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Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

Could Al Zahrah be the Philadelphia restaurant? It is on that street. They have a little garden/courtyard.

Nov 08, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

We are back and I did find frozen cranberries in Tel Aviv but they were a little too hard to transport and I had to dispose of them. They were leaking all over. We never ended up in those neighborhoods where you mentioned pumpkin but every time I passed any kind of grocery store I went in and checked anyway. As it turned out, we are going to Amman next week where I hope to get it.
Re restaurants: We had very good meals at Adom and Chakra in Jerusalem. My husband had a mussels starter at Adom, our first meal and which set him off on a mussels frenzy after that. The mussels had basil and cream, with a definite flavor that one often does not find in mussel broth. He also started on his hamburger kick. He loved both. I had a salmon carpaccio and a fish on polenta, not exactly like Italy but good. The string beans were a bit salty but overall a very good meal. I also had the cocktail du jour that I liked a lot, with some sort of campari like base.
The next night we went to Lavan because it was close to our hotel and I know it is owned by the same people as Adom. I just had soup and salad (both good) but everything was huge. My husband was still on his hamburger kick after being deprived for months. The last night, a Friday night, we went to Chakra and had to sit at the bar but it was worth it. I was already overstuffed and only ordered one of the special main courses without a starter, grilled mixed seafood and couldn't finish it. I think it could have used a bit more spicing but everything was cooked well. My husband ate mussels again (he's Dutch and missed them badly). The people from Philadelphia who sat next to us were raving about the food as we sat down. They accidentally gave us the cauliflower starter after I had changed my mind during the ordering process and didn't charge us for it. Of course I ate it as it was absolutely fabulous with lemon and olive oil. I couldn't stop.

In Tel Aviv, we ate at Shila's and I ate two of the medium size plates, one of a fish carpaccio with grapefruit and one of seafood risotto. The risotto was good but I think I would have preferred something a bit lighter. My husband is not a fish person unless it's tuna or swordfish so he had a tuna tartar salad. I think he prefers his tartar unmixed into salad. He also had a steak, which again was huge.
We just ate in the neighborhood the next night as we were too tired to make a big deal out of dinner. We ate at Olives, a cafe on Bograshav St. and had a pleasant meal. I had a chicken and bulgur salad. Salads don't mean dietetic as they are huge or have a half a pound of cheese on them. A little bread will be one of those huge foccacia like loaves one can't resist. Luckily we did some hiking but we learned not to order starters.

My husband is the biggest fan of Israel it has lots of Belgian and other good local beer and great hamburgers. He also loves to hike and saw many wadis in the south that enticed him to come back. We filled up a suitcase with Belgian beer we bought in shops around Mahane market. He did not like some of the hummus, calling it slimy and the very spicy sauce on the sandwiches at Miznon or something killed his kishkes. He was not well that night. I had no problems but I didn't really eat the hot sauce or the lamb kebab sandwich he had. I loved their cauliflower, also, and so did Gregory. He wants me to duplicate it.

I think I ate even better than I ate in March thanks to everyone and their suggestions. We hope to go back when we can. I didn't get to try the Yemeni restaurant and I'd go back to Chakra to try other dishes. You are right about certain bagels. I brought some back from the Eilat supermarket and they are like dinner rolls. I had better in Tel Aviv in March. I don't know how people stay thin in Israel except by eating at home. The portions at restaurants are ridiculous. Prices are high when on the dollar but one certainly gets value in that sense. Oh, and we ate at the Jerusalem restaurant since we might end up in East Jerusalem. Feh! That was one my husband picked and he regretted it. Nice surroundings but it was like banquet food. Their signature chicken dish had absolutely no seasoning and though hypothetically stuffed with mushrooms, no discernible mushroom flavor. Gregory had overcooked lamb chops with undercooked zucchini on the side like an airplane meal. We had a better meal at Philadelphia which was almost totally empty. It was homey tasty food at least.

Nov 08, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

I found bagels in the supermarket in Eilat but we never ended up eating them. We froze them and then threw them out. They looked okay. We had bagels in a bagel cafe on Dizengoff (sp) near the mall in Tel Aviv that were good, huge. They had a large selection of cream cheese spreads, too. Is Tel Aviv a different world from Jerusalem?

Oct 23, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

Yes, in Jordan, just for selection I go to several stores. But even in the US I find myself shlepping around for what I want. Someone who lives there is going to take us around and I'll ask him, if we haven't found this before we leave.

This has been informative. I saw a blog where in 2010 someone complained about no bagels and lox in Israel and I've seen it. You can even get bagels in Amman and Phila. cream cheese, along with smoked salmon here in Aqaba. Of course they don't know bagels are Jewish, probably just think they are American.

Oct 23, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

Is Agron the SuperSol you were talking about? I can't believe everyone is still up tonight. I'm going to bed. You guys are an hour later, I think, as we're still on a form of DST. I used to order turkeys through the American Embassy but they weren't free and one year they gave mine away in Armenia. They gave me two smaller ones, which was okay as it turned out. We'll continue this discussion later but I leave for Israel Wed. morning. We walk over the border and rent a car in Eilat. We'll have internet most places and a tablet.

Oct 22, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

I'll look for the Cheaper Kol. I once brought a bag of frozen cranberries in my suitcase to Russia from DC. I refroze them and they were fine.

Oct 22, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

We're looking for this particular cholesterol lowering margarine and other items now I can't remember. Selection is more important than price. You might find it expensive for everyday use but for our one time. Oh, I remember--any kind of American type products for Thanksgiving like canned pumpkin or frozen cranberries. Are those available in Jerusalem? I can get canned cranberry sauce and dried cranberries in Aqaba but I would have to go to Amman for pumpkin and I probably won't be doing that before Thanksgiving.
I might check in Tel Aviv, too.

Oct 22, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

We lived in the Caucasus and Russia so we'll skip Georgian. We've had our fill and I was just in Georgia in February. Also, normally live in DC, which is rife with Ethiopian. Good to know, though, if we end up there. Always good for a change.
What is the best supermarket in Jerusalem now that I know you both are awake and online? We might buy some items to take back with us to Jordan and the supermarket in Eilat we usually stop at is not that great. I notice all the labels are in Hebrew,though, which isn't the case in Jordan most of the time. We will hit Jerusalem for a day or so on our way back south.
This has been an amazing discussion--I do hope we get our assignment there. Part of our trip will be checking out living there but it's a bid on a contract and out of our hands.

Oct 22, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

This must have been what I'd seen. I have Fodor's but I have other guidebooks that are newer and used chowhound so I stopped referring to it. Thank you!

Oct 22, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

Another question about restaurants in Jerusalem, since you know: I did notice that a lot of the restaurants I'm considering do have that Mediterranean menu. Do you know a Kurdish restaurant that isn't too downscale and is open for dinner? I remember reading about one but can't find the information. I guess that would be Middle Eastern but different than the usual that we have been eating. We could slip that in between all that other food. Believe me, fish and beef are a big deal to us in any form so those so called Mediterranean menus look good to us. Or something else kind of different. I think we'll skip Asian in Jerusalem. I've been to Eucalyptus, so-so.

Oct 22, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

I read that people want another day off in the week in Israel besides Shabbot since almost all holidays are religious holidays and they can't get anything done. We get all of Friday and Sat. off here in Jordan and things are open on Fridays or at least a lot of things are. We will be Friday nights in Jerusalem but traveling on Saturdays to Tel Aviv and to Masada so we should be okay.

Oct 20, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

The brewpub sounds like a good idea. I saved an article about beer brewed in Israel. We won't be there over Shabbat but midweek. Kosher is not an issue either. I might have to be the designated driver, however.

this is the link to the article and they also have a picture of the Golan Brew Pub. http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/...

My sister signed me up for a lifetime membership to Hadassah when she doesn't even go to anything herself and I live overseas. The magazine has good travel articles for Israel, however.

Oct 20, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

We went with a huge group in Kabul to a Korean restaurant like that. We were dying for something different. I was planning on going to Chakra but some people HATED Machenyehudah. I thought maybe it was a little too chichi for my hubby. I love that market and thought just going there would be fun enough. This was on Tripadvisor that I saw the negative reviews, by the way. One doesn't always get views of people who think the same about food, though, on that web site. They whine about goofy things and it's hard to get a real picture sometimes.

Oct 20, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

We might drive through Nazareth at some point and I'd seen a NY Times article saying Nazareth had good food. That sounds nice in Akko and might hit the spot. That's all we want. We used to go to someplace like that in Thessaloniki, Greece. More for the atmosphere than the food, which was the same everywhere at least on the water. We are living in a place of such similar restaurants that if one is just a tad better it gets our patronage. My husband is suspicious of guidebook recommendations after some bad experiences we had but chowhound led us to a restaurant in Verona that made him practically swoon. I will tell him this is where I got the recommendations from those who live there (and we might get a project in Israel, cross your fingers). My sister claims no food in Israel is that fabulous but she hasn't been there in a few years. I didn't go to the top of the top in March so I can't make such an evaluation. I thought some of the highly rated ones were not that wonderful, however, like Eucalyptus and Berties. Execution not as good as the description on the menu unfortunately. I had some good wine at the latter, however. I did have great hummus and shawarma, much much better than in Jordan. No comparison and they have many versions from around the region at least for hummus. Can't wait to introduce my husband to it.

Oct 20, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

Yes.

Oct 19, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

We'll keep that in mind. We'll be looking for whatever looks a bit different.
Thanks!

One more thing: what do you recommend in Akko? I have heard mixed things about Uri Buri (sp) and I don't think I want such a production for lunch. My husband would probably want to sit by the water and is not picky after that, though I tend to be more so.

Oct 19, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

I'd seen your posts and hoped you would see this. I had a feeling that was the case with people bringing food. Druze sounds good, though we live in Jordan and eat much the same. I would rather eat simple Druze food than bad complicated food by far. My husband would love that idea. The zimmer boasts that the stonework is by Druze workmen so maybe we will luck out. Salads and kebabs will be fine. Thanks for the tip. I'm printing out the other huge discussion from August or around then to take with me. Those poor people had to travel in ISrael and Jordan in August when it was so hot. I was in Israel in March and the chowhound discussion was a little older. We didn't starve, though!

Oct 19, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Can I make cranberry sauce from dried cranberries?

All these good ideas. I can have cranberry sauce all year!

Thanks, I'll copy this and put it in the file with the other recipes.

Oct 19, 2012
jfk66 in Home Cooking

Three nights at a zimmer in Had Nes, southern Golan, Israel - will we starve at dinner?

In a previous chowhound discussion I saw that someone dismissed this area as a culinary wasteland. We are going up there during our trip to Israel for some hiking. Neither of our three guidebooks mention anything in this area, though perhaps our hosts will. I have no expectations except hearing about a place in Nimrod, which is not that close after a long day of hiking. Does anyone know of anything around there. There are lots of zimmers in the area so one would think there would be restaurants. We don't need anything fancy as we'll be in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem for enough nights to get our fill of whatever we want (with much chowhound advice in hand).

The chowhound who was in the north did not come up this way. Chowhounds gave us great tips for Verona this summer so I'm hoping for more here since some people seem to live in Israel.

Thanks,
Janet

Oct 19, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa

Can I make cranberry sauce from dried cranberries?

That's an idea, too. My Dutch husband doesn't have the tradition of cranberry sauce and I like many variations of it. I'm not even sure besides one other person, who will be around for Thanksgiving here. There are not many Americans here so I can make what I like and just invite local friends or expat friends from other countries to participate. I don't need pectin because I never liked the idea of jellied sauce. The relish sounds good. I think I did something like that one year because it isn't too sweet with orange zest. We have lots of fruit here.

Oct 18, 2012
jfk66 in Home Cooking

Can I make cranberry sauce from dried cranberries?

I just saw this and I live in Jordan where I can get dried cranberries, Ocean Spray jellied sauce and cranberry juice but no fresh cranberries. Once I brought back to Russia frozen cranberries in my suitcase but I won't be going back to the US before Thanksgiving. I will try this. I will look in Israel on our trip there for frozen cranberries as we always stop at the supermarket in Eilat right before we cross to our home in Aqaba. I doubt they will have them. I'm already starting to think about Thanksgiving. Canned pumpkin is available in Amman but they ration it at the store at which it's available. I got two cans since I'd come all the way from Aqaba! I can get fresh pumpkin but it's a pain to make the pumpkin but I have in the past. Such is life in these countries.

Oct 18, 2012
jfk66 in Home Cooking

Restaurants in Verona?

The food definitely has an Austrian bent though not quite like what we had in Austria last year. There was wiener schnitzel but a lot of knodel with parmesan, rather fusion cooking. From one town to the next, the emphasis would vary from Italian to Austrian but almost everyone spoke German. The bread was delicious at breakfast, more like what we had in Austria. Pizza was ubiquitous, however. It was "noodles", not pasta.

Sep 01, 2012
jfk66 in Italy

Restaurants in Verona?

We just came back from our trip to northern Italy and our meals in Verona on both ends were very good. On the basis of recommendations of Chowhounds, we ate at Al Pompiere and Trattoria di via Stella. Al Pompiere was our favorite and the salumeri made my husband, a meat man, swoon. He had the mixed plate, also on a recommendation of a prior review here and ate it all. This is a specialty of the restaurant and many people were eating it, including a large table behind us. I had a room temperature tomato soup with a cherry tomato floating in it, I hope to indicate the fresh nature and goat cheese crostini. My husband had the pork joint with mashed potatoes and I had the cod with lemon peel, also with mashed potatoes. We cleaned our plates. My husband says he is a beer guy (he is from the Netherlands and we also get migraines from red wine) but the soave we drank went down very easily. This was not the usual soave we are used to but a full bodied one that I hope we will be able to find again. It was reasonably priced, too. The meal itself was not cheap but not expensive. We didn't have room for dessert, however. After the trip, we agreed this was the best meal but we were up in South Tyrol where there is not the same kind of food.

Stella was also good but there was a preponderance of polenta. I like polenta and ordered the osso buco special that had polenta as part of it. I picked the marinated branzino as a starter to avoid additional polenta as many of the starters also had polenta with them. As it turned out, even the fish came with polenta and the salumeri, that my husband ordered again, had it. He did enjoy the salumeri, a large one even though the waiter recommended the smaller one. He had the beef over the arugula and loved it but my osso buco was rather dull with overcooked peas. Dessert helped as I had peaches with the amaretto cookies crumbs and my husband had a huge piece of tiramisu. The pasta special was rabbit ragu and perhaps I should have had that but I had had a huge plate of pasta the night before. I would still go there again and try other dishes but Al Pompiere was better. Stella is less expensive. Other people looked happy, though.

Sep 01, 2012
jfk66 in Italy

Restaurants in Verona?

I just saw your post. We will have two nights to eat in Verona, one on either end of a hiking tour in the Dolomites. My husband likes more simple food and I remember from 25 years ago, that I preferred the simpler restaurants in Verona. He does like pizza but is in love with NY style (he's Dutch but went to grad school in NY). I hope to change his mind as the pizza I had in Verona all those years ago transformed me. It had ham and artichokes and that thin crust and I've forever been looking to duplicate that taste again. I hope that if we go after the opera fans leave we won't have so much trouble getting a seat at a restaurant.

Jul 14, 2012
jfk66 in Italy

A Brief Report from Amman, Aqaba, and Petra

I live in Aqaba and of course everyone was disappointed from the above reviews. Floka is a tourist trap and we've given up on Haya Zaman. Our favorite inexpensive restaurant is Chicken Tikka Plus across from Captain's hotel (do NOT go the rival nearby) for good chicken and basic mezze. At the top end we go to the Bourj al Hamam at the Intercontinental Hotel. It's not that expensive and the mezze is the best in town. Ali Baba has some interesting mezze and fish dishes and my husband just said that he had great fish at Blue Bay, though the ambiance is rather glaring. There is also a Moroccan restaurant next to the fast food row (burger king, et al) but the service is slow. The Italian restaurant at the Movenpick in Tala Bay is great but it's a splurge. Someone else had a nice meal at the beach bar at the Kempinski, Although the setting is nice and the mint and lemon drinks are good, I see nothing else to recommend the Yacht Club, which is unfortunate.
In Amman, Fakr al Din is overrated and the food was thrown at us. I've eaten there twice. I prefer Levant, an Armenian food, for the mezze and my sister, a Chowhound guru agrees. In the rainbow Street area, Wild Jordan is the place with a great view and much better food than Books@cafe. No food in Amman is fabulous but there are some good places. The NY Times article was so way off. Reem is nothing special, rather greasy.
Petra is rather a wasteland. I think the new part of the Crowne Plaza is having a barbecue outside the Cave Bar. We ate at the Movenpick, also good salads, not much else. The fancy restaurant was mediocre and the chef was asking for suggestions. We ate in a local restaurant, which was good but it is difficult to find and has no heat! We ate in our coats in January.

Feb 25, 2012
jfk66 in Middle East & Africa