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Wawsanham's Profile

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Let's talk about white bread

Isn't the category "white bread" bigger than just "wonder" or "bimbo" bread? What about all the crusty rolls, sourdough, baguettes, etc...? Lots of white bread all over the place--especially if you think of American, Latin American, French, British, Italian bread traditions.

Jul 14, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Why boil brats?

Well, I don't know about boiling it in beer--seems a bit gussied up and twee. As for boiling, that's the main way I know them. For me, the grilled version is the exception--grill parties, maybe street food in Germany. My mom and grandmother were German, and at home we ate them about 3-4 times a month (a staple)--ALWAYS boiled.

Jul 14, 2014
Wawsanham in Home Cooking

Simple is better than exotic for some foods

I think there's room in the world for both trends. Personally, I tend to like and respect simple quality foods though sometimes some over the top mixed up stuff is great too.

Jul 14, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

What not to do at a farmers market

Well, if they load up at some store and then re-sell it, they very well could have bananas, or even mangos. I guess someone could say "I only buy from these Amish because I'm to lazy to go to the supermarket; I don't care if I'm buying re-sale stuff."

Jul 10, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Onions. Do you "count" them as a vegetable when planning a meal?

Hi,

Onion technically is a vegetable, just as tomato is technically a fruit, etc... but I digress. Despite this, it is often/usually considered a condiment because of the smallish amount that is consumed. I think that if you increase its serving size to a "regular serving size" (such as you'd do with peas, or green beans, or asparagus, or whatever) it would be a vegetable--at least as far as portions are concerned. The same would be true if you only at a spoonful of peas, carrots, or artichoke: would that count as a vegetable?

Jul 07, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Restaurants are inappropriately using flour tortillas instead of corn? :(

Come to think of it, these tortillas were as sides to all kinds of dishes--sort of like dinner roles, I guess.
I do remember enchiladas always seeming to be with flour tortillas, though. Perhaps the San Diego of the 70s was largely influenced by the most adjacent part of Mexico.

Jun 25, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Who Stole the Kieshka?

It might also be sold under the name "Kaszanka" (translates as "Kasha sausage")--that's the same: barley groats with blood sausage matter (pig snout, etc...). Wonderful stuff!

Jun 25, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

What does "eating healthy" mean anymore?

Yes, besides, millions of people have (or had) diets high in wheat, and many of them made it to a ripe old age. Perhaps, the element in the Western (or American) diet that gave her problems wasn't the wheat but rather all the snickers bars and pringles potato chips. ;)

Jun 25, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

What does "eating healthy" mean anymore?

Without reading any other posts, I'd say eating "sensibly" (sorry, whatever that means)--in moderation. Then, at some point, get a physical including blood work (cholesterol, triglicerides, etc...) and see how it's working for you. If you have a clean bill of health, feel good and look good, then, I guess you are healthy.

Jun 25, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

what do Germans eat?

I don't think it's too regional as I tried to be pretty non-specific. In Hamburg, my region of specialty, there might be more fish (hering or even eel dishes), but I'd say the overall look should be similar--even going beyond Germany to Poland (which I know very well) or some other Central European countries, it should be quite similar with the differences just in the specialty dishes (more of this and less of that so to speak). In the Rhine-Main region where you're going they're famous for wines, and also apple wine. They probably eat a few more dumpling type dishes, too.

Jun 25, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Favorite dessert by nationality?

Supposedly the lucuma stuff is Chilean--but who knows, considering the rivalry between Chile and Peru over pisco sour. However, I do believe that the lucuma plant is native to Chile not Peru (but, I could be talking out of my ear).

Jun 20, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Are there any American Restaurants in Europe?

Corn on pizza seems to be popular just about everywhere outside of the US and Italy. Right now in Chile, Telepizza (an awful cardboard pizza chain from Spain) is offering various special pizzas with corn and other ingredients in celebration of the Soccer World Cup and Brazil with names like "Copacabana" and "Carioca" for the pizzas--the ad's on TV a lot.

Jun 20, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Are there any American Restaurants in Europe?

Imbiss means "snack" not necessarily fast food. A snack stand might be "eine Imbissbude"

Jun 20, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Restaurants are inappropriately using flour tortillas instead of corn? :(

Growing up in Southern California in the 60s and 70s (until 1981), I remember both flour and corn tortillas being common--and often you were offered a choice of either one. I absolutely DO NOT remember corn tortillas dominating; it was half and half.

Jun 20, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

We all do it........7 foods for better bowel movements!

Coffee, fresh fruit, salad--all work for me

Jun 20, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Why Don't the Chinese Eat Outside?

Isn't most outdoor dining done under umbrellas? If that's so, then those who want to avoid the sun can do so. Also, in the US is it really only white people who eat outside? Perhaps, it's a class issue, not race? Or something else...

If my memory serves me, wasn't outdoor dining very rare not so long ago in the USA, even 30 years ago? It seems that with more exposure to French and Italian, "European" cafe style (as well as parts of South America), the popularity of sitting out on the sidewalk has caught on. Perhaps, the Chinese are not such francophiles in their dining habits (yet).

Jun 06, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Fat. What's your choice ?

Mostly grape seed oil, some olive oil (not for cooking), some butter, the very occasional use of lard.
I'd buy more types of oils, but I'd have my small kitchen covered in bottles of oil, besides, it's too expensive, so two good oils will have to do.

May 09, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

why do processed foods taste so bad

I guess you're talking about this sort of "industrial processing" of food.
Yet, it seems to sell really well, so someone must like it. Even if it's just lots of sugar and/or salt. But, people tend to love those basic tastes. Over time, if this is the food that you're used to it will shape your taste perceptions. I think taste is a very personal thing.

May 09, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

What Is the Most Onion-Heavy Cuisine?

Maybe, the statistic looks at onions bought, not just consumed, so it leaves out onions consumed in restaurants. Perhaps, the French are having their onion soup not at home... Or I'm totally wrong.

May 09, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Dutch food for book club meeting??

As far as I know, the Dutch eat a boiled kale with potato (and sausage, perhaps?) dish. I'm not clear on this, but have heard that they have a dish like this, that it is quite traditional. I know the Northern German version.

May 09, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Whatever Happened to Roquefort Dressing in Restaurants?

Maybe, the American dining landscape is so trend-oriented that things just pass out of fashion. This may have happened to Roquefort--which if you're one of it's fans is really a shame.

May 09, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics
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House Hunters & Kitchens

Yes, I get a good laugh out of the kitchen pickiness--especially the size "dilemmas!"

I have a kitchen that is about 8 feet long and 5 or 6 feet wide and includes a washing machine, oven, fridge, counters (not granite), cupboards, and a maximal use of space, to say the least. I'm used to it, but cooking in it takes certain "spatial and planning techniques". Of course, I have to store my pots and pans in the oven, and move them around when using the oven. All kinds of adaptations must be made to function there, not to mention that it's a "One Cook at A Time" kind of place. I'd like something a bit bigger, but it's what I got.

May 06, 2014
Wawsanham in Food Media & News

Stuffed cabbage--country of origin

Yes, her "holupture" would seem to be quite similar to the Halubcy or Holubtsi words.

May 06, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

The internet ruined me!

I guess now you can just create your own food porn and post it on your blog! Get them to look at that.

May 06, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Food Republic's 100 Culinary Terms

I also didn't know that a hootenanny was an Amish puffy pancake. I thought a hootenanny was a kind of party, sort of like a hullaballoo ( a lot of noise).

May 02, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Food Republic's 100 Culinary Terms

They forgot one of my absolute favorite cooking terms: BAIN-MARIE
I love it for its combination of elegance and cuteness.

May 02, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Why do chinese restaurants insist on having "secret" Chinese menus their English-Speaking customers can't decipher?

It's my impression that it's illegal in the US to discriminate against people based on their (perceived) race or nationality in a public service establishment, such as a restaurant. A restaurant that withholds dishes as options from certain customers DESERVES to be sued. Case closed.

May 02, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

Why do chinese restaurants insist on having "secret" Chinese menus their English-Speaking customers can't decipher?

Chinese people don't understand Occidental culture. There are certain things you cannot understand and therefore never become. A Chinese person cannot enjoy pizza, hot dogs, or tacos like an American can--even though they both are humans. You are not Occidental/White/American/Greek/etc... you should stick to your Chinese menu.
How does that sound, santinovalen?

Why do chinese restaurants insist on having "secret" Chinese menus their English-Speaking customers can't decipher?

Very right you are!

May 02, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics

When food is wrongly named....

You said what "Westerners consider caesar salad dressing"--I'm just saying to be careful when using a very broad term like that since it includes a lot of people; the term shouldn't be conflated from "Americans" (or North Americans or USians). It's a very, very broad category similar to saying "Asians" (which could mean everything from Israelis to Koreans). Besides, if the restaurant was geared toward Westerners (maybe, foreigners would be better as there might be the occasional non-Srilankan, non-Westerner) maybe a lot of those Westerners didn't know the difference. Just as a lot of Westerners don't know what scrapple, kolacky, or tortilla espaƱola are--despite being "Western" dishes.

Apr 27, 2014
Wawsanham in General Topics
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