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WayTooSerious's Profile

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Best knives?

I was "corrected" IRL. The Cutco carving knife can make very thin slices without mangling. The serrated Cutco carver is just fine for delicate slicing.
I was "doing it wrong." hehe

CUTCO, however, does accept returns for 100% if a customer is dissatisfied for any reason... but I haven't tried.

Sep 27, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

Brisket Without Fat---Doomed to be Stringy?

You could add a LITTLE suet to the braise and brush the top of the brisket occasionally if the brisket does not submerge.

You might be able to return to the butcher and get a little suet (beef fat) free of charge, since he'd left you no fat on the brisket. I think that a butcher should ask "how much fat do you want" on every cut that you buy.

Covering with onions is also an excellent technique.
When not smoking a brisket, I like to use enough braise and melted fat to submerge the meat during cooking and then reduce the braise in a sauce pan (separately) after cooking.

Sep 27, 2011
WayTooSerious in Home Cooking

What kind of kitchen knives do you use?

We also have not had to have our Cutco knives sharpened, and my mother has had her set of Cutco knives since the 1960's. We do maintain the edges with steel and the CUTCO sharpener, however; but never have we sent them away to be sharpened.

Sep 27, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

What kind of kitchen knives do you use?

Surely, you also don't cook things with bones harder to cut than pennies.
:)

Sep 27, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

Best knives?

Sorry for the miscommunication. I had talked about two kinds of sharpening, and I didn't specify which kind of sharpening my knives didn't need.

Indeed, I regularly "sharpen" or "maintain" the straight-edge knives.

I meant to convey that I've never had any of the CUTCO *serrated-edge* knives need the "send-in-your-serrated-knives-for-sharpening" kind of sharpening.

I've also not needed to send in straight edge knives for sharpening.

What I ultimately meant to convey, but was unclear about, was:
I've never needed to send any knives to CUTCO, neither serrated-edge nor straight-edge, for sharpening.

------
TO THE O.P.:
In contrast to the negativity that they've otherwise received in this thread, CUTCO knives have performed satisfactorily for me at home.
I have used and like both Henkel and CUTCO. I recommend both brands.

Sep 27, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

Best knives?

Henkel's International series is inexpensive and fantastic, IMO.
The carving knife can easily make the thinnest slices whereas CUTCO's version of a carving knife is serrated and mangles any delicate meat slicing.

Sep 26, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

Best knives?

CUTCO also has a forever return policy. If you are EVER dissatisfied with them, you may return them.

Sep 26, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

Best knives?

Cutco sells a knife sharpener, and sharpening any straight-edge CUTCO knife does NOT void the warranty. However, like the Henkels and other brands, damage to serrated edges from sharpening is considered abuse.
CUTCO knives have a "FOREVER warranty" (100% ) for damage resulting from normal use and a 50% guarantee for damage resulting from abuse.
Yes... if you break the knife on purpose, they will replace it at half the cost.

I've never had any of my CUTCO knives even need sharpening, and they were used frequently from 1968. One French Chef knife was replaced because it chipped while chopping rock-hard-frozen broccoli after many times doing the same. CUTCO deemed this as normal use and replaced the ONE French Chef knife with TWO French Chef knives so my mother would not be unhappy with the knife after so long being a customer - (40 years)

I have both CUTCO and Henkel, and I prefer some CUTCO knives to the Henkel counterparts, and prefer some Henkel knives to the CUTCO counterparts.

Sep 26, 2011
WayTooSerious in Cookware

Vegetarians craving bacon/pork? Nutritional explanation?

An interesting experiment would be to bring some bacon to isolated and bacon-less societies and observe if the people there like the smell and like the bacon.

Sep 26, 2011
WayTooSerious in General Topics

Vegetarians craving bacon/pork? Nutritional explanation?

He displays great knowledge; and thus, maybe he deftly chose his humorous username.

gad·fly Noun
1. A fly that bites livestock, esp. a horsefly, warble fly, or botfly.
2. A person, esp. ONE WHO PROVOKES OTHERS INTO ACTION BY CRITICISM.

Definition 2 is synonymous with "Internet troll" ... anyone? anyone?

All joking aside, though... and I'm definitely NOT saying that gadfly is annoying. He is not annoying. He is informative, and I happily read all of his posts.

Gadfly might be failing to realize that not all people are aware of the need to distinguish between evolution, genetic traits, and "behavior being passed down through the generations to offspring" a.k.a. "teaching".
e.g.: Brown Hair is not a product of evolution, "it's just genetics."

Gadfly might simply be stating:
If a human gene which produces a euphoric response from smelling smoked foods exists and subsists from the original-accidental mutation in humans today, that same gene's mutation-date cannot be determined by studying the fossil record. Thankfully, no one is expecting anyone to achieve this tremendous feat.

G: "Now, while sugars would indeed have been difficult for early man to obtain ..."
ME: Humans from whom we have descended had, and still have, access to sugars via fruits, sugary vegetables and cane plants - i.e.: berries, tree fruit, beets and carrots.

G: "No, most mutations that carry on do so entirely by accident."
ME: They most-certainly are not intentional. While being obvious truth, this borders on tautology; and I fail to see the correlation to the OP.

G: "Preserved meat is great when you get out of the harsh environments humanity grew up in and to more plentiful lands."
ME: Most likely, humans with the "bacon smells good gene" descended from THESE humans in the more plentiful lands and not the bushmen who stayed in the less plentiful lands who lack the "bacon smells good gene".

Did today's humans "get" ALL of our genes from the humans in the fossil record?

I would consider that genes might exist that predispose humans to certain types of behavior (smoking foods) and that these genes are passed to offspring and thus are a part of genetic mutation and not evolution towards a new species; but of course, the isolated tribal cultures and bushmen wouldn't be passed these genes from across oceans and time.
Predisposition to tastes and sensory stimulus are also results of the aging process.
Getting more granular, different humans within the same family develop different acquired tastes.

Surely and since mutation has happened in isolated geographical areas, all humans cannot be expected to share all genetic traits as other humans. This can be reached through inductive reasoning by comparing skin colors of humans from different societies. The genes from those societies would not spread to offspring without "missionaries."

Sep 26, 2011
WayTooSerious in General Topics