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Salting water - A poll - why or why not?

Haha, I definitely don't go quite that far. More like... Hm. I don't think I've ever really measured, though it really depends on how much I'm making. If I'm making a single portion, I tend to toss in what my Italian friend calls a "blah"; it's like a large pinch. I don't think it's enough to make it taste like seawater, which I can see maybe being too much.

I understand being hypersensitive to salt. When I was younger I couldn't eat at many of my friends' places because their parents would salt the food so much. I was actually in Japan with a group of other students in high school and, while everyone thought the udon - I think it was udon, anyway - we were having was awesome, I was nearly throwing up with how salty it was.

Sep 24, 2011
berrybabe in Home Cooking

Salting water - A poll - why or why not?

How much salt did you add? I don't add as much as some people here, but my pasta's never tasted salty. And I grew up in a family that's never used much salt at all! o.O

Sep 20, 2011
berrybabe in Home Cooking

Salting water - A poll - why or why not?

Unsalted, or "sweet", butter's actually better for things like baking, jsyk...

Sep 20, 2011
berrybabe in Home Cooking

Salting water - A poll - why or why not?

+1

Sep 20, 2011
berrybabe in Home Cooking

Do you add salt to boiled water for pasta?

Yes to salt; never, ever, EVER to oil.

Sep 20, 2011
berrybabe in Home Cooking

In praise of the kitchen scale. Do you find it so useful?

This is actually why I pretty much stopped buying American cookbooks (hey, I'm Canadian, and where I live I can easily get European ones--all sorts of Asian ones too, actually, but not always in English, so...).

Sep 20, 2011
berrybabe in Cookware

In praise of the kitchen scale. Do you find it so useful?

Saying that baking--or cooking, for that matter--is not affected by small differences in the amounts of ingredients is a myth, and it can actually scare many people from cooking or baking. I know this because 1) I have had disasters result from new recipes both because a vague description of what it should look like was given as well as because it called for something like a "large" carrot, or three "medium" sized tomatoes, or "a potato about roughly the size of your fist" (yes, that was actually listed in one). or "a handful of blueberries" (that one's real, too); 2) I have friends who don't cook or bake because their first few tries turned out wrong, even though they followed the recipe; and 3) people use different modes of measuring volume, as has already been brought up. Yes, once you have the experience volume can be more comfortable to use, but that can take a LONG time to build. Escpecially when you have no one to actually show you how things should be done for that particular recipe.

As for me, the only thing I consistently measure by volume is pancakes. Why? Because I know what the batter should look like in order to get the result I want--I use Jamie Oliver's one-cup pancakes recipe (except I don't use self-raising flour; I just add some baking powder), and I really pack the flour into the mug I use. I know this because I make them very frequently, and I also know that my sister prefers the pancakes that result from a slightly thinner batter. Sometimes I make dishes where I just throw things together, like a soup or a stir-fry, but that's because I'm not looking to replicate a certain result like I would when making, say, bread or brownies. Even my friend who's part Italian, who doesn't use a recipe to make her pasta dishes, admits that sometimes her sauces don't come out as nice as she would've liked them to, and that it's often because something looked wrong with the sauce but she couldn't figure out what it needed more or less of. I'm not saying that if you know what your product is supposed to look like in the end and you get consistent--the keyword there being "consistent"--results that you should switch to using a scale, but seriously? Most people don't have the kind of experience needed to correct things by sight, smell and taste alone when they're following a recipe they've never made before, and sometimes even those they know well.

But then, I've always been able to pick out if an end result was drier/stickier/etc. than I like, both with my cooking and others'. I guess if you don't have that same sort of tongue you might not notice the differences in texture and flavour that can result, but I would think that pretty much everyone on these boards would, so...

Sep 20, 2011
berrybabe in Cookware

Eating the Placenta: It Tastes Like Squab!

To those saying that Kuru resulted directly from cannibalism, some believe that it might actually have been manganese poisoning(1)... And even if it is truly a result of cannibalism, the brain is considered to be the "most infectious", which a placenta most definitely is not(2).
(1)http://www.ourcivilisation.com/madcow/kuru.htm
(1)http://emedicine.medscape.com/article...

@NicoleFriedman: Animals also have not started the wars we have, the cruelties in human nature, or the harm to Mother Nature that humans have. They also do not subject other species, both plant and animal, to the cruelty that humans have done and some unfortunately continue to do.

All that being said, if I were to decide to eat my own placenta after giving birth, I would be the only one touching it, and I certainly wouldn't be advertising it to all my friends and family. I say "if I were" because I probably won't--heck, I'll probably have entirely forgotten about this article by the time that event rolls around, and it probably won't even occur to me that I could eat it. Eating someone else's placenta, on the other hand, would be just nasty...and it's even nastier that the parents in this article are going to force their kid to eat it...

Sep 17, 2011
berrybabe in Features