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Steak knives....

Hi Kelly12.

I have a set of Wusthof classic steak knives and have mixed feelings about them. They’re not elegant enough for fine china dining, yet too pricey / fancy for everyday /backyard use. Cutting against a plate, and / or treating them like silverware (scooped up, tossed in the sink or dishwasher) mauls them.

I suggest getting two sets. For everyday use…something like the Victorinox b/c cheap enough to replace / not fester over scratches. For fine dining…get something nice that matches your china, and treat them like knives – not silverware.

BTW, like Sabatier, Laguiole is not an exclusive brand name. Many manufactures make them; including a lot of crappy knock-offs. The good ones are made in France from Forge de Laguiole.

Apr 08, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

12" chef knives

If you have the space and handling skills, a 12" chef's knife will be more efficient at handling large objects (watermelons, cabbages), and doing things in bulk (2 or 3 whole things of celery at the same time) than an 10" or 8"' but it will also be harder to do tip cuts. You'll likely loose some agility as well. The 12" model, generally tends to be beefier/ heavier than the 10"; everything is bigger.

Apr 07, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

I need to replace my chef's knife. Brand suggestions?

I was just pointing out the replacement cost isn't free. As for the knives, I played with one briefly and didn't think too highly of it. More so, after hearing the price for a 440a blade steel.

Mar 21, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

I need to replace my chef's knife. Brand suggestions?

As per Cutco website, they'll replace at 50% off the list price. So you can get a 9" chef's knife ( made out of 440a steel) for $150, and replace it as many times as you like for $75.

Mar 21, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Dating vintage Henckels carbon steel chef knife

I've seen some bad ones (messed up blades & a lot of surface rust / maybe deep pitting) for ~ $25, as well as nice ones (minor surface rust) for ~$75.

Yours looks like it's in great shape, did you get a good deal on it?

Mar 21, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Please tell me that I don't need a sushi knife

Traditional single bevel knives are supposedly very difficult to make / grind, correctly; with an usuba the most challenging. Although the better ones don’t have the blatant bending, warping, and overgrinds issues that poorly made ones commonly have, and may appear ok (flat / true / straight), it needs to be “opened” or sharpened on stones for the first time to become really ok.

Flattening the backside is part of the opening process…only needs to be done once. The objective is to get the backside on the knife to sit flat, only grinding away the metal surrounding the concave section…the dotted line in the Korin pic. DO NOT flatten out the concave section. Once done, I only touch the backside when sharpening / de-burring on a finishing stone. BTW, I believe uraoshi sharpening is meant to restore or deepen the concave area itself.

Also note, C is not a big flat bevel. It’s actually a hamaguri / clamshell / compound bevel. It’s common to have at least two bevels (one from the edge to the cladding line and one from the cladding line to the shinogi line) , and perhaps a third + in between.

Jan 28, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Damascus chefs knife

Yup, I have several and would not have bought them if a
non damascus version were available. It's a lot like a black colored car...very pretty when new or spit shined, but a pita to keep nice looking.

Jan 23, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Damascus chefs knife

<FWIW, the printing on the knives themselves say they're manufactured in the US.>
Hmmm, I wonder what role (if any) All Clads’ pots & pans expertise and manufacturing facilities had in making these knives.

<I'm still lost as to why someone would be cool with a knife manufactured in Germany but not Japan.>
Could be a number reasons…preference, perception or ignorance. Before converting, I was guilty of the later two. After converting, I still keep a few German blades for those odd-ball jobs that would likely mess up a jknife…splitting lobsters, quartering chickens, chopping chocolate, etc.

Jan 23, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Damascus chefs knife

Thanks Chem, for some reason i always thought Macs weren't made in Japan.

Jan 22, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Damascus chefs knife

Their HQ is in CA, but i'm not sure where their knives are actually made. IIRC, Macs' steels / HRC / grinds are more western than Japanese.

Jan 22, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Damascus chefs knife

A DT,Masamoto Honyaki, and a Shigefusa...holy crap!

Jan 22, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Damascus chefs knife

Except for high end / custom guys ( like...M.Carter, D.Thomas, B. Kramer, etc.), the only USA knife manufactures that i'm aware of are Mac Knives (CA), Dexter-Russell, and Lamson (MA).

<Does anyone have any experience or opinion of the All-Clad knife line?>
I'm not familiar with them,but i highly doubt these are actually made by All-Clad. More than likely, they're OEM'd by or for All-Clad.

Jan 22, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Are Victorinox Knives Best Bang For Buck?

Forshner / Victorinox are the least expensive, most decent knives that I know of. They're a great choice for those on a tight budget, or just starting out. However, the steel being rather soft, dulls easily and will need to be honed / sharpened frequently. With your budget, your better off upgrading the chef's knife as it will likely get the most use, get you better performance and a longer usage lifespan.

Full tangs maybe useful for outdoor or hard usage knives, but the theoritcal additional strength and weight is not needed for a kitchen knives. The blade itself is going to break way before you pry or do whatever enough to damage a partial, let alone full tang.

Jan 15, 2014
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

Hades. I’m in headless chicken mode, but will try to come up with some options for you later. Alas, many of the better knives are made in limited quantities & tend to sell out quickly. However they maybe gearing up / receiving new stock for the xmas run.

FYI, the blade length of wa (broomstick) handled knives includes the machi (part of the blade between the heel and handle)… yo (western) handle knives are measured from heel to tip. Therefor, the actually cutting length of 210mm WA is ~ 185mm / YO is 210mm. Some brands, make their YO handle model thicker or stouter than their WA handle model.

Just to confirm your needs….
A) Edge retention and sharpening difficulty go hand in hand. So, on a scale of 1-5 w/ 5 == most edge retention & hardest to sharpen, you’re looking for a blade steel in the 4 or 5 range…right?
B) Weight class; On a scale of 1-5 w/ 1= featherweight, 2= light/laser, 3 = medium, 4= workhorse, 5 = a std german chef’s knife, you’re looking for a 4?

Nov 26, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

My fetish with White and Blue  has to with their balance / combination of attributes ==  high sharp level, low angle/thin edge stability,  easy to sharpen,  and don't chip - unless I do something stupid.

I've played with a few super steel pocket knives, although they hold beefy, toothier edge for quite some, they couldn't do an acute angle, polished edge.  

Nov 25, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

You're killing me, chem :). As soon as i'm finished cleaning the kitchen, it's sharpening time!!!! Why oh why did we buy these stupid stainless steel appliances...feaking finger prints everywhere.

Nov 25, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

I can't say for sure they're getting paid, but i strongly believe they're receiving some sort of benefit.   Perhaps  products and discounts, and / or sub contractor work.  LOL, yeah they ain't gonna call out a turd, but will put lipstick on a pig :)

Nov 25, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

I'm not familiar with the konosuke ginsan, but few things stood out...
A) It seems to be quite stout and 225 grams for a 200 mm blade is rather heavier for japanese chef's knife.
B) That big secondary bevel / thick spine is akin to traditional single bevel knife with a double-edge. On the plus side, it makes thinning and sharpening easier, and will do well with meats, but will wedge on dense foods.
C) Gin-3/ Ginsanko is kinda like an easier to sharpen version VG-10 without the chippyness and similiar edge retention.

Nov 25, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

True dat! The steels' tempering, ability of the maker get it right makes a world of difference. I haven't gotten my hands on a honyaki blade, but my W1 and B1 feel harder and have better edge retention than my W2 and B2.

Nov 25, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

Don't drink the kool-aid.  Most ( if not all) of those CKTG videos, product reviews, and responses from their website and forum are all from the same handful of people / "shills" who are getting paid to hype their products while pretending to be regular consumers.  Be extra careful with their exclusive products &richmond branded knives. There's been some reported issues w/ questionable HT, pictures of ubber thick blades with almost no tapering, and horrendous grinds. 

I suggest reaching out to Jon @ japaneseknifeimports.  He's an ex chef, knife nerd with a wealth of hands experiences and knowledge about the pros and cons of different brands and individual  knives.  He doesn't oversell, and will point out which product best fit your needs...even if he doesn't carry it. 

Nov 25, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

I would say 3 or 4 is about right. An individual characteristics breakdown may be more telling, from low to high...
Edge retention  : W2...W1.B2...B1
Edge acuteness : B2...B1.W2...W1 ( Holy Crap sharp!)
Sharpening effort : W2...B2.W1...B1

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

From what I've read, SG-2 and SKD-11 are likely 4's on a scale of 1-5 w/ 5 == latest & greatest super steel. The difference being SG-2 has better refined edge abilities but lower edge retention.  Whereas, SKD-11 has greater edge retention, but lesser refined edge characteristics.  But, I maybe wrong.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Wusthof Classic Fine Edge Nakiri Knife? Any good?

Awesome, it sounds like you're well on your way towards knife nerd land. Don't forget a starter jknife will give you a taste of higher end blades, and more importantly not punish you for doing something you shouldn't do if and when you decide to advance further.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

toitkshwa21 knife rust..

Absolutely, different carbon steels and patina maturity makes a huge difference. Wiping the blade down, is second nature for me...I even do it with stainless :).

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

Need the Knife Gods of Chowhound to opine! ISO one Chef's knife!

I'm not familiar with that knife,but in general, white steel can get sharper, and hold a more acute edge, but has the lowest edge retention of the hitachi carbons. You trade edge acuteness / low angle stability for more edge retention by going from white to blue to super blue.

It sounds like you want a medium weight workhorse, SS w/ more edge retention than SG2, damascus bling.....hmmm...check out the yoshikane skd or sld line.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

toitkshwa21 knife rust..

Yup, BKF also leaves a funky grey haze. Bon ami or baking powder takes longer,but it doesn't mess up the blade finish.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

toitkshwa21 knife rust..

Yup, that's the gist of it. I've found a forced patina works better by lightly scrubbing the blade with a scotch bright, wash it with warm soapy water, heat the blade with boiling hot water. Apply the mustard, white vinegar, etc, wait for it to turn grey to black, wash it / don't scrub, reheat....repeat as many times as needed. Many light layers are better than fewer thick layers.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

toitkshwa21 knife rust..

....She has to wipe DURING usage as well? How in the world does that work exactly...?

I normally, just have a damp towel next to me and will periodically wipe the blade / cutting board. The blade steel and patina maturity, will dictate how frequently you need to do it.

....1. Should I have bought the oil and had her use it from the get-go?
Some carbons are a PITA and need it, others are fine without it.

....2. What’s the process for using this oil? (ie Does she use the knife, then wash it, then dry it, then apply the oil, then lastly store it

Yup.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

toitkshwa21 knife rust..

Carbon steel knives will rust, if left wet or dirty for a prolonged period of time. They should be wiped with a damp towel, periodically while in use - especially with acid foods (onions, lemons, etc.), and properly cleaned & completely dry after each use. If needed, put a light coating of Camilla oil on the blade for the first couple of weeks or until the patina matures.

The Tojiro ITK, supposedly has some issues with a) Kurouchi finish flaking off and b) cladding itself is very reactive, rust magnet.

For minor rust spots, just clean the area with a mild abrasive cleanser (bon ami) or mr. clean magic eraser…wash, wipe the blade really, really dry and lightly oil it.

If it’s rusting immediately or if the Kurouchi finish (the black part) is flacking off, you may need to sand the entire blade down to bare metal, and form a patina (naturally or forced) and /or oil it.

Nov 23, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware

global confusion

Three times a charm?

Nov 19, 2013
JavaBean in Cookware