Antilope's Profile

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Stuffed Peppers: do you brown the meat before making yours?

I just saw this recipe for Stuffed Peppers the other day and I have to share it. The recipe by Kraft is from 1931 for Peppers stuffed with Macaroni and Cheese. Here's a link to the recipe booklet showing a color illustration of the dish. A dish from the Depression (glad I didn't have to eat it.):

Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Stuffed Bell Peppers from 1931
http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id...

about 6 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Premade enchiladas for camping

On fishing trips my uncle and I use to take scrambled egg, tomato and chorizo burritos in a flour tortilla with a little hot sauce. This was rolled and wrapped in aluminum foil.

Another good carby one is a potato burrito. Fried potatoes, onions, bell peppers, melted cheese, seasoned with a little chili powder and maybe hot sauce or Heinz Chili sauce in a flour tortilla.

about 6 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

What does your cookbook collection look like?

I'm switching to e-books cookbooks. My tablet can hold hundreds. Best of all you can electronically search them.

about 6 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? August 2014 Edition, Part 2

Bleaching cake flour changes how it absorbs fats and liquids, affecting the crumb of the cake for the better. Bleaching also weakens the flour gluten and lower gluten makes better cakes.

In all types of wheat flour, freshly ground flour has to be aged for a time or it will have poor baking characteristics. Instead of waiting, mills can bleach the white flour, which accelerates the aging process and it can be sent to market sooner. Also, it does whiten the flour.

But some people say they can taste the bleaching chemicals in the baked cake.

According to Wikipedia, these chemicals are used as flour bleaching agents: benzoyl peroxide, Calcium peroxide, Nitrogen dioxide, Chlorine, Chlorine dioxide, Azodicarbonamide, Atmospheric oxygen.

Using chlorine, bromates, and peroxides to bleach flour is banned in the EU. The bleaching of flour is also banned in Australia.

about 8 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? August 2014 Edition, Part 2

I haven't tried this yet, but it appears to be very interesting. It involves making cake flour from unbleached all purpose flour.

For those that are concerned about bleached cake flour and the chemicals used to create it, there appears to be an alternative.

Dry, unbleached all purpose flour is heated to 266-F (130C) in a microwave, cooled to room temperature and mixed 1/8 by weight with cornstarch making a homemade unbleached cake flour with the characteristics of bleached cake flour.

In Europe and Australia bleached flour was banned in 2007. People there missed bleached cake flour.

Someone developed a homemade replacement for bleached cake flour by heating unbleached all purpose flour in a microwave to 266-F (130C) and allowing it to cool to room temperature. It is then mixed 1/8 by weight with cornstarch to lower the gluten content.

Heating dries out the flour and ruptures the surface of the flour starch molecules, changing its characteristics to that more like bleached cake flour. In cooling, the flour re-absorbs its moisture content from the air, but retains good cake baking qualities it obtained from heating in the microwave. Adding the cornstarch lowers the gluten content of the all purpose flour to that more like a cake flour.

This homemade cake flour is called "Kate Flour", named for the person that developed it. Here is a link to the blog of the person that created it and also the recipe for making the homemade cake flour from unbleached all purpose flour:

http://amerrierworld.com/kate-flour/

about 8 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

When is Burger King going to realize that their fries SUCK?

Most fast food today is terrible. I avoid it at all costs.

about 16 hours ago
Antilope in Chains

Dough hook vs. hand kneading

I've used the spiral dough hook for over 3 years without a problem, making several loaves of bread a week. I usually only use 500 grams (a little over 1 lb - 4 1/2 cups) of flour in a batch. The motor shows less strain and heating with the spiral dough hook. The mixer is almost too hot to touch with the "J" hook, so you know what that is doing to the gears. The regular dough hook puts more wear on my mixer than does the spiral hook. Just look at the two dough hooks in action on the videos and this is apparent. I've tested both and this is real world experience. I will take the chance, because it works so much better, I wouldn't go back to the old "J" hook now for anything.

All of the gears in a Kitchenaid, except for one sacrificial plastic gear, are metal. Most Kitchenaid failures are caused by overloading the machine. I only use 1 lb of dry flour (about 4 1/2 cups) per batch and my 5qt Kitchenaid bowl lifter model has lasted for over 5 years. The last 3 with the spiral dough hook. I have an older 4qt Kitchenaid tilt head that is over 20 years old that has never had a repair.

about 17 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Secure those recipes.

I've found that a lot of "old family recipes" came from old newspapers. Here's a link to the Google Newspaper archive. Anyone looking for old recipes should search for the name of the recipe or some of the main ingredients. I've found a couple old family recipes in this archive. Type your search in the lower search field next to the "Search Archive" button, then click "Search Archive":

http://news.google.com/newspapers

The search tends to favor newspaper articles from the early 2000s, but keep clicking on the returned list of links and some go back further ( to the 1990s, 80s, 70s, 60s, etc). There are newspapers back to the 1800's in the archive.

http://books.google.com/bkshp?hl=en&a...

Another source of old recipes from old cookbooks is the Google Book and magazine archive. Search for your old recipe names and main ingredients in this archive also. There are coobook previews and entire books and magazines on this archive:

http://books.google.com/bkshp?hl=en&a...

about 18 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Seeking Bran Muffin Recipe from 1975 edition of Joy of Cooking

Judging from this news article from 1981, it appears the recipe I posted and the one in the article link below go back to the 1931 or 1952 edition of Joy of Cooking. In the link below, read the three paragraphs above the Bran Muffins recipe, starting with "Mark Becker".

Here's the link to the article and recipe:
Eugene Register-Guard - May 5, 1981
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=...

In the same newspaper in 1981, here's an article about the grandchildren of the Joy of Cooking author writing an updated edition of the cookbook.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=...

about 19 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Dough hook vs. hand kneading

I own a Kitchenaid 5-qt bowl lifter model that came with a "J" hook. I found a Kitchenaid Spiral hook that fits it. My mixer now runs cooler and with much less motor strain while using the spiral dough hook. The spiral hook seems to develop the dough faster and with less heating of the dough than the "J" dough hook.

There is a big difference between types of dough hooks when it comes to performance. The "J" hook vs the spiral dough hook. I have used both and I think the spiral hook is superior. Watch the short videos of kneading dough below and decide for yourself.

The spiral dough hook presses the dough into the bottom of the bowl and kneads back and forth through it.
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The "J" hook beats the dough against the side of the bowl and the dough climbs up the hook. There is a disc at the top of the "J" hook that blocks and keeps the dough from climbing out of the bowl.
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These short YouTube videos show how each dough hook handles the dough during kneading.
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Kitchenaid with Spiral Dough Hook
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSi2F...
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-oDT...
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ldpvp...
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Kitchenaid with "J" Dough Hook
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9AZm...
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRPDX...
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9ngi...
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEA4P...
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about 21 hours ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Seeking Bran Muffin Recipe from 1975 edition of Joy of Cooking

****Paraphrased recipe****

(1973 paperback edition, page 581)
https://openlibrary.org/books/OL75901...

Joy Of Cooking Bran Muffins

Makes about 22 - 2-inch muffins

These are rather hefty muffins. They are excellent at picnics when served with cheese.

Preheat oven to 350F.
Have all of the ingredients at 75F.

Combine and stir well:

2 cups all purpose flour or whole-grain flour
1 1/2 cups bran
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 teaspoons soda
(1 or 2 tablespoons grated orange rind) optional

Beat:
2 cups buttermilk
1 beaten egg
1/2 cup molasses
2 to 4 tablespoons melted butter

Combine all of the dry with the liquid ingredients
using a few swift strokes. Before the dry ingredients
are entirely moist, Fold in:

1 cup nut meats or nut meats and raisins combined
(1/2 cup mashed bananas) optional

Bake for about 25 minutes.

1 day ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Best hot dog chili recipe? Similar to Pink's or Tommy's from california?

Beef heart was a common ingredient in hot dog chili from Greek hot dog stands in Michigan.

1 day ago
Antilope in Home Cooking

Need ingredients from discontinued TJ mixed bean salad please!

Trader Joe's Marinated Bean Salad - 15 oz (425g) can

"3 bean medley in a lemon & white
wine vinegar marinade with
garlic, onions, & oregano"

Ingredients:

Red kidney beans, romano beans, chickpeas, water, cane sugar, white wine vinegar, olive oil, salt, concentrated lemon juice, dehydrated onions, dehydrated garlic, spices, citric acid, ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

http://www.fooducate.com/app#page=pro...

Aug 18, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

Craig Claiborne's New York Times Cookbook (1990 edition)

There are a number of different editions of the New York Times Cookbook that you can read online at the OpenLibrary.org. Just sign up for a free account.

New York Times Cookbook various editions 1968 to 1979
https://openlibrary.org/search?q=New+...

Aug 17, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

Lahey's No Knead Bread - Pot Help?

I found a way to get some height from no knead bread. Use an old stainless steel mixing bowl. About a 4-qt or 5-qt size. Oil or grease the inside. Let the no knead dough rise in the bowl and then bake in it without disturbing the dough. The thin walls let the heat through, making a crisp crust without a dutch oven or baking stone. The mixing bowl is acting as a round loaf pan, supporting the slack dough. Since you don't disturb the risen dough and it is supported, it forms a nice, high boule.
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You could add an oven proof lid. Usually some old pan lid will fit the bowl perfectly. Then you have a dutch oven. The lid is also useful for covering the dough while rising to prevent drying out.
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Don't use a good mixing bowl because it will end up with some brown varnish discoloring or even a little rainbow coloring of the metal from the heat. Walmart sells inexpensive stainless mixing bowls.
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Sometimes it sticks a little. I use some kind of cooking spray and usually sticking isn't bad. Running an old butter knife around the edge usually releases the bread. I haven't tried the baking grease formula (the shortening, flour, oil one), it might prevent any sticking.

Aug 17, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? August 2014 Edition, Part 2

Worked okay with a small amount of salt. Didn't hold back the sponge at all. I got the idea from some recipes on The Fresh Loaf. I wasn't using the method for any autolyse, more to get more flavor and tenderize the whole wheat by soaking.

The bread had more flavor than a straight dough.

Aug 17, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

Trader Joe's YAY/MEH/NAY - August 2014

Like 40 clove of garlic chicken, a new dish! The 1000 peppercorn omelet. ;-). Should appeal to chiliheads.

Aug 17, 2014
Antilope in Chains

What are you baking these days? August 2014 Edition, Part 2

I adapted one of my straight dough wheat bread recipes to use the sponge method. Here is the recipe that I used this morning to bake a fragrant loaf of wheat bread.

Molasses Honey Wheat Bread using sponge method

Makes one 2 lb loaf

Time about 10 hours (9 hours total proofing & rising, 1 hour baking, 15 minutes kneading & forming loaf)

Prepare by hand, in a stand mixer or a bread machine dough cycle. Bake in a regular oven.

This loaf will make a wonderful smell while baking because the long period of sponge proofing develops a lot of fragrance. It has a fragrance that the single dough process just doesn't produce, especially from the whole wheat flour.

Sponge:

2 cups (240g) whole wheat flour
1/4 cup (20g) raw wheat germ (I used Bob's Red Mill )
2 Tbsp (15g) vital wheat gluten (optional)
2 Tbsp (15g) malted milk powder (Ovaltine original - don't use chocolate flavored)
2 Tbsp (15g) non-fat dry milk or powdered coffee creamer
2 tsp (5g) diastatic malt flour (optional)
1/2 tsp (3g) table salt
1 1/4 cups (300g) room temperature water
1/4 tsp (1g) instant dry yeast**
2 Tbsp (40g) molasses
1 Tbsp (20g) honey

Remainder of dough:

2 cups (240g) bread flour
1 tsp (6g) table salt
2 tsp (5g) instant dry yeast**
1/4 cup (60g) room temperature water
2 Tbsp (30g) softened butter

Topping:
1/4 cup (20g) rolled oats, quick or regular

Instructions:

In a mixing bowl, stir together the dry sponge ingredients mixing well (except for the yeast).
Mix the sponge water, yeast, molasses and honey together in a cup, mixing well.
Stir the water mixture into the dry ingredients with a fork.
Stir until all the sponge dry ingredients are moistened and there are no dry spots.
Cover the sponge bowl loosely and place on the kitchen counter at room temperature for 8 hours.

In another mixing bowl, stir together the bread flour, 1 tsp table salt and 2 tsp instant dry yeast. Set aside until required.

In a mixing bowl by hand, or using a stand mixer bowl or bread machine mixing pan, add the sponge that has risen for 8 hours.

Add the bread flour mixture to the sponge.

Mix the sponge and bread flour mixture, adding more water as required to form a moist, kneadable dough.

Mix in the softened butter.

Knead the dough by hand 10 to 12 minutes, or knead in a Kitchenaid stand mixer on Speed 2 for 6 to 8 minutes with a dough hook, or run the dough through a bread machine Dough cycle.

Allow kneaded dough to rest 15 minutes.

Form a loaf from the kneaded dough and place in a 9 x 5 inch loaf pan.

Sprinkle rolled oats on top of the dough and press lightly to make the oats stick on the dough.

Allow to loaf rise in a warm place for 30 to 45 minutes until doubled. It should have risen about 1/2 inch above the edge of the loaf pan.

Bake for 45 to 60 minutes in a 350-F (177C) pre-heated oven.

The bread is done the when the crust is a golden brown color and when a digital probe thermometer, inserted into the center of the loaf, reaches 195-F (90.5C).

Or test for doneness by the old fashioned method. The bread is done when the crust is a golden brown and there is a hollow sound when the loaf (out of the pan) is thumped on the bottom.

Allow to cool to room temperature before slicing. If you can't wait, that's okay, but the loaf may be a little gummy until fully cooled.

** This equals 1 packet of Instant Dry Yeast - 2 1/4 tsp. Active Dry Yeast can be substituted.

-----

For those interested, here is the...

Baker's Percentage

Molasses Honey Wheat Bread

Sponge:
50% whole wheat flour
4% Bob's Red Mill raw wheat germ
3% vital wheat gluten (optional)
3% malted milk powder (Ovaltine original)
3% non-fat dry milk or powdered coffee creamer
1% diastatic malt flour (optional)
0.6% table salt
0.2% instant dry yeast
8% molasses
4% honey
62% room temperature water

Remainder of dough:
50% bread flour
1.25% table salt
1% instant dry yeast
12% room temperature water
6% softened butter

Topping:
4% rolled oats, quick or regular

-----

Aug 17, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking
1

Cooking on a hotel steam iron

You can also heat a can of spaghetti, ravioli or chili in the coffee carafe filled with hot water. Brew about half a carafe of hot water. Stand the open or closed can in the hot water until heated through.
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A toasted cheese sandwich made on the iron comes to mind. Hold the steam. Or, steam a flour tortilla on the iron and make quesadillas. ;-).
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Ask the maid for a second iron and make a panini!

Aug 17, 2014
Antilope in Cookware
1

Trader Joe's YAY/MEH/NAY - August 2014

YEA - Joe's Dark Coffee Beans - 13 oz cardboard canister (similar to a Quaker Oats container)
YEA - TJ Keurig Coffee Cups Medium Roast - 7 Keurig cups in box - 2.96 oz
YEA - TJ Specialty Teas - English Breakfast - 48 bags, 3.84 oz (makes great iced tea).

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Chains

What the heck do I do with smoked oysters?!

I would put them in a food donation bin.

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

Julia Child's 100!

That's only a little over 53 in Mars years or a little over 8 in Jupiter years. Of course, on Mercury she would be almost 415. ;-).

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Food Media & News

Great deal on the Vitamix 7500 at QVC...

Do they give an extra discount for making us watch David Venable do another happy dance? ;-).

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Cookware

the end-times are upon us. repent.

I'd rather be a backslider and have a real one. ;-).

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Chains

Which Coffeemaker to buy - Done with Keurig

I've gone retro to get a strong, good cup of coffee.
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We have a French press, drip coffee makers, Keurig coffee makers, an espresso maker etc. We grind our own coffee beans. Lately, the coffee just seemed blah.
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About a month ago, in the back of a kitchen cabinet, I found our old stove top coffee percolator. We haven't used it in about 10 years. I decided to give it a try. Wow, it made a really good tasting cup of coffee.
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We have since purchased an electric percolator and use it more than any other coffee making method. The left over coffee goes in the fridge and makes really good iced coffee. We still grind our own beans.
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Maybe as you get older your taste buds change, but I now prefer percolator coffee over other methods.

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Cookware

When is Burger King going to realize that their fries SUCK?

A few years ago, here in Sacramento, a semi-truck load of Burger King French Fries caught fire and burned on one of our freeways. Nobody was hurt. The local media reported that the truck was full of frozen fries. That's all you need to know about Burger King fries. Frozen and shipped by the truckload from the foodservice factory. Yuk.

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Chains

The Perfect Brownie?

Here's one secret to moist brownies for any recipe, under-bake them. Use a digital probe thermometer and only bake until the center internal temperature reaches 185-F. For a real moist center bake to 180-F. Baking above this temperature just dries out the brownies.

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

Tangzhong Roux FAQ

Glad it worked for you. My family now can tell the difference if I don't use a roux in the bread. They complain about the "rough" bread.

It's really a pretty simple technique. I believe the greatest obstacle to its widespread use is the name. It sounds so alien, like some food on Star Trek. What can you do, that's what it's called.

Too bad it wasn't invented in Australia. It would be called something like Fluffy'roo. ;-).

Aug 16, 2014
Antilope in Home Cooking

Texas Muffin Tin

Amazon carries the Texas, Large, Jumbo muffin tins from several mfgs. Each tin bakes 6 muffins.

Aug 15, 2014
Antilope in Cookware

Trader Joe's YAY/MEH/NAY - August 2014

Spinach Dip. NAY, NAY, NAY, NAY - THE NAY'S HAVE IT.
I'm afraid even extensive doctoring couldn't save it. Into the trash it went. Spinach in a white glop with a slightly weird dill flavor. This tastes so bad/bland I don't see how it got into production. Who would buy it twice? Did I get defective batch? This was just the plain TJ Spinach Dip, not the Spinach and Kale Greek Yogurt Dip. I haven't tried that yet.

Aug 15, 2014
Antilope in Chains
1