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Polyscience Immersion Circulator

Fair enough - I can't see any of those situations being relevant for me but if they are for you that's great.

For me, the advantage of sous vide is that it has a pretty generous window for holding once something comes to temp - so I can't ever see being so delayed that I would need to turn down the bath.

I guess the ice bath to cooking bath could be interesting (though again not for me). I've never really done sous vide from a cold bath, always once the water comes to temp. I can't imagine that will make too huge a difference but if you try it, please post somewhere on how it works for you.

I can see a perk if it was able to send an alert if the machine malfunctions during long cookings (though chances are I wouldn't be able to just leave work to go home to "save" dinner).

One thing to be aware of with many wifi devices and notifications with respect to power outages. That alert is often triggered by the equipment, not the server. So for me in my house, when the power goes out so does my wifi - thus no notification.

If they get funding and you use it with wifi - let us know when it was useful - always looking for new ways to use my sous vide.

Aug 26, 2014
thimes in Cookware

Polyscience Immersion Circulator

Why would I need my sous vide circulator wifi enabled?

Aug 26, 2014
thimes in Cookware

Anyone still using chipped beef?

Thanks for sharing her recipe.

Aug 25, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Polyscience Immersion Circulator

I have their Chef series circulator - I bought it years ago before they had other, less expensive, versions. It is definitely "more machine" than I need - but it works great, though it is louder than I would like (I'm not sure how loud the newer models are or how other brands are). In a professional kitchen you'd never notice but if I'm doing something for a long time (48 hours/etc) I can hear it upstairs overnight.

Aug 25, 2014
thimes in Cookware
1

Tick bites that lead to red meat allergy

When humans are exposed to alph-gal through ingesting meat (which anyone who has eaten meat in their life has), we don't have a immune response to it.

However when the tic injects alpha-gal into our blood stream, our bodies react differently and mount an immune reaction.

Once that happens, the next time you eat meat, the body, which used to be fine with alpha-gal, now reacts differently causing this severe immune reaction.

calling those bakers!

Ah yes, of course. Sorry I misread (and mistyped) in my reply. Thanks

Aug 14, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

calling those bakers!

Yes you can do this (see caveat below). The baking soda will have two actions - one when combined with the liquid, and one when heated. So you will still get a rise.

My recommendation would be to agitate the batter as little as possible after it is mixed. So rather than remixing and/or pouring out the batter into the muffin pans, I would use an ice cream scoop and scoop out the batter to try to keep as many of the "first action" bubbles in the batter.

My only other concern with your recipe, is that I have not done this with a recipe that has so many "add-ins". If your raisins, apples, pineapple, carrots, nuts all settle out to the bottom of your batter - you may not have a choice but to re-mix to redistribute all those . . . . . that is something to consider with this specific recipe. If you do need to re-mix then you will be loosing a lot of the initial CO2 created by the baking soda, which could cause a problem. ... .... .it's a gamble given that, for this recipe.

Aug 14, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Witches Finger grapes

I would describe them in a very similar way as you did. Glad I tried them but nothing special other than their shape. They also are fairly small and the long shape makes for a higher skin to flesh ratio which was okay, just another observation.

Aug 13, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Tick bites that lead to red meat allergy

I just read an article about this too. It's crazy.

Aug 12, 2014
thimes in Food Media & News

Witches Finger grapes

So I like to think I've been around a little at my age, done some traveling, seen some things . . . . . but yesterday I was in a remote grocery store in Idaho and came across something I had never seen before -

witches finger grapes

Has anyone else seen these? How long have they been around? Has anyone tried them?

I regret not buying them, so I'm going back today to see if they still have them. I'm so curious, I'll report back if I can get them.

(Image just a grab from the internet)

Aug 12, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Cookbook recommendations as gift for amateur home chef?

I was going to suggest her first book - Barefoot Contessa. The recipes are very easy and straight forward, they taste great, and don't use any really unusual ingredients.

I get it for most "new cooks". I also think the photography makes the recipes approachable and unlike the "big" cookbooks, there aren't so many recipes that the book becomes overwhelming for a beginner.

The added bonus, you'd enjoy eating any of the recipes should she choose to cook for you.

Aug 11, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

Dessert Italian Style

I do love Italy and Italian food, but I have to say they are not really "know" for their desserts. While many of them taste great (peaches in wine is one of my favorites mentioned above), they are usually very simple. I don't think that is a negative in "real life" but if you're looking to Wow in a competition they don't typically have that wow factor. They more often rely on a great ingredient, often seasonal, which like I said is great but a competition dessert needs more than that. (Of course all IMHO).

Do you want to stay traditional Italian or "Italian inspired" as mentioned in your OP?

(I imagine I'm going to get pummeled for this one but I stand by it …)

Aug 02, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Got a whole carton of double yolk eggs from Costco

I certainly don't know what causes it - but your experience is the same as mine. I can go years and years without every seeing a double yolk and then all of a sudden I'll get one carton that seems to have 1/2 of the eggs with double yolks - never just one egg, always multiple eggs. Very strange indeed.

I have heard that young chickens are more prone to laying eggs with multiple yolks like mentioned above, still strange that so many end up in a single carton.

Aug 01, 2014
thimes in General Topics

Overlapping text

I think they were commenting that they could now read your time stamp because nothing was overlapping it.

Aug 01, 2014
thimes in Site Talk
1

Overlapping text

Fixed for me.

Aug 01, 2014
thimes in Site Talk

Dessert Italian Style

So not Italian but you could make it "Italian Theme" by making in the shape of Italy instead of a circle . . . ..

Paris Brest - best dessert ever if made well.

Aug 01, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Overlapping text

Mac OSX 10.6.8
Safari Version 5.1.10 (6534.59.10)

Just checked Chrome, wasn't happening in Chrome . . . .

Jul 31, 2014
thimes in Site Talk

Overlapping text

Wow is it irritating . . . and I can't believe it didn't show up when testing in different environments . . . . Here is a screenshot of MGZ's post so you can see chow people . . . .

Jul 27, 2014
thimes in Site Talk

Chicken Stock - Pressing Pause?

Well I'm certainly glad you didn't throw it away given your situation. And on a personal note - I make stock all the time and who on earth (I know many) has 6+ hours straight to keep their stock going. I always have to start/stop the process unless it's the middle of winter and I'm snowed in.

That said - for posterity - I want to re-address the "heat tolerant toxin" concern that comes up every time one of these questions comes up. First - it is a real concern and I don't mean to diminish it, I included it in my posted her too.

But a more realistic home cook scenario where those toxins may come into play would be something like this . . . . . it's Thanksgiving and you've had a great time. You wake up the next morning and realize someone left the carcass out over night. But you figure, you're making stock and it will boil for a few hours anyway . . . it will be fine . . . . .wrong . . . . . That carcass has been "in the danger" zone for hours and IF there were the wrong bacteria growing on it, they have had hours to produce said toxins. While the bacteria would be killed during the boiling, the toxins, to which people keep referring, would not be eliminated. This could be a potential problem.

Glad it worked out.

Jul 27, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking
1

Why does my bread turn out dense?

My advice was a combination of too much flour (above) and wetter dough (below). Too much flour, which is really easy to do if you're new to bread making, will bake for a dense dough but adding more flour makes kneading the dough "easier/less messy".

I'm guessing this is a primary problem, though not enough/too much rise time could be the issue too. You can sometimes trouble shoot the rise time issue by looking at the hole sizes from the top to bottom of the loaf once you cut it in half. If the holes are even from top to bottom - perfect - if they are really small on the bottom - possibly not enough rise time - if the loaf spreads out - possibly too much rise time . . . .

If you're really getting into bread baking I'd check out "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" from the library. It is a great resource to help you along the way.

Nothing better than fresh baked bread!

Jul 24, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Brick wood burning oven in the back yard [moved from General Topics]

My parent's neighbors used this book to build their oven. It isn't brick building per se - it is "mud/clay" building but the book had a lot of great details about proportions/etc. I have an earlier edition and have always wanted to build one myself.

http://www.amazon.com/Build-Your-Own-...

Jul 24, 2014
thimes in Cookware

Fait Maison

It's a very interesting position though from what I've read it is so full of strange loop holes I'm not sure it will work in its current state.

That said - Paris (and France) while insanely beautiful is a HUGE "food" destination and they have build their tourist reputation around cultivating that image. I'm sure someone has crunched the numbers and seen how insane the tourist restaurant revenue is to the city/country.

Loosing that image will definitely impact the bottom line of Paris, so I completely get why they are trying to do something about it. If the reputation of Paris becomes one of "reheated food from the same mega-producer" it will be very hard to recover.

So I applaud the effort but we'll see what happens with it all.

Jul 24, 2014
thimes in France

this is a good idea?

You never really know if it is a good idea until you give it a shot. It's a classic comfort food pairing so why not try. You may have to experiment with it for a while in different forms but that will part of the fun if you're into it. Shanghai is known for their soup dumplings so why not . . . .

I wouldn't be stuck on it having to be a cheese dumpling filled with tomato soup. Maybe in the end you'll decide it needs to be a dumpling dough made with pureed sun dried tomatoes and filled with cheese . . . . or regular dough filled with a tomato cheese mixture . . . . . play with the combinations to see what works best.

Like mentioned earlier, don't be afraid to play around with thickening up the tomato soup aspect too - gelatin/agar/etc/etc.

Sounds like a fun project!

Jul 24, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Worst Cooking show Buzzwords

"I'm giving it 110%" or "you need to give this 110%"

Not possible…

Jul 23, 2014
thimes in Food Media & News

Worst Cooking show Buzzwords

"made with Love" or "you can taste the love"

Jul 23, 2014
thimes in Food Media & News
1

Chicken Stock - Pressing Pause?

Not arguing to the validity of the toxin's presence - as I agree. This "toxins aren't killed" argument comes up a lot in these types of discussions (as they should, and as I mentioned in my earlier post). But keeping it to this topic and scenario. . .

If the stock has been simmered for 4-5 hours - anything in that stock is basically killed. And "technically" the stock will need to cool low enough and long enough to re-enter the "danger zone" - though what is really left in a covered pot to really bloom in the danger zone?

So as a procedural result - any toxin in the stock would have formed from the living organisms present before the first 5 hour simmer - so this "break" in the simmer isn't going to change that. Toxins don't multiply themselves, they are a result of the organism, which we all seem to feel should have been killed during the 5 hour simmer.

So in this instance, any toxin issue that you bring up would be the same risk before and/or after this break . . . no?

Jul 23, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Had a potato au gratin failure...need some pointers to fix it!

Sounds like your cheese sauce got too hot during the baking causing the cheese to separate - thus all the grease. It could have been too little roux too, you need that starch structure to help hold everything together.

Glad it still tasted good!

Jul 21, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Chicken Stock - Pressing Pause?

Just a quick web search . . . I still say you'll be fine - and it looks like these references support that, especially with simmering for another hour after your "time off" . . .

Sous vide temperature safety zones can be summarized as follow:
Sterilization zone: > 121°C (250°F) for at least 2.4 minutes
Assured Pasteurization zone: > 63°C + (145.4°F)
Start of Pasteurization zone: 60°C (140°F) – 63°C (145.4°F)
Tolerance zone: 55°C (131°C) – 60°C (140°F)
Danger zone: 50°C (122°F) – 55°C (131°F)
Extreme Danger zone: 20°C (68°F) – 50°C (122°F)

According to the Wilderness Medical Society…

Water temperatures at 160° F (70° C) kill all pathogens within 30 minutes.
Water temperatures above 185° F (85° C) kill all pathogens within a few minutes.

So in the time it takes for water to reach the boiling point (212° F or 100° C) all pathogens will be killed, even at high altitude. The moment your drinking water reaches a rolling boil, the water has already become safe to drink.


NOTE: Caveats regarding Safe Water Boil Times:

Boiling water will NOT remove chemical toxins that may be present.

Jul 21, 2014
thimes in Home Cooking

Chicken Stock - Pressing Pause?

for a couple of hours. . . I'm assuming 2 hours.

While not scientific at all, and of course I'm not a food safety expert - so take this with those caveats . . . .

I do this all the time and I've never died. You're simmering it for 5 hours (killed most everything) and then you're going to simmer for another hour . . . killing most everything again.

I just cover my stock and pick back up where I left off. No problems and no clouding issues for me either. Next time I'm going to take the temp when I turn the stove off and then again when I turn it back on - because it always still seems very warm (I know - bacteria love warm - I'm just saying it doesn't seem to cool off that much).

salty restaurant food in the US compared to europe?

I don't find it with salt but I certainly do with sugar when I come back to the US. Everything is so darn sweet.

Jul 20, 2014
thimes in General Topics
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