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Wearin' of the (sea) green

Having recently acquired a copy of "The Irish Seaweed Kitchen", I want to try out a few of the recipes on St. Paddy's Day. One in particular caught my wife's fancy, "Sea Spaghatti and Cheese Straws" on page 46. Sea spaghetti features in many of the recipes in this cookbook but it seems to be rather hard to find in US based webstores (it is available from Amazon.com (Algaran brand) but the price is preposterous).

Does anyone have experience ordering sea veg from Irish or British webstores, e.g. www.seaweedproducts.ie or www.seaveg.co.uk? If they ship to the US in a timely manner and the cost of shipping is reasonable they look like the best bet.

Feb 23, 2015
teukros in General Topics

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

And to add to that, storing the pan with a slight oily sheen is fine, a puddle of oil in the pan is bad news. After heating, use a paper towel to wipe up any loose oil. Inspect the pan again after a few hours, and the next day too, and mop up any loose oil that you see in the pan with a paper towel.

Between my woks and my cast iron cookware, I go through a lot of paper towels...

Jan 14, 2015
teukros in Cookware
1

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

As with so many things, you learn by doing. Eventually you'll get such a feeling for cast iron that you won't even think about it anymore. Babying it isn't really necessary, just use common sense. Don't scrub it with steel wool, don't soak it in water overnight, careful about the acid (grilling pineapple is really not the nicest thing you can do to it), never put it in a dishwasher, etc. And despite what some bakers will tell you, I would NEVER place my largest skillet on the bottom rack underneath my bread stone, preheat to 525 F for an hour, place the dough on the stone, and then throw a few ice cubes into the blazing hot skillet...

Jan 12, 2015
teukros in Cookware
2

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

If you cook on a gas range, the gas itself leaves residues on the bottoms of, well, everything. I have a few ancient saucepans (stainless steel or aluminum, who knows?) and the bottoms are BLACK. And I scrub them with the green scrubby side of sponges and plenty of hot soapy water. And that black stuff WILL leave a mark if you put it on a nice clean counter. Now cast iron is black to begin with, so you don't notice the natural gas residue. And if you never use soap to clean it (I don't), well just always rest your cast iron on a few paper towels or a newspaper, that's what I do.

When it comes to frying eggs or omelettes, it's really not that difficult. Follow the instructions for preseasoning the pan and then a quick onion, scallion or Chinese chive stir fry, exactly as you would do for a wok; from that point pancakes are actually quite good for it and help to build up the seasoning (btw don't worry about building up the seasoning, just use it). Use it two or three times a week and after two weeks eggs should not be a problem. Just remember, it is CRITICAL to preheat your skillet, and it should be hotter than you would ever make a Teflon pan (ALMOST hot enough to be smoking is a good temp for cast iron)*. And if the skillet is in good condition, you DON'T need to use a lot of oil.

*It actually is possible to fry an egg over fairly low heat, but probably not until the cast iron is fairly well seasoned. It still must be preheated, though.

Jan 10, 2015
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

Coconut oil is close to 90% saturated fat, so there is still a little unsaturated fat which could become rancid. The smell of rancid oil bothers me quite a bit but I gather that some people are super-sensitive.

Dec 22, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

My stove top burners aren't great, but they are gas and they are hot enough for some pretty good stir fries with round bottomed woks, with fairly decent wok hei (for two people). When I preheat my 10 1/2 inch Wagner skillet for a French omelette, I preheat it for five full minutes, until it is crazy hot. The room temperature butter browns instantly. The eggs, left out overnight and also room temperature, cook in about ten seconds... and it is a half hour before the skillet is cool enough to handle without mitts. I have never had any problems with cracking.

Dec 21, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

I started using peanut oil because of Wagner's seasoning instructions. When seasoning or reseasoning my cast iron (or my carbon steel woks) I only use peanut oil. When cooking I use peanut oil primarily, in the cast iron I might use butter for omelettes, or olive oil for this or that. But it is mostly peanut oil. I tried frying with coconut fat and it didn't seem to work very well...

Dec 21, 2013
teukros in Cookware

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

Cooked as before, but for an even 90 minutes at 300 F, and even more loosely wrapped. Smaller pieces of parchment paper. Results were good. A decent amount of cooking liquor in each paper and the carrot halves were flavorful and tender.

This time the string was not blackened. Of course this time the parchment wrapped packets were sitting in a clean and dry pyrex pan...

One odd thing I noticed that I had never observed before was that the carrot halves had a definite SKIN. It wasn't unpleasant but it was just something different. Maybe some people wouldn't like it but I am just so attached to that glorious purple color (or whatever remains of it after cooking).

As before - and this bears repeating - the core of the thickest, uppermost part was the best, creamiest and most tender part.

Only one of these beauties left! I am happy with the cooking technique and I think that for the dressing I will make a kind of an oxymeli with pure Michigan maple syrup, red wine vinegar and either Aleppo pepper or smoked Spanish paprika.

Dec 16, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

Yeah, I don't have much of a sweet tooth. My wife tells me that I am "sour and bitter". I have no idea where she gets that from... ;-)

I'll try to find our camera (and all requisite cables...), so I can provide photos on Saturday.

Dec 11, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

I wanted to try again on Sunday but my wife got very sick. 103.0 F fever etc. Next day I got pretty sick. 102.0 F fever etc. :-(

I'm mostly over it now, still a little weak, but going back to work tomorrow. For lunch I roasted one of my lovely Cosmic Purple carrots.

This time I pulled off the rootlets by hand and cleaned the carrot by gently rubbing with my fingers under running water. I trimmed the tops and cut in half lengthwise as before. I coated with EVOO. Nothing else. Then I wrapped in (unwaxed!) paper and tied with cooking twine. They were neat little bundles but I used more paper with one carrot half than I did with the other, so the steam would have had a harder time escaping with the one than with the other.
I placed them in the (unwashed) Pyrex pan (which was still in the oven, err, I used paper towels to remove excess olive oil left over from Saturday, um) and baked at 300 degrees.
And I thought that I would let them cook for two hours, but after just 30 minutes (if not 20) there were such wonderful smells in the kitchen... and as a result, I cut the time dramatically. Eventually I decided to take one half out after only 60 minutes, the other half after 75.
First, after 60 minutes, I removed the half which had been wrapped with more paper (therefore more steamed, less roasted). I noticed that the twine which was in contact with the Pyrex was nice and carbonized. Yikes. When I removed the paper, there was very little steam. A lot of the purple color of the skin had been lost. There was a small amount of liquor collected in the paper which I poured onto the carrot half (extra flavor). At the table I added a little freshly ground black pepper and a little salt. I used a paring knife with a fork.
The narrow, bottom end was tender and juicy. The upper part was also quite good, the core was a little "al dente". Overall it was a little sweeter, a little less savory, and MUCH more "carroty" than the uncovered carrot which I baked on Saturday.
It took me a lot less than fifteen minutes to finish it... it was good. So I watched the clock... after 75 minutes had passed, I ran into the kitchen, opened the oven door, grabbed the twine with my bare fingers, and cut it open. Even less steam, and less liquor (less steamed, and more roasted). There was something about the smell... this one seemed to be crying out for something special. So at the table I added just a few grains of kosher salt, and a few precious drops each of Iliada Kalamata extra virgin olive oil, and Villa Manodori Aceto Balsamico di Modena balsamic vinegar.
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM.
Less sweet, less carroty. Moist. Texture just about perfect. This time, the core was soft and tender (tender not mushy), while it was the outer layers of the thick, upper part which were a little "al dente". Almost as if, with 300 degrees of dry heat, the core gets cooked first...
I wonder if it would have been even better with an additional fifteen minutes of cooking time. But I still have two of these beauties left, I will cook another one on Saturday (God willing). And I never did try to cut slits into one before cooking it....

Dec 11, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

If you're talking about enamelled cast iron, the enamel does erode with use, becoming less and less nonstick over time, eventually becoming unusable. I recently had to throw out a Le Creuset dutch oven (which I paid almost 300 dollars for). I am still using a saucier but it is only a matter of time before that goes, too.

Dec 11, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

I don't know. My experience is with modern Wagner 1891 (smooth) and modern Lodge (pebbly) pans. Now I prefer Wagner 1891 because of the ergonomic handles. As far as seasoning goes, I'm not sure there is a difference... for a while, one of my best 8" pans was a Lodge. Hated the handle, but the surface, originally pebbly, was glass smooth after I had made Southern style cornbread enough times...

Dec 10, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

Julia almost singlehandedly pulled America out of the casseroles-made-with-mushroom-soup-from-a-can era. I was born in 1966 and my mother (bless her heart) cooked in that style. Thank God for Julia Child.

I like to watch the recent episodes on TV where Jacques and Julia are cooking together. The mutual respect and affection between the two of them are obvious. It is almost like they were a married couple, despite the fact that she was 20 years his senior. And now in "Fast Food My Way" he talks about her sometimes and you can see how much he misses her.

Dec 10, 2013
teukros in Cookware
1

I come to praise the carrot, not to bury it!

Carrots in a cumin honey glaze, a recipe dating from the time of the Roman Empire. I made this a little while ago and it is quite good.

"Another carrot recipe: boil the carrots and chop them into a cumin sauce with a little oil, finish cooking and serve. Make the cumin sauce as for cabbage." --
Apicius 3.21.3

adapted by Sally Grainger in Cooking Apicius: Roman Recipes for Today (p. 95)

Carrots in a cumin honey glaze:

250 g peeled carrots
2 T. olive oil
2 t. cumin (roasted and ground)
2 t. honey
1 T. sweet wine (passum?)
Generous black pepper
1-2 T. fish sauce (I used tokusen yuki shoyu Japanese soy sauce)

cut into spoon size pieces... place in cold water, bring to the boil, immediately drain, pat dry... place oil in ovenproof dish... add carrots... add all other ingredients except fish sauce and toss... bake at 400 F until the vegetables are crisp and the honey has boiled to a sticky syrup. Add the fish sauce to deglaze the sticky honey. Return to the oven for a few minutes to reheat, then serve.

Dec 07, 2013
teukros in General Topics

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

And in the summer, you definitely don't want to be there between 2:00 and 3:00 pm...

Well I did cook one, I didn't peel it (why would anyone peel a carrot?) but I did give it a good scrub with a vegetable brush under running water. The beautiful Burgundy skin is actually thin and delicate, most of it came off, revealing the orange flesh underneath. I am wondering if I should have just gently brushed it with my fingers under running water to keep most of the skin intact...

I cut in half lengthwise and put a large fresh bay leaf and some olive oil under each half (cut side down) in a pyrex roasting pan. I drizzled more olive oil on top and rubbed it around with my fingers. I coated with toasted cumin seeds.

I roasted at 275 F for two hours and then I poked a toothpick into the thick section near the top. It went all the way through with a little resistance. There was evidence in the bottom of the pan that liquid had come out of the carrot and then boiled off. I then increased the temperature to 300 F for thirty minutes. I plated each half with the bay leaf still underneath but off center so that it was visible (nicer presentation). They had reduced somewhat in size (but not much) and seemed to be fairly crusted with the toasted cumin seeds.

I served with a little kosher salt, freshly ground white pepper, and a few drops of good quality Japanese soy sauce. The carrot halves seemed to soak up the soy sauce like a sponge (which is what made me think that maybe I shouldn't have removed the skin) so maybe basting is a good idea. But they didn't seem dry... to me. My wife said that the sides (I guess she meant the outer layers) were a little dry.

The flavor was nice and well balanced. A little sweet (not too much), a little savory, a little spicy.

We attacked them with forks and butter knives. Yes I know. But for some reason, despite once spending 60 dollars on a German carving fork, we never got around to investing in a good set of steak knives... which would definitely have been more appropriate.

I started at the narrow bottom end which I thought would be the most tender. It was actually quite firm... and in the wider parts near the top, the outer layers might have been rather firm as well (hard to tell with those damned butter knives). The core, on the other hand, was soft, delicious, creamy in texture. It is almost as if it cooked from the inside out.

I am wondering if the outer layers, and the narrow bottom part, might have been compressed because of loss of liquid, causing them to become as firm as they were.

My conclusion is that it was quite good and worth doing again (maybe next time with freshly ground black pepper and good quality balsamic vinegar). I just wish I knew what to alter to make the outer layers and narrow bottom end a little more tender...

Dec 07, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

But what difference does it make? Don't slits make it cook more quickly?

Well I was able to leave today before 9:00 AM. It was raining heavily last night and this morning it was wet outside but the sun was out. What a difference it makes to get to the Farmers' Market early. My wife and I usually stagger in there around 2:00 pm and by that time it is choked with tourists and weekend brunchers with hangovers. Most of them are kind of wandering around and gawking. Sometimes they stop to take photographs. And of course, everything is picked over if not completely bought out. But this morning everyone seemed to know exactly where they were going and exactly what they were looking for. More importantly, there was an amazing selection of winter produce. I've never seen such a selection. For example, I brought home a bag of six or eight purple Peruvian potatoes (the ones which are very hard and can be tiny). Now this is my favorite potato and I get these every year but each of the ones I brought home this morning, individually, was larger than any I had seen before today; I picked through all of the smaller ones and took out the largest. It pays to be an early bird.

And the carrots! Burgundy, crimson, orange, yellow, ivory, and all shapes and sizes. I picked out four of the largest burgundy colored carrots (a quick google shows that they may be "cosmic purple" carrots). Although sharply tapered at the bottom, they are 2.5 - 3 inches thick at the top!

I think today I will slice one lengthwise, coat the halves in olive oil, and roast cut side down at 300 degrees, sprinkled with toasted whole cumin seeds. Maybe I'll put bay leaves under them. I guess it'll take at least three hours.

Dec 07, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

Carrot hot dogs? Wow, I'm veggie myself but I never heard of them. Just googled and browsed through a few recipes. I'm no fan of liquid smoke (had it, tried to use it a few times, threw it out) but I do have a lot of Sichuanese related stuff. Now I might have to experiment with different proportions of light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and Baoning vinegar for the marinade... After all, it is only twelve weeks until Spring Training! :-)

Dec 06, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

Thanks, that sounds very reasonable and I think I am now inspired to get up early on a cold rainy Saturday morning and head downtown in search of the largest late season carrots I can find.

I was wondering about roasting at a lower temperature for a longer time. Or would that just dry out not-too-oversized carrots?

Dec 06, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

(very) slow roasted (large) carrots ideas?

I recently read this in a New York Times article about Chef Rene Redzepi, "A Danish Chef Draws Worldwide Acclaim" :

"During the months when the Nordic soil is stingy, Mr. Redzepi doesn’t just trot out the plants that he has had the good sense to pickle, smoke and such in advance. He wonders about the real potential of a potato or carrot.

"That happened last winter, and from it came a dish of what he calls 'vintage carrot,' which is an oversize carrot that spent much longer than usual in the ground and would be inedible raw. By roasting it in thick goat’s butter at a very low temperature for a very long time, he produces something meaty and mesmerizing, tasting partly of carrot, partly of beet, partly of turnip, partly of nothing remotely familiar.

"'You can’t get that flavor from a new carrot,' he observed, adding: 'How is a carrot supposed to taste? Perhaps the taste we’re getting is the original carrot.'"

Now I've never seen a carrot like that. But at the Union Square Farmers Market, we do get some fairly impressive specimens that look like they could be used for stool legs. Maybe 1 1/2" thick, some rare ones closer to two inches thick.

I've always looked at these and wondered... but it seems that the only extant recipes are for the spidery little carrots that are even skinnier than my pinky finger. I'm frankly tired of those pathetic specimens.

Does anyone have any experience slow roasting the large carrots? What temperature, and for how long? Coat them with oil? And/or salt? Any tips?

Dec 05, 2013
teukros in Home Cooking

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

I never use soap on my cast iron, would never scrub with anything other than paper towels, and I'm pretty relaxed about cleaning immediately after use. Maybe the oil remaining in contact with the cast iron does good things to it. I dunno. I will clean before use of course: heat just enough to loosen the oil, clean with paper towels as needed, swirl boiling water around inside the pan, dry with paper towels (and dry completely over a low flame if not using immediately). That's usually all I need to do. The surface should end up smooth and dry, suitable for either storing or for immediate use.

The vast majority of my cast iron is dedicated to vegetarian cooking, my wife does use an 8" wagner 1891 skillet as well as a recently acquired wagner 1891 chicken fryer which was an absolute steal on Ebay (about 30 dollars and it arrived well seasoned and in good condition). But for all of the other pieces it is either peanut oil or butter. Mostly peanut oil. If I am making cornbread for both of us, I use peanut oil - maybe 3 T. total for my 8" skillet, and I have never had any problems.

I was therefore a little surprised when I was making some duck fat cornbread for my wife, in her skillet (which still has a little ways to go after being recently stripped and reseasoned but she can fry eggs and potatoes it it with no problem), using about 5 T. of duck fat, and the darn duck fat cornbread stuck in the pan.... that was the first and ONLY time I have ever had cornbread stick in a cast iron pan!!!

Oct 13, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

I was subscribed to Cook's Illustrated Magazine for two years, and I watch their program nearly every week, but I still take them with a very large grain of salt. To me, they are kind of like Star Trek's Mirror Universe: pretty familiar, but kind of... wrong.

I would never waste time, money, flax seed oil, and natural gas to heat up my apartment with some sort of a regimen to create layers of seasoning on my cast iron pans. I tried something similar with my first two woks and IT DIDN'T WORK (OK they're carbon steel and not cast iron but a lot of the principles are the same. When I finally figured out that the principles are the same, I started to have success with my woks).

I started with a Wagner 1891 set in the 1990s, and maybe it is not collectible, but it came with seasoning instructions which I have used for all of my cast iron (12 pieces and counting) to the present day: Scour thouroughly. Coat inside and out, top and bottom with a thin layer of peanut oil. Place in a preheated 300 degree Fahrenheit oven for one hour. Wipe out excess oil. Ready for USE.

USE it. Cook with it! Make pancakes! Fried eggs! Omelettes! Corn bread! Fried zucchini. Tortillas. Chiles rellenos. Pies. Irish quickbread. Saganaki, if you dare (but only if you have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen and I am speaking from experience). Saute with it! Braise with it! Deep fry with it! USE IT!

And it will be perfect.

Sep 04, 2013
teukros in Cookware
1

Nixtamalized stone ground corn meal... does it exist?

Can anyone suggest a source for stone ground, course grind cornmeal suitable for polenta or corn bread which is nixtamalized?

Thanks!

Aug 29, 2013
teukros in General Topics

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

well... maybe not. It's non organic iron.

The good news is that with a well seasoned cast iron pan the amount of non organic iron that gets into your food is negligible. But after initial seasoning of new CI kitchenware you might want to double up on the iron rich foods like chicken livers, oysters, beef liver, egg yolks, soybeans, tofu, lentils, beans, chickpeas, dried fruits, dark green leafy vegetables etc. just to be on the safe side. A word of warning though: for people who suffer with Crohn's Disease or IBS, non organic iron can exacerbate their conditions.

Aug 29, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

Yes, that is a collector's piece.

EDIT: Holy Cow, over on EBay someone is selling a never opened Wagner chicken fryer with glass lid for 495 dollars! :-O

I wonder if anybody is going to buy it...

Aug 29, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

There were at least three Apiciuses, maybe soon there will be a fourth to endorse the machine.

Sous vide, hmm, that's pretty Iron Chefish. I'd bet that Apicius (etc.) would have enjoyed The Iron Chef...

Aug 28, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

Your friend makes tortillas in oil?

I never use salt (or detergent) and I never use anything other than paper towels. Just heating and wiping with the paper towel is often enough, if a little oil is left behind, I let it be. But if there is still a lot of food stuck to the pan I put a sturdy oven mitt on my non dominant hand, heat the pan JUST to the smoking point and then put it under the (hot) water tap, swirling the boiling water around and then dumping it out. I will then attack with a wad of two paper towels.... there might be some paper particles left in the pan, no biggie, just rinse with cold water, chances are the pan will still be warm enough to dry out after a minute or so. I will repeat the smoking and rinsing procedure a second time if really necessary. The pan will appear black, smooth and dry. I never coat with oil after use.

I'm not a big fan of sugar, but recently I had a Roman feast and I used one of Apicius's dessert recipes for squares of polenta (made with semolina farina and goat's milk) fried in olive oil and honey. The dessert was sublime and the pan was not bothered (even though I burned the honey shhh don't tell my guests).

One Big Important thing is this: Do not neglect the bottom of the pan!!! Try not to scrape it against metal, but it does happen of course. After use, after wiping your pan the first time, still holding onto an oily paper towel, turn your pan over.... see any reddish scrapes or scratches? Rub the oily paper towel into them!!!

Another random tip: if you have a cast iron dutch oven, rice pilaf is a really nice thing to cook in it. Be liberal with the butter.

Aug 28, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

I figured out the cornbread trick with an 8" Lodge. I remember the "pebbly" surface very well (I was shocked). Eventually though, the surface was glass smooth and completely non stick...

I don't know about the bacon etc... either. The overwhelming weight of my experience is with lacto-ovo-vegetarian cooking. It's what I'm used to and my wife's problems with her chops etc. puzzled me. So we're trying to reclaim her skillet... and I'm sticking to what I know.

And just speaking generally, I wonder whether some people are having trouble with cast iron because their experiences with Teflon have trained them to cook at low heat... the cast iron pan DOES need to be hot enough...

Aug 27, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

Watch Julia Child demonstrate how nonstick "nonstick" really is....

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video?id=81...

(from 1:55 to 3:00)

Aug 27, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

I love it by itself with butter. I generally chop up a few jalapenos. But I certainly agree that having it with chili or a salad would make a wonderful meal.

This is the recipe I use:

Southern Cornbread
(For 8” cast iron skillet)

Ingredients:
1 cup stone ground cornmeal
2 Tbsp. flour
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 beaten egg
1 ¼ cup buttermilk (approximate)
3 Tbsp. peanut oil

1. Preheat oven to 425º F.
2. Start to heat a well-seasoned 8" cast iron skillet over a low flame, adding one Tbsp. of oil and rotating the pan so that it coats the sides.
3. Mix the dry ingredients with a wisk, then add the egg and the buttermilk, adding a little more (or less) buttermilk as necessary to achieve a thin consistency (like pancake batter). Add the rest of the oil to the mixture.
4. When the oven finishes pre-heating, increase the flame under the skillet to high until the oil is shimmering, then pour the mixture directly into the hot skillet. Place the skillet in the oven for 30 minutes or so (depending on your oven) until the cornbread is a light golden-brown (perform the knife test before taking it out).

Variations:
1. Add one to three coarsely chopped jalapenos to the mix. Veins, seeds and all!
2. Or, add a tsp. of pepper flakes to the mix.
3. A dash of smoked Spanish paprika or Aleppo flakes added to 1. or 2. can also be good.

Aug 27, 2013
teukros in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY?

Hi Sirrith,

I guess we have different approaches. I'm vegetarian so I never used bacon or sausage in my cast iron, and it all turned out great. I started out with the classic three piece Wagner 1891 set, bought new and completely unseasoned (yes I am an old fart). I remember years ago when I was still getting used to cast iron, just gazing in wonder at the single egg in my 10 1/2 inch Wagner skillet gliding frictionlessly on the tiniest drop of peanut oil. It was a revelation.

Fast forwarding, I got married and I devoted a used (bought on EBay, probably) 8" Wagner skillet to my flexitarian wife's carnal pleasures. I cleaned it as completely as I could and seasoned it for her and she never had any good experiences cooking bacon, sausages, or chops in it. Everything stuck to the iron and the sticky gloppy grease was a nightmare to clean out. I recently (lightly) cleaned and reseasoned it for her, and immediately chopped up an onion and "stir fried" it to remove any metallic taste (just like you would do with a newly seasoned wok). Then I (re)presented it to her but this time I insisted that she only use it for fried eggs for breakfast until the seasoning was really built up (in the meantime she makes do with a Le Creuset saucier). That was only a month or two ago actually... since then she has fried eggs in it with no problem, veggie(!) bacon from Chinatown twice, and once she fried some potatoes in a little bit of duck fat. It is looking better and better. Sometime in the next few days (maybe in the Labor Day weekend coming up), I have GOT to make her some duck fat cornbread...

Aug 27, 2013
teukros in Cookware