavy with black sesame -- great for someone who enjoys those flavors, but perhaps too wild for someone just casually picking it from the case. His black sesame eclair is great and is a lighter approach to the flavor, minus the alcohol. His caramel tarte, yuzu tarte, choux vanille, Fuwa Fuwa Passion, cheesecake, and Sudachi are pretty excellent and palatable for most. I also like his Bamboo and the violet macarons, though both can be a little challenging for some.

Nov 08, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Five days five pastry shops. Where should we go and what should we eat? [Paris]

I agree. Monsieur Hermé has one of the finest croissants around. I'm also fond of Blé Sucré, Bread & Roses and Gontran Cherrier, when it comes to croissants . . . but, yeah, PH might well be the most consistent. They're always there every morning at 10 and get snapped-up pretty fast. Good stuff!

Nov 07, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Five days five pastry shops. Where should we go and what should we eat? [Paris]

I listed Pierre Hermé and Ladurée because they're the ones so many know . . . and if a person comes back from France others are like, "Well you did go to Hermé and Ladurée, right?" only to hear "No.", then they can make someone feel silly for missing out. It's kind of like how you need to eat Godiva chocolate so that you can name-drop Amedei, Domori, Bernachon, etc. with impunity. But I agree PH and L are not the best.

And, yeah. Carl Marletti is great. Super nice guy . . . and he's got great pieces. Assuming you're down on the Rue Mouffetard, he's the perfect spot to hit-up. Dominique Saibron is always a fun visit, too. The head pastry chef there, Franck, is a nice guy and loves what he does. Nothing like passion getting baked into things.

And, yes, Pouchkine is tricky. If there's such a thing as too pretty, they might be guilty. I think the main problem is the staff. While they've warmed up, I think the crowds of customers really take their toll. I used to go in the morning when no one was there, and it was pretty relaxed. Then I visited one afternoon, and it was a circus. Poor ladies. But try and give them another shot. Their vanilla croissant is amazing, and they have some of the most perfectly formed macarons around. I'd also sell my soul for some of their pastries ;)

Nov 07, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France

Five days five pastry shops. Where should we go and what should we eat? [Paris]

You're literally my hero ;) That made me laugh so hard. I will have to ask Perrine if there's been an uptick in réglisse requests. I know I caused a clementine shortage there, by referencing them too often on my site, so I'm hoping your efforts help hasten the return of the réglisse macaron. Thank you!

Nov 07, 2011
ParisPatisseries in France