a

AlexH1980's Profile

Title Last Reply

Demel?

Demel fans

I would like to resurrect this thread and state that I have very positive results ordering online from Demel. A sachertorte (medium size) and a tin box of tea biscuits (pastries, really) was shipped to me in the US quickly and everything was delicious. However, I am of the camp that sachertorte is overrated in general, and, hoping for an epiphany, I found that the Demel sachertorte did not blow my mind. In fact, you could not even taste the apricot jam, it tasted like a simple chocolate cake made of chocolate of slightly-above-average quality. The tea biscuits were much more above-average and special.

Shop here:
http://www.demel.at/en/frames/index_s...

I do not know why there aren't thousands of Cafe Wiens or konditoreien in America. There are so many Germans in Texas, for example. We have many Americans of German or German Jewish descent. Why are we not paved with Viennese cafes? This is a sad state of affairs.

I doggedly pursue Cafe Sabarsky, but the food is just ok, the decor perfect, the service indifferent. Last time I went (recently), there was no music, nobody (I tend to go when it is not packed), one heard the refrigerators humming, and one was served slightly stale Dobostorte and smoked trout wraps no better than the kind served by room service at chain hotels.

Oct 19, 2014
AlexH1980 in Manhattan
2

Cafe du Monde style beignets in Austin Texas?

Ladies and gentlemen, with a heavy heart I pose this question in hopes of a positive reply. Where can I eat Cafe du Monde style beignets in Austin Texas? I am even willing to have non-CDM style beignets - any kind of of beignets. A search on this bulletin board comes up empty, and Google searches are not fruitful, either. You would think we are part of the South and therefore how hard is it to make fried dough? Hurricane Katrina brought quite a few people from New Orleans to Austin, where is their beignet source (besides their own kitchens)? Thank you.

Oct 19, 2014
AlexH1980 in Austin

Best Croissants?

Upper Crust Bakery on Burnet has good plain croissants. Not the authentic kind you find in Paris, but a good American Texan subspecies, nevertheless. Using the same croissant dough, they make sausage rolls (with really fat, greasy sausage and anise or caraway seeds!) and a mysterious thing called Texas Croissant - it is amazing. It's an oversized croissant filled with jalapenos and cheese and what seems to be picallilly or mustard sauce. It's all cheesy, melty, and pizza-y. It blows your mind. One's big enough to share among two people.

Mar 19, 2012
AlexH1980 in Austin

I know it's been discussed before, but... Ramen?

We absolutely *still* need a good, authentic ramen place in Austin, the kind in NY or Bay Area (since we're not in Japan) where there is always a line out the door. I've tried the ramen at Musashino and at Kome. They're decent but not amazing. Thanks to tips on this thread, I've decided to just make my own by buying the frozen ramen from Asahi Imports. I completely agree that that's the best one can do at this juncture in Austin. And I've tried all the yakitori tips mentioned in this thread, but I still believe we need a seriously good, authentic yakitori joint here. OR MAYBE IT'S TIME FOR ANOTHER TRIP TO JAPAN! If anyone discovers anything otherwise, please update us all! - Starving...

Mar 19, 2012
AlexH1980 in Austin

Need a GOOD Old School New York Suggestion

Firebird is very nice. Food much better than I thought. NYC Restaurant Week is on right now for them.

-----
FireBird
365 West 46th Street, New York, NY 10036

Aug 06, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan

Need a GOOD Old School New York Suggestion

Harvard Club is very nice. The food is so-so but the dining room is lovely and not many people go there for dinner esp. during the summers so it feels very mellow and quiet.

Aug 06, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan

Casa Mono - time restraints on dinner

This is a hectic place. Their food is good but it's not really authentic Spanish tapas (like the kind you have in Spain), it's more the New-York-City-modern-gourmet-chi-chi version of tapas, with price tags to match. All the wait staff were very professional and polished. Decent Spanish dry sherry selection, which is unusual for American restaurants. Fideua (they call it fideos, which is not fideua technically the purists tell me) is not very authentic but not bad to eat ($18 for tiny bit). Everything is super salty - you should see the chefs liberally throw in kosher salt. If you're a home cook, you would shudder: you would never put in that much. I think we live in an age of Kosher Salt Abuse. Kosher salt *is* salt, it's not a topping. Use it as you would use...SALT.

Aug 06, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan

How's the paella at Soccarat?

The paella isn't as good as the one I can make at home. I am very disappointed. I go to Valencia a lot and people in New York say that this is the place to eat paella. Well, they obviously have not really had the real thing in Spain. While Soccarat's is made in a real paella pan (well, sort of), and looks more authentic than the over-the-top risotto-style stuff they serve in America under the name "paella", it's too salty and the rice grains on top were undercooked while the bottom ones were not that burnt to form a decent crust. Quite unpleasant to eat, really. Paella in Valencia is often very very salty but it's oily/moist as well, this one was just dry. The waitress was very nice. The place was too loud (Mulberry St. location), you had to shout to make conversation. I would not go back.

Aug 06, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan

Where can I get fideua?

Thanks, El Rey de Fideua looks awesome! Someone said on Wordreference, when I Googled it:

"The main difference between catalan fideuĂ  and valencian fideuĂ  is that the catalan one uses very small and thin noddles, and the valencian one uses thick noodles."

Hm...

Mar 30, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan

Where can I get fideua?

To obsess further about fideua: is the authentic fideua in Spain made with short vermicelli-like egg noodle threads, or is it the narrow-gauge macaroni elbows?

At the Spain grocery store Despana (NYC), I bought something labelled FIDEUA, it was elbows (hollow). However, in Valencia, Spain, the fideua I had in restaurants were threads (not hollow). At El Quinto Pino, their fideua are threads.

I find that threads are tastier, but it's a matter of individual preference.

My current favorite kind of threads to use for fideua are the kind I found in Valencia supermarkets. Ironically, they are made in Alsace, France, and are known as cheveux d'anges, from a manufacturer called Valfleuri. They're short threads of vermicelli egg noodles. Nothing like "angel hair" or capellini.

Does anyone (say from Valencia, Gandia, or Catalonia) here know which is the more authentic pasta to use with fideua? Thank you!

-----
Despana
408 Broome St, New York, NY 10013

El Quinto Pino
401 W 24th St, New York, NY 10011

Mar 29, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan

Where can I get fideua?

Good news, you can now get decent fideua at EL QUINTO PINO in Manhattan. It's in Chelsea, 29th and 8th or 9th Ave, I think. Google it. It's truly tasty, very fish brothy, and comes with traditional garlic sauce. It's their best dish.

-----
El Quinto Pino
401 W 24th St, New York, NY 10011

Mar 29, 2011
AlexH1980 in Manhattan