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Wawsanham's Profile

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What exactly is Native American cuisine?

About half a year ago I ate at the Museum of Native American History in Washington DC at a restaurant dedicated to Native American foods (from all over North America). Yes, there were lots of corn-based dishes as well as squash, salmon, etc... But, it was clearly very influenced by contact with Europeans as wheat-based products (fry bread), pork and beef, pancakes (wheat), etc... were very much part of this cuisine.

Mar 18, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about blood sausage.

I don't see why pear wouldn't work. The cheeses though might make the whole thing too busy...

Mar 08, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about Head Cheese.

Yes! It makes me think of eating lunch with my grandparents in Germany in the winter: gelatin-held headcheese with "Remouladensauce" (like tartar sauce) with kale and fried potatoes and onions. It's the best way to eat kale!

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about blood sausage.

Yes, I don't like it so much as a cold cut either. I can take or leave it with the mashed potatoes--in Chile the tradition is a grilled blood sausage with mashed potatoes.

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Mediterranean vs Caribbean vs Continental Cuisine, what's the difference?

OK. Despite every Mediterranean country having its own cooking and style, they do share a certain something that is missing in the cooking native to the "North of the Alps in Europe" (so-called Continental I'd say). Someone mentioned olives, also more goat or sheep cheese, perhaps a bit more fish of certain varieties, certainly no hering, also less sourly marinated type foods (pickles, sauerkraut, etc...). Mediterranean foods seem to generally employ more cooked tomatoes--perhaps the tomato has been there longer than in Northern Europe--where tomatoes tend to be eaten raw traditionally--maybe the fried tomatoes of the British are the exception. Eggplant and zucchini dishes are present. The bread in the Mediterranean seems a bit different than "Continental" as it seems mostly wheat-based by traditional as opposed to Central Euro rye-based.
As for Caribbean, I'm not so completely sure you can generalize about it. English-speaking islands' dishes seem quite different from Spanish-speaking islands'; the French and Dutch ones I don't know about. The jerk chicken and calaloo dishes are good examples of English-speaking; I'd say the Spanish islands go for a more "stodgy" (can't think of a better word at the moment) style.

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about blood sausage.

I like to make a blood sausage hash mixed with fried onions and apples, as well as some grain groats (wheat or other) kind of like German "Grützwurst" or Polish "Kaszanka" then.
It is very common in many places (Europe, Latin America, etc...), just that everyone thinks its "theirs" and that no one else eats anything like it. In Chile, where it is known as "prieta", my way of making it is seen as generally bizarre, since here in Chile it is usually a grilled sausage.

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Pollo & gallina?

In Chile, the meat would always be called "pollo" (chicken in English). The animal running around alive would be "un pollo" (a chicken). The female: gallina (hen), the male: gallo (rooster, cock). The same as English really.
Calling some meat on a plate "gallina" would be the same as calling a plate of chicken "a hen"--it would probably cause some laughing. Some other countries might do things differently, though.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Bettrave, ever heard of it? Described to me as a "weed" and used for seasoning

Sounds incredibly like the Chilean Spanish word for beet: Betarraga (regular Spanish is...I forget).

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Whatever happened to Mon Cheri hazelnut chocolates?

I only knew the chocolate-covered cherry liqueur version.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

How long will you stand in line for food?

If given a choice (since line standing might have to be tolerated due to no options), only a couple minutes tops.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Do you use your stove for storage ?

Until about three months ago I kept pots and pans in the oven. They'd be removed and put on the stove when using the oven--this all due to having a small kitchen. Then, three months ago, I got the washing machine moved into a bathroom hooking it up there where a tub was taken out (now it's a "laundry room" with a toilet-sink-washing machine combo). The washing machine space was replaced with a cupboard, and voilá I have an oven that's just an oven.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

I eat it my way

Yes, I forgot about those names. Being half-German and living in Chile, I am used to the names "Alsterwasser" or "Radler" or "Fan-schop".

Feb 08, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

When did noodles become pasta?

I also grew up saying things lie "spaghetti noodles", "lasagna noodles", etc... I don't ever remember anyone reacting strangely to it until 1991 when I was a waiter and I was ordered to say "pasta" not "noodles". Honestly, when people are rude that way, you (I at least) start to question things--internally at least. Yes, that lady was pretty rude. Suggest she keep her opinions to herself.

Feb 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

I eat it my way

I like mixing beer with coke, fanta, 7-Up--i.e. soda, though I drink it without mixing it, too.
I also usually eat pizza with a knife and fork--although it's normal where I live.
I tend to like egg dishes (scrambled eggs, omelettes, etc...) for dinner not for breakfast. This, too, would only get looks depending where you go as it's common in some places (such as Germany) to see those as dinner foods.

How do you like your tacos...crunchy or soft?

Yes, the Spanish will depend a bit on what country it comes frmo. In most of the hispanophone world saying "tortilla" will basically get you an omlette. Not to mention the Mexican use of "torta" for sandwich is quite different from everywhere else where that word means cake/tort.

Feb 04, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Foods Without Enemies

I agree that as Perilagu Khan posted, in the US chocolate chip cookies, cheesecake, lasagna, pizza, and French fries are without enemies. However, my mom was a, maybe bizarre, statistical outlier in that she really didn't like (even hated) pizza, all noodles/pastas including Lasagna, and chocolate! So...
In Chile, everyone seems to love: manjar (milk caramel or dulce de leche), mashed potatoes, French fries, rice, white bread, and Bilz soda. I believe, Chile has the highest per capita bread consumption in the world.

Jan 14, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Salty Cuisines: Your thought?

Well, I don't know if Chilean cuisine is particularly salty per se, but Chileans do put tons of salt on their food at the table,and a lot is added during cooking--as salt is the main seasoning. A doctor told me that the average Chilean consumes over 12 times the recommended daily intake of salt/sodium (recommended by the WHO), and hypertension is through the roof.
I don't know if this is indicative of Latin America in general, though. Although, I suspect it may be from what I've experienced in Argentina and Brazil.

Jan 14, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Fried apples?

It's a variation on cooking apples--quite common in some parts. For instance, apples fried together with blood sausage and onions is great, as is apples and liver fried together.

Dec 29, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Anyone else sick of people using the term "proteins"?

However, I don't imagine most restaurants have that many options. Probably they have 3-5. It's not that hard to say: beef, chicken, pork or tofu. It takes about all of 4 seconds to say. Or, are they in such a huge rush that 4 seconds is to much to say a few words?

Dec 29, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Guacamole variations

I learned to make noodles in avocado from an Italian friend. Just chop up the avocado and throw on the still hot noodles after straining off water; the avocado pieces sort of melt and coat the noodles. Then add some lemon juice and salt.

Dec 29, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Anyone else sick of people using the term "proteins"?

Yes, to call a protein-high food a "protein" in a culinary context would be off-puting and unappetizing to me. It's fine to call protein protein in other contexts: nutrition, genetics, chemistry, biology, etc...--in fact super 100% great, but not in a restaurant. Perhaps food should then just be called "edibles" and eating "alimentary intake."

Dec 29, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Why I hate Christmas

You made someone very happy! Talk about Christmas spirit :)

Dec 23, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Our loves we will not admit

I admit I like cheetohs and doritos... that is true junk food and has no redeeming nutritional qualities: about as bad as it gets. I just try not to eat them too much.

As for iceberg lettuce, thousand island dressing, mayonnaise, jello--well, for some reason those foods are just so put down and "spat upon" in the US or English-speaking world. Come to Latin America, where most people love them unironically, and they're not just served at "retro parties." They're appreciated for what they are; they have their places in the culinary landscape. Actually what passes as Thousand Island here is called "Salsa Golf" and is just ketchup and mayo mixed (no problems with ketchup here either). It is a very common and typical dip at all kinds of social gatherings. I also like things like Manchego and figs, but that mix might actually get the strange looks here, not the salsa golf.

Dec 23, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

National Fruitcake Day

A well-made fruitcake is really nice. I might not want to eat it everyday, but it definitely has it's place--Especially in the chocolate-obsessed USA, some balance please!
I am eating my pieces of "Pan de Pascua" as they call fruitcake here in Chile every day these days. Chile is also a country that celebrates its fruitcake tradition and does not disparage it.

Dec 23, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Why I hate Christmas

First, I don't hate Christmas. I just have difficulties getting into the spirit. Why?
I live on Chile, and it is the hight of summer, hot long days. Beach weather, etc... I grew up in California on the coast without snow or sleet, but at least it was the cooler part of the year; you wear a jacket, maybe a scarf, and it gets dark before 5pm--so it was sort of wintery.
In Chile, most of the symbolism and style seems to have been lifted from the Northern Hemisphere and the spirit is highly commercialized: Santa's village at the mall, reindeer figures, snow symbols, and toys toys toys. At least there is fruitcake and cola de mono drink--two traditional things. People eat turkey (sort of US inspired) or grill meats/barbeque--which is done the same on most every other holidays. I love it here, but this holiday is hohum for me here.

Dec 23, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Favorite Christmas Food Traditions

Not at all. German, with some other Central European roots. hering is very popular there. I think the fish thing goes back to Catholic tradition of not eating meat on Christmas Eve. Traditionally in Poland the dishes are also fish on Christmas Eve. Carp is a traditional fish for that celebration, too.

Dec 18, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

German food - undeserved bad reputation

I haven't heard that it was being slammed. People I know tend to really like it even though I realize it doesn't seem to be a favorite of foodies or food pop culture.

Dec 12, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Favorite Christmas Food Traditions

Potato pancakes, hering salad, fruit cake, stollen, perhaps some other fish...

Dec 11, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Why Does Ketchup on a Hot Dog Piss People Off?

Come to Chile, or other parts of South America. Mayo on a hot dog is the most normal and traditional thing. Lots of it.

Nov 06, 2014
Wawsanham in Features
1

Why do chinese restaurants insist on having "secret" Chinese menus their English-Speaking customers can't decipher?

I'd say Americans like their food moderately spicy (in general) certainly compared to various parts of the world--Latin America, Europe, Americans are a bit spicier in taste preferences. I can't speak about Asia though. All in all, Americans are probably somewhere in the middle on the scale considering the world. They're certainly not the squeamish anti-spice people they're made out to be.

Oct 01, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics