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Wawsanham's Profile

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Would you travel out of the U.S. for a great steak?

But, steak often is a local specialty in other countries (Argentina and Brazil come to mind). I know that steak is iconic in North America (US and Canada), but it also iconic in other places.

Aug 23, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

California rolls definitely are authentic to Chilean sushi as they are always prominantly on the menu and expected. The same for lots of cream cheese.

Aug 23, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Please explain this green bean casserole thing

I think any dish based on canned ingredients could be quite uninspiring. I don't see the problem with green casserole per se. If the green beans are fresh, why not? A lot of casserole dishes are good in my opinion. For instance, green beans stewed on the stove for a long time are great; I guess it's only one more step to casserole from there.

PS I didn't grow up with green bean casserole, and I'm not even sure I've ever had it--at least it didn't leave an impression.

Watermelon Controversy! - Seeded vs. Seedless?

I just tried my first seedless watermelon last year (August 2014). I live in Chile, and it's all with seeds and oblong here.
With seeds, based on the ONE seedless I tried, has a stronger taste.

Jun 26, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Have you ordered spicy hot food and then complained about it being too hot?

Yeah, you might be on to something there.

May 25, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Have you ordered spicy hot food and then complained about it being too hot?

Yes, I think you're right. I'd say--and this is a bit subjective--that only Mexican, and to a lesser extant, Peruvian, could be deemed as tending to spicy. The other countries may have a spicy dish or two (by US standards) but overall go from "tasty" to downright "tasteless". I say this due to reiterated experience comparing a lot of food you get in the US at run-of-the-mil eateries, which tend to be a riot of competing flavors (all the sauces, cheeses, somewhat spiciness, heaviness, etc...) to food you'd get in pretty average places in Chile, Brazil, Argentina, Costa Rica, etc... that would tend toward simplicity of flavors and mildness--at least by US standards. As a further anecdote, Mexican food served in parts of South America makes US-Mexican food seem like the stuff of fire-breathing dragons. True Americans tend to see themselves as being into bland foods (the White ones at least), but I guess it's all subjective; someone must being eating that spicy food at Taco Bell and other Mexican-style chains.

May 25, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Have you ordered spicy hot food and then complained about it being too hot?

Actually, that's pretty hot. Maybe not as hot as Thai hot, but hotter than Latin American or European hot.

May 22, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

How about fruit compote?

Well, to each their own. It has to taste good to you. I, personally, prefer it less sweet--even with just about a teaspoon of sugar to a liter of fruit and water, at the end I might add a little honey. I'm also finding out that my simple concept of compote should be called "kompot" as I grew up with it as a kind of drink of just the stewed fruits and the liquid, not so much sugar and other extras that turn it into a more elaborate dish.

May 15, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

How about fruit compote?

Yes, I know the kisiel also. My grandmother, who was German, called it "Grütze" but it was exactly that: stewed fruit with cornstarch for thickening--delicious! I'd say a kind of natural/non-artificial "Jello"--I almost hate to use that word, though.

May 15, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

How about fruit compote?

Yes, I do tend to think of compote as "Kompot"--my mom was from Germany, grandparents there, and also roots in Poland.
I've generally known it as a drink based on stewed fruits, with some sugar added. Basically, a "juice" with some plums (or other fruit) floating around in it.
It's nice to see that other people have more elaborate ideas for it: more like desserts, with spices, etc...
It's just another one of those dishes that seems to mean something different to different people--like so many dishes discussed at this site.

May 13, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

How about fruit compote?

How do you feel about this drink (with chunks of stewed fruit)? Do you drink it? Do you make it? Did you grow up with it? I find it's a great alternative to store bought drinks and juices: you control how sweet to make it, and it's a great way to use up "old and ugly" fruit--especially apples, plums, and quinces.
I also grew up with my grandmother making it with whole cherries, and it was considered to be kind of "dessert soup" eaten/drunk hot.

May 12, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

What type(s) of cuisine are you just not interested in cooking?

But Scandinavian food has a lot of overlap with German and Polish food: tendency to pickle, herring, meatballs, etc...

May 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

bologna..?

No, I don't remember eating bologna in Italy though I may have and it just didn't register. The thing is that I am just used to the word "mortadela" being used for all kinds of bologna products with or without olive, pepper, pimiento, or other pieces within it.
I also don't see why a product should have one name from a supermarket and one from a deli? What if we gave apples one name from a supermarket and a different name from a farmer's market--who knows it may still happen.

Apr 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

bologna..?

I like bologna (baloney?) from time to time; I wouldn't eat it all the time due to its not being overly healthy, though.
As for this dichotomy between bologna and mortadella: they're the same to me---sure, it may depend on the brand and country as far as the quality of a particular bologna is concerned.
If you go to Germany or Latin America, bologna IS mortadella in those languages (German and Spanish, I believe it's the same for some other languages, too) and can be found all over the place there. It just seems that they're creating this line now between bologna and mortadella in the US.

Apr 27, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Beef Fricadelle?

My mom, being from Hamburg, Germany, made them all the time. So, for me it's just a "fancy" (in the USA) way to say "hamburger." Of course, the bread/bun is in the mix instead of on top and on the bottom, + egg + onion + other stuff/spices in the mix. It sounds like that restaurant is just trying to figure out a way to exoticize something quite regular (ie the new name as opposed to meatloaf, hamburger, or meatballs). Then, of course, a higher price tag can be added.
In the end there will be arguments on sites like this about how to translate frikadelle, is it translatable? Etc, etc...

Gendering of Food

I hear you. The gendering of food or anything is clearly a social/cultural issue--which automatically means that "everyone" does it (well, everyone in a sort of generic sense including men, women, etc...).

Apr 16, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Spaghetti with ketchup - does anyone else eat this?

I've run into ketchup on spaghetti all over: Poland, Chile, Germany, etc... Generally places not associated with spaghetti. They seem to eat it without shame or second thought.
In Chile at the moment, Telepizza (a big international pizza chain--from Spain) is touting it's "BBQ style pizza" with ketchup. It's said in the ad.

Apr 08, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Pomelo?

I thought a pomelo was a grapefruit... What's the difference?

Apr 08, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Gendering of Food

Another gender stereotyped thing, but strictly US is that"women like/crave/love chocolate". This seems to be very culturally specific to the US--which shows that these stereotypes vary between cultures and countries.
By the way, my mom and grandma really didn't like chocolate, and, me (a man), I did. Go figure.

Apr 08, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

What exactly is Native American cuisine?

About half a year ago I ate at the Museum of Native American History in Washington DC at a restaurant dedicated to Native American foods (from all over North America). Yes, there were lots of corn-based dishes as well as squash, salmon, etc... But, it was clearly very influenced by contact with Europeans as wheat-based products (fry bread), pork and beef, pancakes (wheat), etc... were very much part of this cuisine.

Mar 18, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about blood sausage.

I don't see why pear wouldn't work. The cheeses though might make the whole thing too busy...

Mar 08, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about Head Cheese.

Yes! It makes me think of eating lunch with my grandparents in Germany in the winter: gelatin-held headcheese with "Remouladensauce" (like tartar sauce) with kale and fried potatoes and onions. It's the best way to eat kale!

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about blood sausage.

Yes, I don't like it so much as a cold cut either. I can take or leave it with the mashed potatoes--in Chile the tradition is a grilled blood sausage with mashed potatoes.

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Mediterranean vs Caribbean vs Continental Cuisine, what's the difference?

OK. Despite every Mediterranean country having its own cooking and style, they do share a certain something that is missing in the cooking native to the "North of the Alps in Europe" (so-called Continental I'd say). Someone mentioned olives, also more goat or sheep cheese, perhaps a bit more fish of certain varieties, certainly no hering, also less sourly marinated type foods (pickles, sauerkraut, etc...). Mediterranean foods seem to generally employ more cooked tomatoes--perhaps the tomato has been there longer than in Northern Europe--where tomatoes tend to be eaten raw traditionally--maybe the fried tomatoes of the British are the exception. Eggplant and zucchini dishes are present. The bread in the Mediterranean seems a bit different than "Continental" as it seems mostly wheat-based by traditional as opposed to Central Euro rye-based.
As for Caribbean, I'm not so completely sure you can generalize about it. English-speaking islands' dishes seem quite different from Spanish-speaking islands'; the French and Dutch ones I don't know about. The jerk chicken and calaloo dishes are good examples of English-speaking; I'd say the Spanish islands go for a more "stodgy" (can't think of a better word at the moment) style.

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Let's talk about blood sausage.

I like to make a blood sausage hash mixed with fried onions and apples, as well as some grain groats (wheat or other) kind of like German "Grützwurst" or Polish "Kaszanka" then.
It is very common in many places (Europe, Latin America, etc...), just that everyone thinks its "theirs" and that no one else eats anything like it. In Chile, where it is known as "prieta", my way of making it is seen as generally bizarre, since here in Chile it is usually a grilled sausage.

Mar 05, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Pollo & gallina?

In Chile, the meat would always be called "pollo" (chicken in English). The animal running around alive would be "un pollo" (a chicken). The female: gallina (hen), the male: gallo (rooster, cock). The same as English really.
Calling some meat on a plate "gallina" would be the same as calling a plate of chicken "a hen"--it would probably cause some laughing. Some other countries might do things differently, though.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Bettrave, ever heard of it? Described to me as a "weed" and used for seasoning

Sounds incredibly like the Chilean Spanish word for beet: Betarraga (regular Spanish is...I forget).

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics
1

Whatever happened to Mon Cheri hazelnut chocolates?

I only knew the chocolate-covered cherry liqueur version.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

How long will you stand in line for food?

If given a choice (since line standing might have to be tolerated due to no options), only a couple minutes tops.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics

Do you use your stove for storage ?

Until about three months ago I kept pots and pans in the oven. They'd be removed and put on the stove when using the oven--this all due to having a small kitchen. Then, three months ago, I got the washing machine moved into a bathroom hooking it up there where a tub was taken out (now it's a "laundry room" with a toilet-sink-washing machine combo). The washing machine space was replaced with a cupboard, and voilá I have an oven that's just an oven.

Feb 28, 2015
Wawsanham in General Topics