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What do you make with your Thanksgiving leftovers?

I do love turkey pot pie as mentioned earlier.

Not a "recipe" but my new favorite way to use up left over stuffing is just by browning it in a waffle iron. Super crispy outside, still moist inside - and waffle shaped. I should have been doing that for years.

Oct 16, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

Thanksgiving menu question and unrelated baking/freezing question

I was going to suggest something similar to the puff pastry triangles but with phyllo dough. They freeze great and can be as hearty as you want to make the filling. (Chicken/Mayo/herbs or Turkey/Brie/Cranberry or Spinach/Cheese or etc/etc/etc).

If you end up not needing them, they can stay frozen and be used later for another party or for a light dinner with a salad.

Oct 15, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Salvaging gross breaded fish

Yeah but that 25 minutes of cooking time is probably from frozen - so it probably takes that long in an oven to thaw and cook . . .

Oct 14, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

sou vide machine experience

I also have had the polyscience for years (before there were multiple models) and it works great. It is loud for a home kitchen- I have no idea how it compares to the other brands that are now available though, they all could be the same.

There have been a lot of threads over the years on people's experiences with different SV models, so do a search too to find other's experience with specific models.

Oct 05, 2014
thimes in Cookware

Why boil brats?

It will taste good that way, no doubt - but do you need to do it that way, no.

Sep 30, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

How to deal with incorrect credit card charge?

That is the redirection I would expect from the guilty waiter.

While of course possible (all redirections are) the complexity required for that too happen would be insanely complicated.

But of course, a possibility.

Sep 29, 2014
thimes in Not About Food
1

homemade sausages

depends on what type of sausage you are making . . . . . do you mean fresh sausage or cured?

If you are talking cured sausage - see if your library has the book "Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, smoking, and curing" by Michael Ruhlman. It is a great resource. When it came out there were a LOT of blogs that were doing recipe testings/evaluations/etc. So you may find some good starting points online as well.

If you're talking fresh sausage - what has gone wrong?

Sep 29, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

How to deal with incorrect credit card charge?

I agree with the above post with one minor caveat. I would call the restaurant to let them know it happened but that you aren't looking to cause an issue over a $1 difference - you're sure it was just a mistake but feel they should know.

I say that because IF it is the server, the restaurant needs to know. A $1 difference for you is no big deal, but if the server is doing that to every charge - it does actually add up for the server and is criminal. And if they are getting away with it, they are likely stealing other things from the restaurant as well . . .

That way the restaurant - if they so choose - can spot-check the server to see if it was just a missed key or if it is systematic.

4 lunches in Madrid in mid-Sept; interesting food, 100-120 E a couple (w. wine)

I agree about the French at least being more willing to try to speak English. But there is still an expat community in Madrid (again smaller than in Paris) . . . .

anyway - my knowledge of both languages is mediocre but I can get around most of the time (though I learned Spanish from Cuban and Mexican teachers - so the "food words" are sometimes challenging when traveling in Spain) . . .

I just found it funny that not only do I feel like you'll get less English in Spain in general - you'll also have a much harder time with Google translate in Spanish than in French. When in France if I use Chrome to translate websites I can pretty much read the pages with no problems, when doing that with Spanish sites . . . . not so much. (I was just going through the reviews on the site Erica recommended above)

Just one of those subtle difference that I guess you don't appreciate when you live in the most "touristed" cities in countries in the world . . .

Sep 29, 2014
thimes in Spain/Portugal

4 lunches in Madrid in mid-Sept; interesting food, 100-120 E a couple (w. wine)

No, I don't know that one. Thanks! Will check it out today.

Sep 29, 2014
thimes in Spain/Portugal

Why boil brats?

Lol. Isn't that the question of this whole post essentially? Lol

No you don't have to boil/simmer a brat. And especially not in lots of butter.

If your brat is a raw brat I recommend simmering gently before grilling but that isn't necessary either if you're a low and slow griller.

Sep 29, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

4 lunches in Madrid in mid-Sept; interesting food, 100-120 E a couple (w. wine)

I'd love to hear where people discuss food/dining in Spain - the blogs I find are pretty weak too. They don't have to be in English . . . .

Sep 29, 2014
thimes in Spain/Portugal

Storage of duck confit? [moved from Prairie Provinces]

I think you're having problems because there is the "safe/expert" answer and the "anecdotal/life" answer.

"People" have kept duck confit - completely covered with an inch of fat - for months on end, even a year. It was "invented" long before reliable refrigeration was available.

But - that doesn't mean there isn't the opportunity for bacteria from your jar or or duck or your utensils to contaminate things and start producing bad things that you don't want to eat . . . . . which can technically take as little as a week . .

If you are wanting to do long term storage of your confit, I recommend freezing it. It freezes just fine, with no ill effects.

Sep 25, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

How to make soda flat ... quickly?

or just from a quick search if you want to go all chowhound on it . . .

http://www.splendidtable.org/recipes/...

Sep 24, 2014
thimes in General Topics

How to make soda flat ... quickly?

have you tried any of those "flavorings" for those "make your own soda at home" carbonators?

I haven't looked at the ingredients so I'm not sure about the caffeine part, but I'm sure the sugar is high. You could just mix them with water and not carbonate . . . .

Sep 24, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Dinner Menu for Wine Club Gathering

I understand other's reservations of not knowing the wine - especially since this is such a "food" site . . . .

But that said - I think it is great that you are doing a wine club and trying wines. If fact, I think that just doing this once a month will help your group get a great breadth of tasting and if you so choose get some experience of food/wine pairings - even if that experience is having a wine that you don't like with a specific dish.

So don't let the others turn you off.

My food recommendation, since you don't know what wine is being brought and you new to the whole food/entertaining thing - only make things that can be done ahead and held for dinner.

For me this means braises. I would do something like a chicken cacciatore (so many recipes online and easy to find and do). I would do it with chicken thighs, they are more forgiving in terms of being overcooked - and honestly they taste better to me and are a little more "meaty". That will work well for you since the meatiness of this type of dish can bridge the red/white wine issue. Likewise, you could do any type of braised beef as well (or stew/etc). The best part of this type of preparation is that it can be done ahead (even a day or two before) and reheated.

Depending on what you do you can serve it with rice or pasta with a green salad. The rice/pasta then is the only thing you have to "cook" (though it really takes little hands on time) when guests are there.

For dessert I would do something with berries. A trifle for example - again, easy to do, tastes great, can be done ahead. And the berries will be interesting with a wide range of wines.

As far as cheeses - I like cheeses with all sorts of "sweet" things. So not only think honey but also fresh figs or dried cherries/cranberries/etc. Instead of brie (which I love but good brie is hard to find in the US) I'd do Fromager d'Affinois. It is actually easier and easier for me to find and is very rich and buttery - a good counter to sweet in my opinion.

Have fun! Drink lots! Take cabs or have a DD!

Is pasta making just time and practice?

what do you mean "holes in it"? Actual holes or is the pasta sheet tearing or is it more or less "crumbling" when it is going through the rollers?

If it is the "crumbling" holes it could be one of two things - 1) the pasta dough was too dry or 2) your dough got too sticky (not enough flour on the outside when rolling) and the rollers are causing it to tear because it is essentially sticking to the rollers.

If the dough was too dry - that is harder to fix. It is hard to add just a little bit of flour to already made pasta dough. Lesson - it is always better to have your dough a little too wet because it is much easier to add a little more flour.

If it crumbled when rolling, you just need to dust a little more flour over your pasta sheet. But to fix the crumble, my recommendation is to fold the sheet in 1/2 THEN dust with flour and re-roll (you may have to back up a number depending on thickness). If you dust and then fold in 1/2 you run the risk of preventing the two sides from sticking back together and then when you get to the next number down, the flour pocket you created can cause it to tear again.

Hope those help if that was your issue. Home made pasta is the best, so keep on rolling!

Sep 22, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

"Old school" people who fry in cast iron . . . .

Exactly but since I was cooking for one this time it looked more like this. … ever measured your temps?

Ps I'm now a fan of foil to help with cleanup.

Sep 20, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

substitute for fleur de sel?

interesting solution. I "liked" a poster's response above because I do think Fleur de sel has a specific crystal structure that allows it to dissolve quickly on the tongue (as opposed to more solid crystals like those in Koser salt).

I'll have to try this to see if it creates that same "quick dissolving" structure.

Sep 20, 2014
thimes in General Topics

"Old school" people who fry in cast iron . . . .

So tonight I had a craving for fried chicken, which I haven't done at home for years, since there is a food truck (the kids these days with their trucks) a few blocks away with great fried chicken. But the food truck was closed with no reason given. So, having fried for years, I decided to make my own fried chicken (which turned out great, for those interested - and I made enough for a small army since I couldn't imagine just frying 2 pieces of chicken).

My question though is this . . . For those that have learned to "fry" in cast iron, have you ever actually measured the oil temp during frying?

I haven't before. I learned to fry chicken in cast iron from people who fried before thermometers were ubiquitous kitchen items. I know the oil is hot enough based on the bubbles that come up from the back of a wooden spoon . . . and then I know it is hot enough during frying based on the bubbles coming off the chicken.

This time (no reason why), I decided to put my thermometer in the oil while I was cooking. The chicken went in at about 360 - but it spent the next ~12 minutes slowly coming up from about 230.

When I read about frying, the "books" say to keep the temp at about 350 . . . is that "real" for you? Does your grease (or oil - but I learned to fry in Crisco) stay around 350 during frying? Really? or are you guessing?

Just curious about the "reality" versus "the theory" from people that are old school fry people . . . . .

**Ironically, the Splendid Table had a short piece on fried chicken tonight - that argued "gas station fried chicken in Virginia" used "fresh" peanut oil to fry their chicken . . . while I'm a fan of peanut oil for frying . . . I doubt the chicken is cooked in it . . . and I doubt it was "fresh" . . .just my life experience. . .

Sep 20, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Every Once In A While, Someone Invents Something Truly Amazing

Well isn't this cleaver. I couldn't find the direct video link.

Sep 19, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Issue roasting chicken thighs on foil lined baking sheet?

Like others said, just not long enough most likely. I cook until about 170 as well but with resting time you should have gotten to that temp anyway.

The timing and temp also depends on what type of thighs you were cooking. . . .

So yes, 20 minutes seems short for bone-in, skin on thighs - but if you were cooking boneless skinless thighs (which are getting more and more common in my grocery stores), the recommendation for 45 minutes will be too long . . . .

Sep 18, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

4 lunches in Madrid in mid-Sept; interesting food, 100-120 E a couple (w. wine)

Well, from reading your blog, it sounds like it wasn't a rousing experience overall. I'll have to keep doing some research before I go.

I have to wonder how CH "promotes" the international boards to get posters. You're right, France has a lot of contributors that have a lot of knowledge. If the Spain board has the same it is hard to see that.

But if you talk to a Spaniard, they certainly have passion about their food . . . so I don't know where the disconnect comes from - or why the Spain board doesn't have the same local interest as the France board.

I don't follow enough of the other international boards to know how they compare either . . .

Thanks for posting back.

Sep 17, 2014
thimes in Spain/Portugal

Easy hard boiled egg peeling tecnique.

I'm always surprised that people feel they have a tried and true method. I've tried all these methods and I'm at a 50%/50% chance of having them peel easily or being a total pain . . . . regardless of method and egg freshness.

Sep 17, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

4 lunches in Madrid in mid-Sept; interesting food, 100-120 E a couple (w. wine)

John - heading to Madrid in late October, so please post back on where you ended up. This board isn't as robust on restaurant options as the Paris board is, was hoping I'd find more but maybe it's nice that it isn't - can't decide right now.

Sep 15, 2014
thimes in Spain/Portugal

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Didn't mean to derail the thread and bring up an overdone thread.

In the spirit of this thread …

If there is no secret menu, then it isn't authentic because the authentic stuff in the US lives on that secret menu.

Sep 15, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Yeah, I've seen that thread. I may normally get bent out of shape over it - but this place is virtually on campus and most of those dishes would scare the hell out of most of the Ohio students (maybe they would like them but they would never order them), so in this instance I cut them some slack.

I know she has most of those dishes on the menu to give the foreign students a little taste of home while they are here.

Sep 15, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

For 99% of us this is easy . . . .

Before you go into the restaurant, look to the left, look to the right . . . are you in the USA? . . . then it isn't authentic.

I don't mean that sarcastically (okay a little) but finding the types of dishes that you'd actually get in China is very difficult in most of the US and for some reason people running Chinese restaurants don't feel compelled to recreate those dishes here.

The only restaurant in my town (Columbus, OH right now) that comes close is adjacent to the University, where we have a lot of foreign students, and they have 3-4 pages in the back of the menu that are all in mandarin - are dishes that aren't on the rest of the menu - and when you ask about them (unless you are VERY regular) she says "those aren't for you". LOL

Sep 15, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Fennel fronds

you could make a fennel pesto, that would use up a lot more than you may normally use, which you could then freeze in small portions.

Toss with pasta/rice etc to serve as a side with fish/grilled meat/etc. Add to soups.

Sep 15, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

What happens if you freeze raw kale?

I've never frozen it for a long period of time. But I do freeze it regularly when I'm going to put it in soup.

If you freeze the leaves - take them right out of the freezer - and crush them immediately you get great little shards of kale for soup/beans/etc. It's a great trick and it doesn't get slimy . . . . learned that from an Italian chef.

Sep 14, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1