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Slow roasting a venison shoulder

A local store that sells wild boar shoulder? That's pretty sweet. We get some uncommon fruits and veggies around here sometimes, but as far as meats it doesn't get much more exotic than ground bison. I did find shad roe once a few years ago. I comb the fish sections every spring but have never seen it again.

Dec 28, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

Always a possibility I suppose. I've had pretty good luck in the past cooking big haunches of meat though. I've been at this cooking thing for 25 years or so. :)

Dec 28, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

The plan is to cook it ahead and then refrigerate it. That way it will slice instead of shred. Once it's sliced I can reheat it for serving. It works nicely for pork shoulder, I would think that it would for venison as well. Besides, then I have time to do all of the last minute stuff.

Dec 28, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

You're right, a braise would bring some much needed moisture to the party. I got a giant roaster oven for Christmas so I was thinking about using that. I wonder if I could use a roasting bag in that, or if it would even be necessary since the oven claims to have a "self basting lid".

A lot of folks share the opinion that venison shoulder roast isn't worth bothering with and it should be ground. We get venison so rarely though, since no one in my family is a hunter. So I want a preparation that allows the flavor of the meat to come through.

So, at this point I'm thinking about a brine with lemon, rosemary, garlic and peppercorns. Then cut small slits into the roast and stuff them with garlic and bacon. Season with more rosemary, lemon zest, salt and fresh pepper, and then cook it in a low and slow braise side by side with a pork shoulder that has been similarly prepared. 200 would keep it right below the boiling point, and if I start it two days before I can test temp and tenderness and pull each roast at it's peak. Then wrap them up until they're cold, slice them thin against the grain with a sharp knife, reheat and serve side by side on a platter with the defatted and reduced cooking liquid as a sauce. Now I just have to decide what the cooking liquid will be. A combination of wine and stock maybe? I have a little bit of smoked turkey stock left in the freezer, and some pork stock from an experiment with pigs feet. (The same neighbor cleaning out her freezer again.)

Okay, now I'm just wool gathering. Thanks for the help and inspiration everybody! I'll let you know how it all turns out.

Dec 28, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

Wow! That sounds amazing! I hadn't thought about brining, but I suppose it would make a difference. I have somehow managed to live my entire life having never heard of Sel Fou, so I had to look it up. It sounds divine! I'll have to see if I can find some dried horseradish this week and toss some together to send home with my cooking friends, (keeping a generous portion for my own spice rack of course.)

Dec 28, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

I was one of those who would diss it until I tasted the results. My MIL roasted her turkey in a Reynolds bag one Thanksgiving. I was skeptical, but it was a lovely bird. Juicy and flavorful. I still don't use them often, but I wouldn't turn my nose up at them either.

Dec 28, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

Good idea! Those things are amazing. Thank you for the suggestion.

Dec 27, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking
1

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

Good to know. Thanks for your help!

Dec 27, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Slow roasting a venison shoulder

My neighbor was cleaning out her freezer and called me to see if I could put a venison shoulder to use. I happily agreed to take it off her hands and have been saving it for a special occasion. Well, we are having friends over for New Year's Eve and I was thinking about roasting that venison. My plan was to incise the meat and stuff in slices of garlic and frozen lardons of bacon, and then I wondered if cooking it alongside a pork shoulder would help to keep it from drying out. Would the two flavors meld well? I can always remove one roast and let the other one continue to cook if they finish at different times. Cooking them the day before and then allowing them to cool before slicing and reheating would be helpful, but I don't know if the meat would be improved by that treatment or if it would suffer. My other question; I have seen many articles that suggest cooking venison to no more than medium to prevent dryness. However, I was under the impression that wild game should always be well done because of the risk of parasites. Have I been misinformed? Thanks for any help that you can offer.

Dec 27, 2014
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Casual restaurant North or East of Baltimore, open on Monday.

Well, I made reservations at The Seasoned Mariner, then had to cancel them when my cousin got delayed at another stop and couldn't make dinner. Thank you both for your replies though. I will keep them in mind when I am next in the Baltimore area. Oh, and the "no traffic" request was for my husband. He already had to drive his regular commute that day so he wanted to avoid the city. Since he was driving an hour and a half on a week night to hang out with my family, I thought I would be obliging.

Casual restaurant North or East of Baltimore, open on Monday.

Having done a little more research, I'm thinking about The Seasoned Mariner. Has anyone tried this place?

Casual restaurant North or East of Baltimore, open on Monday.

Hi folks,

I have a cousin driving down from Pennsylvania for the day and we are going to meet up near Baltimore for dinner, (We're coming from Southern Maryland). I would like to take them someplace that gives them a taste of the local flavor. I was all set to send them the link to Mr. Bill's Terrace Inn when I realized that they are closed on Mondays. I'm looking for someplace casual and comfortable and I'm trying to stay out of the city to avoid heavy traffic. Seafood would be great, but I'm open to other suggestions as well. Thanks!

Pan-Seared Radishes with Miso Butter

This was wonderful. I happened to have some daikon in the fridge that I needed to use up when I saw this recipe. I had to cut down the cooking times a bit, but they worked perfectly. The greens on the daikon were a little sparse, so I threw in some mixed cooking greens. The miso butter was truly delicious.

Feb 07, 2013
faeriefolk15 in Recipes

The new rice guidelines

I went looking for a recipe and this was the first one that popped up. Mr. Bittman has never steered me wrong.

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.co...

Oct 02, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

The new rice guidelines

I know what you mean. I have dozens of gadgets that I use a couple times a year. I kind of love having a tool for every job though.

Oct 02, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

The new rice guidelines

Now that I wouldn't worry about. You see, I spent the last few years building up an immunity to iocane powder.

Oct 02, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

The new rice guidelines

Wow, that sounds delicious! I'll have to try it.

Oct 02, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

The new rice guidelines

One of my best friends is Japanese and he bought me a rice washer/strainer. It has nice little lines up the sides to rub the grains against and tiny holes at the bottom for draining. It looks kind of like this one, only mine isn't a neat shade of green:

http://www.longshida.com/english/M.Ri...

Oct 02, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

The new rice guidelines

Thanks for your input everyone! I did read the related posts and the Atlantic article. I wouldn't be so concerned about it, but my husband eats white rice 3-4 times a week and has since he was a kid. Since we use Thai jasmine rice pretty much exclusively, I'll go back to cooking it in the rice cooker. Otherwise the poor man might starve.

I will, however, try brown rice on the stove with the 1 cup of rice to 6 of water ratio. I think it might hold up better than the white did, and I would really miss my brown rice with parmesan, leftover veggies and an egg on top breakfast.

Here is a link to a Washington Post article that includes the cooking guidelines:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/busines...

Also, the jook was really delicious. I stirred in some soy sauce, a drop of sesame oil, and some diced chicken breast. Then topped it with julienned cucumber, chopped steamed broccoli, the pickled bok choy, and an egg. Very filling too.

Sep 29, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

The new rice guidelines

My husband loves white rice, and usually eats it several times a week. After the recent warnings about arsenic, I was concerned and I decided to try cooking rice the way that the FDA is recommending, one cup of washed rice to six cups of water. First, I tried using our trusty rice cooker, and essentially I didn't keep a close enough eye on the time and I ended up with jook. (Luckily I pickled some bok choy earlier this week, so we'll have that for breakfast tomorrow.) Then I tried again on the stove, simmering it for exactly 20 minutes. That came out a little better, but the texture is still not great. More minute rice than jasmine.

So my husband, (who thinks that the whole thing is kind of overblown anyway) thinks we should just go back to washing it and using the rice cooker with the old ratio. I'm willing to do that, but I am still concerned about the arsenic. So I wanted to see what my favorite bunch of online cooks is doing about this whole thing. (I don't post here much but I read a lot and this is the first place that I come when I have a food related question.) Are you making any changes to your rice consumption and/or preparation? My daughter and I used to eat a lot of brown rice but, since the arsenic levels in brown rice are much higher than in white, we've given it up. I'd appreciate your opinions.

Sep 28, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

do you buy "ends" (rejects)?

I always scan the clearance sections at my local grocery stores. They're hit or miss, one store routinely has great discounts on organic and gourmet packaged foods, another has amazing meat deals. The meat goes directly into my freezer when I get home, unless I plan to use it that night. I got burned exactly once on some buffalo steaks that I just couldn't pass up. I suspected when I opened the package that they were past their prime, but I cooked them anyway. The smell of them cooking confirmed it and resulting buffalo fajitas hit the trash can. The store gave me back the non-discounted price of the meat for my trouble though. After that I always look meat over carefully before I buy it, I will even give it a sniff to the dismay of my teen-aged daughter. If I have even a hint of a doubt I leave it, no matter how good the deal. It frustrates me so much when stores wait to put the discount stickers on meat until it is actually spoiling. What a waste!

I wish that I could find discount produce. The stores near me don't even set out the bags of discounted bananas any more. I have a large pet tortoise, so I've seriously thought about bargaining with the produce manager for bruised fruit or crushed lettuces. Snuffy does not care one bit.

The only thing I've consistently had bad luck with is deli case clearance items. They often taste vaguely of cleaning solution or deodorizer. Perfumed, but not in a good way. As a result I stay away from that deli department all together.

Being a cheapskate from way back, I have been dismayed to find that the clearance racks are looking a lot sparser than they used to. Also, the cheap cuts of meat have become trendy and the price has skyrocketed.

Farmer's markets are a great place to cut costs. Next year I am determined to buy into a CSA and to further expand my garden. Here's hoping that this drought won't be making a repeat performance.

Aug 02, 2012
faeriefolk15 in General Topics

Garlic in oil, again

Also, I should mention that I altered the original recipe slightly. I used four heads of garlic to one and one half cups each olive oil and corn oil. My husband vetoed the basil and red pepper, but I want to make another batch soon with those additions. The garlic, once pureed, makes a delicious spread for bread.

Aug 01, 2012
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Garlic in oil, again

I suppose not, unless you want to impress your friends with your ability to stick magnets to your abdomen. It is a clever repurposing of the word though.

The golden hued garlic cloves are in a colander now. The oil isn't as strong as store bought garlic oil is, but I think that it will add a lovely depth of flavor to dishes. The garlic cloves taste like a mild roasted garlic. Very smooth and creamy. As soon as they've cooled I'll give them a spin in the Cuisinart and toss the first batch into the ice cube tray. Now if only I hadn't given away all but one of my ice cube trays. This could take a couple of days.

Aug 01, 2012
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Garlic in oil, again

That sounds delicious! I decided to forge ahead and the garlic is currently simmering on the stove, but I may have to make a middle of the night foray out into the garden for some basil. Thanks for your help. Also, thank you for adding a new word to my vocabulary. (I had to look up swarf.)

Aug 01, 2012
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Garlic in oil, again

I know that this subject has been covered repeatedly on Chowhound, but I have a large quantity of garlic on hand and I'm looking for a work around that won't endanger my family.

I bought a big sleeve of garlic at BJ's yesterday. The last time I bought this much garlic, the last few heads were compost fodder by the time I got to them. But BJ's sells 5 heads of garlic for $3.50 and close to 40 heads (3 pounds) for $5.99. I use a lot of the stuff, so I bought in bulk.

I would like to use this recipe to use some of the garlic up:

http://www.cooking.com/recipes-and-mo...

My thought was that I would freeze the resulting oil and puree separately in ice cube trays, then store them in ziploc bags and toss cubes into the pan/sauce as needed. Would the long simmer and subsequent freeze be enough to keep botulism at bay?

Aug 01, 2012
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Turchetta with Vermouth Gravy

This was absolutely delicious and so much fun to make! It was time consuming and a lot of work, so give yourself plenty of time, but it all came together in the end. I made a couple of changes. I stuffed mine with wild rice, sausage, kale, garlic, onions, celery, herbs and finely diced mushrooms. Also, I thinly sliced some country pork ribs and marinated them with the turkey meat, then mixed them in with the white and dark meat when I did the layering. Other than that, I followed the directions, (In fact, I had them printed and clipped to the cupboard above my cutting board, which helped a lot.) I made two and brought them on a winter camping trip to feed a dozen people. Everyone was completely wowed. And what leftovers there were have been chopped up and tossed into the stock that I made from the turkey bones and scraps for a quick soup. Thanks for a great recipe. I can't wait to try this again.

Jan 16, 2012
faeriefolk15 in Recipes

More wonderful things to do with kimchi?

I like it with a fried egg, served over hot steamed rice. It makes a delicious breakfast.

...and now I'm hungry for kimchi.

Oct 14, 2011
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Twelve hour risotto?

I'm kind of inexperienced when it comes to veal. How long does it have to cook until it is not Jesus? Is that where the whole no meat on Fridays thing comes from? If you don't cook it long enough and you eat it with a glass of wine, does it count as communion? This is a confusing recipe.

Oct 14, 2011
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Twelve hour risotto?

I see. Thank you for the info! I was hoping for some mysterious risotto method that would blow my usual recipe out of the water. Ah well. That sounds amazingly delicious though.

Oct 14, 2011
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking

Twelve hour risotto?

Hi fellow cooks! I'm a new poster here but I've been reading this site for a while now. You all have saved more than a few dinners for me.

Tony Bourdain posted a picture of a Skradin Risotto on Facebook today. I did some research on the recipe and found that, while the recipe itself is a closely kept secret, it is often cooked for 10 to 12 hours. I'm interested in the process behind that. Would you just cook the rice at a bare simmer? Even then it seems as though it would be done in less than 12 hours. I looked for a slow cooked risotto recipe, but for the most part I got slow cooker recipes, and since my slow cooker doesn't know the meaning of "low heat" I don't think that would work. So I'm wondering if anyone has tried a very slow cooked risotto. I'm thawing my bone bag now, along with some chicken backs and feet, and once I have a potful of homemade stock I'd love to try this out. Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated!

Oct 14, 2011
faeriefolk15 in Home Cooking