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Best stand mixer for bread dough

I considered getting the Hobart 12 or 20 quart Legacy mixers, but they are not countertop friendly and would not fit in my kitchen. I would have to put it out on the dining room table to use (my desires for a bakers sideboard where such a device could permanently sit have been summarily overruled) and put it away somewhere afterwards. I was hoping that the 8 quart N-30 Ankarsum / Electrolux Assistant would be a more workable solution that I could use in the kitchen and still put away into an under-counter drawer when not in use.

I have to admit that I am also hoping to drink the kool-aid of how the N-30's kneading action is inherently better than the dough hook of the Hobart/Kitchen Aid, but I am pretty skeptical about that at the moment.

All in all, if I ever get an Assistant/N-30, even if I love it to bits, I will keep the N-50 for the attachments, as I think that having to put the N-30 on it's side to use the Assistant attachments is kind of an ass design.

Apr 29, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

Best stand mixer for bread dough

As an FYI, I have a Hobart N-50. While not bread dough, it can get bogged down making buckwheat pasta dough. I have been shopping for an Ankarsum / Electrolux assistant to try, though I don't know if it will be much better.

Apr 27, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

All I want is a good cup of coffee at home. [moved from General Topics]

I've poured hot water from both a Bodum French Press a small saucepan into a Hario V60 and gotten good results. The Buono or a Bonavita both will make it much easier to get good results, but it's not a drop dead necessity.

Apr 27, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

Ice cube guidance. Yup. Really.

Not a physicist, but it could be that there are ice crystals still in the ice tray. When the water is added and put into the freezer, each crystal is a seed that grows into a large crystal. Because there are so many seeds, there are many crystals and the ice has a large number of faults where the crystals abut each other, and the ice cube easily shatters along the faults.

If you bring the tray up to room temperature, all the residual crystals melt, and when the tray is put in to freeze, fewer crystal seeds form and the ice cube is more homogeneous with fewer faults to shatter along.

Apr 26, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

What copper cookware brand do you recommend (Mauviel or Falk)

Hello, Falk's FAQ says that their lining is "Austenitic or 300 series, stainless steel contain a maximum of 0.15% carbon, a minimum of 16% chromium and sufficient nickel and/or manganese to retain an austenitic structure at all temperatures from the cryogenic region to the melting point of the alloy. This type of steel is used most often in food processing equipment."

Unfortunately it does not specify that the stainless that they use is 16% chromium and 0.15% carbon, just that their steel has those minimums and maximums. These percentages allow them to be use any of the 200 or 300 series stainless steels!

Apr 22, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

Does anyone else consider this rude?

That's part of the table service! You wanna da jus?

Apr 21, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

What do you put in your PAELLA?

I do not pre-soak or brine the rabbit before adding it into the paella.

I have generally followed the "mother of all paellas" page by Jose Martinez, though I modify it in that I make a dry sofrito / sofregit out of onion, garlic and the tomatoes before browning the meat, which takes an hour. Anyway, his recipe salts the meat and then includes a 20 minute stewing period, followed by a 25 minute simmering period once the rice is added. The salting/stewing/simmering seems to help draw out some of the rabbit funk out of the meat so it is not that strong. On the other hand a little of the flavour it is now diffuse in the stew water that the bomba rice is cooking in, but can work with the other flavours in the dish. However, if you don't like the "natural" rabbit flavour anywhere in the dish (or if you were in a hurry and were not having the stewing period), then brining the rabbit in salt water (a soak butter milk if you prefer, but I think that salt water works better and is cheaper) before adding into the paella would be a good idea.

From your photo I'd say that my paella has nothing on your paella!

Apr 21, 2013
khuzdul in Home Cooking
1

In Pursuit of Umami

The Chinese equivalent is for umami is xian (which pre-dates umami was first "coined" in 1909, but then it was also described by many cultures including Japan with different for ages!) I don't know of any herb that grants it. Mushrooms, cheese, fish sauces.

There may be a 6th "flavour" for fattiness. IIRC, it is not a traditional taste receptor, but there are proteins that are released into the body triggered by lipids that may affect "appetite" and "taste".

Apr 20, 2013
khuzdul in Home Cooking

What do you put in your PAELLA?

Chicken and rabbit if I can find the rabbit.

Apr 20, 2013
khuzdul in Home Cooking
1

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I don't know about offensive, but cultures where large hunks of meat is not served is pretty much any culture that does not have knives as a regular dining utensil. Without knives as a regular dining utensil, what are they supposed to do with a large hunk of meat at the table?

For example that would include chopstick users, people who eat by picking up small items with a bread... So off the top of my head, a lot of East Asia, South Asia, Horn of Africa, North Africa, native South American and native Central American...

The absence of knives may not be related to chopsticks or eating with bread. For example the Indonesian dinner setting has a fork and spoon; fork in the left hand, spoon in the right and the fork pushes food onto the spoon. In part due to the historical symbolism of the Kris in Indonesia, Indonesian culture developed such that to bring/have/use a knife at the dinner table is rude, so large hunks of meat are not served. Thailand also has a fork and spoon place setting, no knife, so you can pretty much add a lot of South East Asia to the list also!

Apr 20, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food
1

Ice cube guidance. Yup. Really.

Ahh, if you were doing that, then it is more than just a release problem from the tray. Your other thought that the freezer temp is too low is a good one.

If the freezer temp is too low, the water to crystalizes fast. With a freezing but not too cold freezer, a few crystals form and grow into a large unified unit with few faults. If the freezer is too cold, then the water crystalizes faster and many crystals form and grow - the resultant ice cube has many faults and is weaker.

The amount of force you are applying when you twist the tray is too much for the weaker ice cubes. You can either reduce the amount of force needed to extract the ice cubes by running more water over the back of the tray longer then you currently do in order to melt it more, or you can raise the temperature of your freezer...

Apr 20, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

Other than ebay, what is a great place to get 3mm copper cookware?

Duparquet, Huot and Moneuse, Co. sells 3mm saute pans with cast iron handles.

If you are looking for used:

East Coast tinning sometimes has 3mm saute pans with cast iron handles. French Kitchen Antiques. Four and Twenty Blackbirds Kitchen Antiques...

Apr 19, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Depending on what is being served, sometimes I do it both at home and in public. For example, specifically, when served shrimp I will remove the tail shell from all the shrimp and put the shell aside. When I have shellfish, I remove the shellfish meat and stack the shells on the shell discard plate if provided. When I get a hunk of meat with a huge bone, I de-bone my meal. It is more efficient, far less messy, neater and in general less gross to me to do this before eating than to have to pick through the meal for the inedible bits while eating. I was never taught that it was bad manners, nor do I consider it to be so. What is rude about it?

Apr 19, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

Ice cube guidance. Yup. Really.

This works for me as well...

Apr 19, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

Heavy, but not too heavy, cleaver?

I agree with you, you don't want to combine the functions of chopping bones with cutting vegetables. While a Chinese cleaver is the same general shape as the Western meat cleaver, it is a very different animal. The every day cleaver is too thin and fragile to be chopping bones! As Chemicalkinetics mentions,if you want to stick with Asian cleavers to hack at bones then you need to look for bone cleavers specifically.

For large bones, I think that scouring a line on a bone, than wacking it with a mallet to fracture the bone along the scour line generally works much better at home for most people than whaling on it with a cleaver.

Apr 19, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

What copper cookware brand do you recommend (Mauviel or Falk)

What do you find different about the alloy? There are many different sub-types of 18/10 stainless, and they may use one with a slightly difference composition, but I think that it is more likely that they use a different finish for the same stainless steel, just like they have a different finish for their copper.

Apr 19, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware
1

What to freeze homemade broth in?

I second the suggestion of using baby food containers. 2oz, 4oz, 6oz...

Silicone ones are nice, but if you don't like silicone there is BPA free plastic and glass ones also. They usually either stack or come in handy trays as well.

Apr 16, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

When did people start talking like bad food bloggers in real life?

One use of slang is to simply informal conversation, but that is far from the only use of slang. Very often, the use of slang does not actually increase the entropy level of speech above "normal" informal speech. The use of slang can also actually make informal conversation more complex, especially to outsiders. If someone says "Hey man, you're harshing my mellow... bringing me down!", is not simpler and less complex than just saying "You are depressing me."

Just because a word has a formal professional meaning, it does not mean that all uses of the word is formal and professional. Chef has a clear and specific professional meaning, but now it seems that almost nobody in America knows what the heck a Chef should be defined as. So the words themselves, "flavour profile", may be a formal culinary term, but the usage as described is not a formal professional use that allows the users to speak more precisely or convey more information than normal.

To move past the actual words used, or that slang must simply informal speech, other reasons slang may be used include to prove to others one's membership in a social group and/or also to try to establish or prove a persons relative rank within the social group. It does not matter where the words were appropriated from.

Apr 13, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

Water trapped in casserole lid - please help!

The water is getting stuck in there because the hole is smaller than the diameter of a drop of water given the surface tension of water and the amount of pressure generated by gravity upon the water is not enough to force it out. The water probably would not normally enter the hole easily either, just as it does not come out easily. It is getting in probably as steam, when the water is soapy and the surface tension is lower, or when under pressure and forced in as under a faucet.

The wicking idea should work, or you can put it back into a warm oven and get the water out by turning it into vapor.

Apr 13, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

Water trapped in casserole lid - please help!

Is the knob hollow ceramic that is part of the lid? If so, the hole is probably to prevent any pockets of air from exploding during firing the ceramic.

Apr 13, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

When did people start talking like bad food bloggers in real life?

Slang, jargon, vernacular (socio-linguistic), formal / informal speech...

While "flavour profiles" by itself as a phrase is not "slang" according to some rigorous 1970's formal academic definition set fourth by some linguists, the specific use of language by "millenials" as described is well within what many other linguists accept as slang.

Apr 13, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

When did people start talking like bad food bloggers in real life?

Daggum whippersnappers and their slang... No other youth of any other generation has ever hacked vernacular language to suit them to the chagrin of other generations.

Next thing you know, people will be using pictures of cats or nonsensical cartoons with implicit names like "me gusta" our "you don't say" that convey some unspoken meaning, instead of actually typing what they mean, like OMG, :P or (>*<) of the last respectable generation.... "All your base man", it's like, u know, I mean, like, it's the cat's pajamas! LK RLY!

Apr 12, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

My Paella is not the Bomba

I use aborio rice for paella sometimes and it can turn out allright. I think that you are over-cooking the rice with too much liquid in addition to moving it about too much. I only move it enough to spread it out fairly evenly in the broth.

Mar 31, 2013
khuzdul in Home Cooking

For Those Who Like Martinis

Those gosh-darned new fangled old-fashioned cocktails are just bittered slings anywhoo!

And I would have gotten away with it if it wasn't for you meddling kids!

Mar 27, 2013
khuzdul in Spirits
1

Ordering several appetizers instead of a main course

I think that ordering multiple appetizers instead of one large main course is like going back to multi-course meals. There is nothing "wrong" with it, either on the consumer side or the restaurant side. It probably won't really bother the waiter unless one is annoying in other ways (eg one wants to substitute things from every dish, especially key components that the dish can't be made without), but then that person would probably be annoying regardless if they ordered one dish vs many...

Mar 27, 2013
khuzdul in Not About Food

For Those Who Like Martinis

If you want to go back to the roots, you can trace a lot of cocktails back from the 1800s down to a basic recipe of spirit + fortified wine + dash of bitters. eg Manhattan, Marguerite.

That does not make every drink that contains whiskey + fortified wine + dash of bitters (then adds in two times as much volume of other ingredients) something that should be called a Manhattan, nor should every gin + fortified wine + dash of bitters + more something should be called a Marguerite (the Marguerite has been a recipe in print in the same name contemporary to the the earliest claims of any drink linked to the Martini / Martinez in print, so which is a variant of the other or are they simply different cocktails...) A Vesper is often considered a cocktail in it's own right and not "just" a martini variant.

If one decides that just because there is some vestigial resemblance between any two things to call them a "variant", then reductio ad absurdum, you could say that a hyena is a cat variant or a sea lion a dog variant, and pretty soon we will have human sacrifice! Dogs and cats, living together! Mass hysteria!

In the end, what is or is not authentic or properly termed is in the eye of the beholder. If the Slate believes that all those recipies are martinis, then bully for them, but dagnabbit, they ain't going to be putting no slick moves over the old geezers, cause back in the day you could only get a martini if you made the gin yourself in a bathtub, and if it was good enough for Moses, it's good enough for me!

FWIW, I sometimes order an extra dry Martini, and I don't really consider them to be a true martini, rather a quadruple shot of gin served straight up. I'm also OK with people calling their drink XYZ-tini or XYZ Martini after the glass rather than a variation off of the Martini drink, even if in the end I'll judge them when they ask for a double chocolaty red-eye soy chai with an extra-extra shot of espresso martini with syrup on top (but sweetened with stevia/agave nectar instead of sugar please because I'm on a diet), so I'm not especially pedantic about the use of the term "Martini" in the end.

Mar 26, 2013
khuzdul in Spirits

Cooking tajine for 30 people - what cookware?

If you are cooking it a long time in the oven, I think that paulj's covered turkey pan is the best way to go... Personally, while I don't have much use for the turkey pan like that after, $28.00 for a wedding is cheap enough to be a single-use throw away. Can cook, transport (well sealed in saran wrap for keeping everything in and preventing cross contamination, and even then perhaps in a garbage bag to prevent spillage) and re-heat all in the same container.

Another option is to get as large an inexpensive braiser or rondeau that will fit in your oven, but that would be more expensive than paulj's option. On one hand you might have more utility for it afterwards, on the other hand if you have little use for it after the price makes it not as tossable. You can get a 15qt braiser at about 14 to 15 inches in diameter for about $60-$70.

Mar 24, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

For Those Who Like Martinis

While they look tasty, a lot of those skating by on the martini name, but a bit short of the martini substance!

For example:
Champagne Antoine
Ingredients
1 ounce gin
1 ounce dry vermouth
1/8 ounce Pernod
4 ounces dry Champagne
Garnish
lemon twist

Mar 23, 2013
khuzdul in Spirits

Can a Stir Fry Wok double as a Saucier

You can use a wok to reduce sauces if you want, but the poor heat distribution of the thin carbon steel could be a problem. In the end, you don't need sloped sides or rounded edges. I feel that you are overthinking things. Sloped sides or rounded edges may may some things easier, but a regular sauce pot works fine, especially if you already have one vs getting a pot you don't really want or need.

Mar 23, 2013
khuzdul in Cookware

When is a recipe "yours," as opposed to the author you got it from?

I think that a recipe is "yours" when you have mastered it. You know intimately how small variations to cooking method, timing, atmosphere, heat source / cookware used, humidity, etc. changes affect the taste, texture and composition. What ingredients you can add, omit or substitute to achieve the end product you desire.

As for authorship / attribution, a lot of the celebrity chef recipes are the product of cultural appropriation (not the bad kind of cultural appropriation). Most celebrity chef's don't title their recipes "Good Celebrety Chef's Beef Wellington" or the like. Often if the have a story about the recipe, they fully acknowledge it - because if a lot of people like the story, they will like the recipe better and perhaps will believe the recipe to be more "authentic" somehow - eg. they found it in some charming little town at and spoke to the rustic cook who prepared the meal and learned it from them, they heard of some person who made a kick ass something-or-other and finally was able to convince them to share it, etc. If you do the same and include the good story about how you learned to make your dish, you can call it whatever you want, even Shirley.

Cultural appropriation, the bad kind, is to take a recipe that is culturally endemic make a small "personalization" but not actually changing the character of the dish otherwise then claim it is all yours. Like no one in the entire history of spanish rice dishes ever used elk or other "exotic" ingredients, or that simply changing in some strange ingredient(s) that is not available to a culture makes it a "new" claimed dish, like "John Doe's Arroz con XYZ" that is simply arroz con pollo with the chicken substituted with ostrich, cloned veloca-raptor or something crazy.

Mar 17, 2013
khuzdul in Home Cooking