rakip's Profile

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Edible Chinese take out in Hamilton?

Please tell me the name of your favourite Chinese take out in Hamilton. I've always liked the Shanghai on Lawrence Road but it's not very convenient. I live in the other end of the city.

Oct 09, 2012
rakip in Ontario (inc. Toronto)

Himalya; vegetarian Indian food in Hamilton

My favourite East Indian restaurant in Hamilton, vegetarian or non-vegetarian. Just a few tables, lots of take out. Wonderful sweets boxed in exquisite containers - great hostess/host gift if Indian sweets are a favourite. Himalya is like my favourite Indian 'diner'.

Oct 09, 2012
rakip in Ontario (inc. Toronto)

Recommendations for the Harbour Diner in Hamilton?

I recently had the lobster mac and cheese. I found the gooey cheesy macaroni overpowered the taste of the subtle lobster. Lobster, itself seemed a bit tough. Wouldn't order it again.

Oct 09, 2012
rakip in Ontario (inc. Toronto)

Ideas for leftover fresh basil?

If you don't think you can realistically finish up those bunches of cilantro and basil, share with a friend. I usually manage to use up half bunches - I live alone. Hate to waste.

May 18, 2012
rakip in Home Cooking

Cooking Club of America

Thank you for starting this extensive discussion on CCA. I'll fill their 'offer' under "G".

Oct 05, 2011
rakip in Not About Food

Most of my salary is spent on ______ food.

I'm retired and on a fixed income so I have to plan my shopping strategically.. I invest a considerable amount of my food money in a half-share with a local organic farm. The farm supplies me with generous amounts of fresh, seasonal vegetables and some fruit. Since I prepare many Asian meals, I spend frugally on proteins but I do include some fresh fish (not much), frozen fish, fresh shellfish (mainly mussels and clams) and a little meat. The rest of my food income is consumed by condiments, spices, fresh herbs, etc. Eating well and healthily is a high priority for me. As another chowhound noted: Rent+bills+foods= almost nil.

Aug 15, 2011
rakip in General Topics

best or favourite market in the world?

I, too am not a world traveller but we have many multi-vendor indoor-outdoor markets that are marvellous. I love Byward Market in Ottawa: fresh produce, meats, flowers, boutique stalls with hats, original design clothing for all the family and of course beaver tails and maple syrup. The Byward has bistros, 'ethnic' grocery stores, an outstanding boulangerie, a superior kitchen supply store, a Provencal toiletry store, etc., etc., on its periphery. I literally 'lose mysel'f in its largesse of produce, products, sights, smells and sounds. Definitely, a market to enjoy if you're lucky enough to visit Ottawa.

Jul 24, 2011
rakip in General Topics

What can I make with my first English cucumber?!

I slice the peeled cucumber very thinly and place two or three layers on the bread. This is like English tea sandwiches in depth but still has plently of flavour.

Jul 09, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

What can I make with my first English cucumber?!

The best thing that can happen to a cucumber, is a cucumber sandwich. I like mine plain, just bread, butter, thinly sliced cucumber, peeled please, with salt and freshly ground pepper. Homestyle wholewheat bread with seeds is my bread choice.

I have a Proustian memory of being served such a sandwich by my grandmother. A moisture-beaded glass of cold chocolate milk (from the dairy across the street) accompanied this cucumber bliss.

Jul 09, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

What is your cluinary point of view?

How encouraging that your health issues resulted in a whole, new and refreshing attitude to cooking and eating. I had a similar culinary rebirth although I had always enjoyed cooking, even eating alone which can be a luxurious experience but most of all, it's rewarding to eat with others. Food is meant to be shared in every instance, hence 'soup kitchens', food banks and collective kitchens, potlucks, family and extended family meals. I always admired and endorsed the late Laurie Colwin's stance on the former. (Laurie wrote several novels, two excellent cookbooks and was a regular contributor to Gourmet Magazine.)

Eat local foods when you can, support small, independent food businesses and organic, sustainable farms. As you eat seasonal foods, savour each fresh asparagus spear and sweet pea and carefully raised and butchered pig, if that's one of your culinary projects.

Jul 06, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Help with Asparagus

I like this asparagus pesto recipe, made with my favourite vegetable. I also make a spinach-basil pesto. I'm going to try kale pesto as I have a surplus, but I suspect it will overpower the basil or conflict with the basil's great flavour. Any one tried this?

Jul 06, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

No Special Treatment for Vegetarians at Barbecues

As a gluten-free guest, I bring my own dinner essentially and don't expect any special considerations or grill concessions. I often bring a dish, e.g., veggies for grilling that everyone can enjoy.

Jul 06, 2011
rakip in Features

What were your FIRST three cookbooks?

I love Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens. The line drawings are quaint and the volume is folk history as well as old Nova Scotia recipes. I have made many of the recipes - they're good and true to the culinary spirit of Nova Scotia. Great reference book if you love the Maritimes as I do.
'

Jul 05, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

What were your FIRST three cookbooks?

I was married in 1965 and my first cookbook purchases were The Fannie Farmer Cookbook (1957, Bantam paperback, $.95), Let's Cook It Right, Adelle Davis, 1970, Signet paperback, $ 1.50) and The Art of Jewish Cooking, Jennie Grossinger (1965, Bantam paperback, .$60). I also cooked from Gourmet magazine recipes, my own handwritten collection, my mother's Goodhousekeeping Cookbook and a treasure which I ultimately inherited,, Three Meals A Day, Jessie Read , 1946, Toronto Telegram publication, 1946 (a daily newspaper now long defunct). Three Meals A Day, a post-war effort, is still my handy reference when a small amount of food has to go a l-o-n-g way and taste good.

Jul 03, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? July 2011 [old]

Baking powder biscuits for strawberry shortcake. I prefer biscuits to sponge cakes or angel food cake with strawberries. Since I bake gluten free food, I 'cheat' and use a wonderful mix from Duinkerken Foods, Charlottetown, P.E.I. I prided myself in my ordinary biscuits but these are superior. Sometimes a mix is the route when G.F. baking. By the time 3 or four expensive flours have been bought plus leavening agents, it's sometimes more expedient to use to a mix - not always. I like cookies, cakes and loaves baked from scratch.

Jul 01, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Ruined Roast - Ideas to salvage and repurpose?

Although not as seasonal as BBQ sandwiches, an inspired remake, the roast could be cut into cubes and made into a beef stew. For liquid use a flavourful stock and a good glug of red wine, copious garlic and maybe some mushrooms and pearl onions. I've salvaged 'ruined steaks' in this fashion. There's almost always culinary first aid.

Jul 01, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Kale Crisis

I have tried kale chips and I'm in the minority in my opinion of them. I was entirely 'under-whelmed'. I did use them up crushed up in casseroles and salads but I prefer dulse with its crunchiness and natural salt and minerals. Kale is wonderful in soups and I made a curried kale dish that was a success.

Jun 30, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Special Homemade Mayonnaise

Sounds intriguing, 'true thinking outside the box'. The beef flavour, if it sucessfully amalgamates into a mayonnaise would perhaps restrict its use but it would be dynamite on a cold beef salad or with garlic cloves added could be a beef aioli to be served with slices of cold roast beef. Keep us posted.

Jun 28, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Kale Crisis

I need some kale recipes for my kitchen. I'm getting weekly kale from my organic farm share and need some fresh inspiration. Please help.

Jun 28, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Canadians--tell me your favourite recipe from Mom or Grandma

My mother was French Canadian and my father, Scots so tourtiere served with home-made chili sauce (sweet-spicy) and excellent shortbread were seasonal treats. Tourtiere was served after mid-night Mass with pickled beets, raw green onions and cubed, creamed potatoes. (The last dish isn't strictly a tourtiere accompaniment.)

Good everyday meals included macaroni, tinned tomatoes (cold) with grated Cheddar cheese over all. This dish might make others cringe but it was a big hit in our household. Beef stew chocked full of mushrooms, pearl onions, good homemade beef broth and red wine was a birthday favourite - Mum's version of a boeuf daube. Codcakes, fishsticks, kippers, sardines, freshwater trout, sole and halibut were served at my father's request - he'd eat anything with fins but wasn't keen on shellfish. He was a demon fisherman who occasionally brought home the catch.

My mother made a wonderful New England clam chowder: tinned clams, cubed potatoes and onions, celery, diced bacon, butter and milk or cream. I later lived in the Maritimes and used salt pork instead of bacon and freshly shucked clams harvested by moi. I loved and still love clam chowder and have been known to eat it cold for breakfast or anytime.

We didn't have sweets for dessert as my mother was a terrible baker. Her tourtieres at Christmas were her only foray into the world of baking. We ate fruit, jello, rice pudding, egg custard and junket. Does anyone eat junket these days? Dairy desserts were often the ending to a meal.

I did enjoy date squares, fruit cake, butter tarts, homemade cookies and pies at my aunt's. She was a superb baker.She made and decorated my wedding cake. Easter at her house always included custard pie: baked egg custard in a pastry shell, and homemade chocolates. My grandfather was a chocolatier and my aunt used his Easter molds to make Easter confections.

I enjoyed a rich and varied cuisine that included foods specific to my ethnic background, plus quick and easy budget meals, planned and prepared by a harried mother of four small children. Although she did have a subscription to Gourmet magazine few of Gourmet's complicated recipes of the 50's and 60's aappeared on the table.

Jun 28, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Help with Asparagus

Sorry your asparagus season has ended. We're just winding up ours here in Southern Ontario. I forgot to include an important spring element. Add fresh mint leaves, cut into ribbons (or torn) to the pasta-asparagus-olive oil-cheese melange. Here's to a good crop next year.

Jun 28, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Help with Asparagus

One of my spring favourites is pasta of choice carefully combined with lightly steamed asparagus. Cut the asparagus after steaming before combining with pasta. Anoint the pasta mixture with a good olive oil and top with freshly grated Parmesan or Asiago and toss together lightly. Serve at room temperature.

Jun 27, 2011
rakip in Home Cooking

Strawberry Fool

According to "Joy of Cooking": "...substitute 1 cup honey for 1 1/4 cups sugar and [to] reduce the liquid in the recipe by 1/4 cup". Perhaps reducing the whipping cream would do the trick. 3/4 cup cream will still give an adequate volume of cream to incorporate with the strawberry mixture.

Jun 27, 2011
rakip in Recipes

What Do You Wear When You Cook?

Like Ms. De Laurentis, I too like to look sophisticated while cooking chez moi but I achieve 'the look' by wearing apparel that matches the plats du jour. For French food, my beret, for Spanish (or Mexican) my mantilla, since the recent Royal wedding, I wear a fascinator (feathered). I eschew headgear when I'm preparing Canadian or American food. I prefer the June Cleaver look: my best string of pearls and my frilly heirloom apron. I must admit that some evenings, very few, I too wear jeans and my best stained tee. (I keep everyone out of the kitchen those evenings.)

Jun 16, 2011
rakip in Not About Food

Breakfast in Hamilton, Ontario

The Sunrise is the nearest 'greasy spoon'/diner in my neighbourhood. Breakfast there is as good as it gets anywhere in Hamilton, if you are looking for your basic eggs and bacon/sausage/ham combo. The Sunrise will meet that challenge. It's relatively quiet - no multiple TV's for me at breakfast. The breakfast waitress is unfailingly cheerful and helpful if you have a special request, e.g., I'm gluten-intolerant and bring my own bread. She offered to toast it for me! That's thoughtful service. Peameal bacon is particularly good and not greasy, eggs are cooked as ordered. Good place to ease into the day....

May 15, 2011
rakip in Ontario (inc. Toronto)

Can I Use a Coupon on a Date?

I've never considered coupons as 'hip'. Their primary purpose is to bring business en masse through the door NOT to save the consumer money. That said, careful choice of coupon for an establishment or product you really want, makes sense but don't use one on a first date - not a positive first impression. Use dining coupons with people you know resonably well.

May 01, 2011
rakip in Features

Good Food in Hamilton?!

Don't let the downtrodden neighbourhood put you off or the tired facade of the restaurant. Some money could be spend on a new sign outside and on updating the interior. These remarks aside, the food and service here is ace. The food is prepared with best ingredients, and with skill and attention to presentation. Service is a throwback to the friendly and solicitous service found in best hotel dining rooms in the '60's. The Purple Pear is a funky, rather retro restaurant with the right things in place. The rack of lamb with its vegetable accompaniments is superb and salads are excellent. Steaks are average. Lobster is a popular choice and is good. Try it!

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Purple Pear
946 Barton St E, Hamilton, ON L8L3C5, CA

Apr 16, 2011
rakip in Ontario (inc. Toronto)