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Dorothy Dean's Profile

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Help! Eastern European / Scandinavian near Queensboro Bridge?

Hi everyone--this is driving me crazy. There's a place in Manhattan near the entrance to the Queensboro Bridge, an old brick building I think, housing some kind of benevolent association or community center for people from an Eastern European country, or maybe a Scandinavian one. I want to say that it's Lithuanian. I've never eaten there but apparently they serve food... I want to say there's a restaurant in the basement?

I can't remember anything beyond that. Does this ring a bell with anyone? If I could get the name of the place I would be enormously grateful. Thank you!!!

Jan 27, 2012
Dorothy Dean in Manhattan

recommendation for yellow curry powder brand? (or recipe?)

Fantastic--thanks all!! I think I'll order and do a homemade batch and compare!

Sep 12, 2011
Dorothy Dean in General Topics

recommendation for yellow curry powder brand? (or recipe?)

Hi all,

I've been craving curried chicken salad--the kind everybody ate in the 80s with carrots and raisins, on a croissant.

But the yellow/Madras curry powder I bought (I forget the brand name but it's the most common kind, in the small rectangular canister) just tasted ancient, flat and stale--bought another canister, same thing.

Can anyone recommend their favorite brand?

I also have a cupboard full of Indian spices, if anyone has a recipe for a homemade version.

Thanks!!!

Sep 12, 2011
Dorothy Dean in General Topics

HOW DO YOU ORGANIZE YOUR COOKBOOK RECIPES ?

p.s. one important thing--if you want to search the "notes" fields, you have to select the advanced search option.

May 31, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

HOW DO YOU ORGANIZE YOUR COOKBOOK RECIPES ?

cool!! i'm generally not a have-it-together-person when it comes to organization, but this site helps a lot. have fun--happy to answer any questions!

May 31, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

HOW DO YOU ORGANIZE YOUR COOKBOOK RECIPES ?

when i find a recipe online, i copy and paste it into this online task manager, rememberthemilk.com, that i think is totally amazing (free, unless you sign up for the premium, which allows you access to customer service if you have a problem--that's 25/year). it's supposed to function as a to-do list but it works great for this.

this won't make complete sense until you actually go on the site and look around, but: i have separate lists for different categories, desserts, mains, baking, etc. i make the title of the recipe the task name, and copy the recipe itself into the notes field.

it's fully searchable--so, if i want to bake a cake i'll do a search for "cake"; if i have some leeks i want to use i'll do a search for "leeks," etc. similar to eatyourbooks, which i also use.

in the case of recipes for which i only have hard copies--i.e., clippings, which i keep in a binder, and cookbooks that aren't indexed on eatyourbooks--i index the most interesting ones on rememberthemilk, typing in the name of the recipe, source, and principal ingredients and seasonings. it only takes about twenty minutes to go through an average cookbook and index the ten or fifteen recipes you're most interested in.

not a perfect system but it usually allows me to track things down.

May 30, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What is the most essential cookbook for your favorite cuisine/s? Who is, say, the Marcella Hazan of Korea? Who's the Diana Kennedy of Lebanon?

I am so excited to try these--and by these I do mean all, though hopefully I'll be able to restrain myself from getting more than one at a time!!

May 27, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

Reheatable recipes for person with spinal cord injury, please help!

for fresh items, you might want to think about lightly pickled vegetables--you can make pickled vegetables once a week and they'll keep. and they have a bright, fresh quality.

giardinera could be good--here's a recipe i've been meaning to try, rave reviews:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/hot-ital...

i love mark bittman's sesame sauce, with cabbage for an asian slaw, and/or with edamame, cucumbers--whatever you like. it's great as a dressing for pasta salad. your client can stir it into pasta and eat it cold, with carrots, red peppers, or anything that appeals. the great thing about it is, it keeps for at least five days--it's really a light pickle, so it will preserve what you put it on.it's always a hit when i make it for people--just has that salty-sweet thing people love. maybe try making a cabbage-edamame slaw in individual portions.

for every pound (or less, depending on how much dressing you like) of vegetables, combine: 2 tblsp dark sesame oil, 1 tblsp peanut oil, 1 tblsp soy sauce, 1 tbslp sugar, 2 tsp rice vinegar, 1 minced clove garlic, and chile paste, sriracha, or other heat source to taste (try 1.5 tsp chile paste).

something else i really like--a relish or pickle that's very loosely inspired by the topping on a banh mi.
about three cups veg (carrot, cucumber, daikon, cabbage, etc.); juice of half lime or more, 4 tbsp rice vinegar; 2 tblsp sugar; ginger; lots of cilantro; lots of mint; good pinch salt, plenty of sriracha.

mix it all together and adjust seasoning--you want it assertive, lots of acid and heat. best after at least half hour--and if there's lots of excess liquid, you may want to drain it. this is yummy but you need some fat with it to balance it. oil can make it a vinaigrette; some mayo and chicken breast will make it a salad; etc.

May 26, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What is the most essential cookbook for your favorite cuisine/s? Who is, say, the Marcella Hazan of Korea? Who's the Diana Kennedy of Lebanon?

thanks allegra and buttertart! these all look amazing!

May 26, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What to cook with cast iron skillet in oven?

Cool--bon appetit!

May 26, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What is the most essential cookbook for your favorite cuisine/s? Who is, say, the Marcella Hazan of Korea? Who's the Diana Kennedy of Lebanon?

I am a cookbook addict and am trying to focus on buying the classic, authoritative, most-loved, most comprehensive books on particular cuisines.

I would guess there is probably a general consensus about Hazan and Kennedy for Italian and Mexican, for example, and probably Jaffrey for Indian (or Sahni?). But I'm wondering what the equivalents are for other cuisines.

What about, say, eastern Mediterranean, north African, west African, eastern European, Brazilian, Bahian, Peruvian, Korean, Portuguese, Japanese, Provencal... And lesser-known categories--Bulgaria? Cambodia?

Help me channel my addiction in a sane and productive way--thank you!

May 26, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What were your last three cookbook purchases...Part 2 [old]

i recommend supernatural every day--i just bought it. the only thing i've made from it is a dip with quince paste, lemon, olive oil, yogurt, and garlic, but it was well-balanced and yummy and the ingredient combination is so unexpected. that's what i like best about her recipes.

kale with coconut, pomegranate glazed eggplant with ricotta salata--not things i would have necessarily thought of on my own.

same thing with ottolenghi--not plenty, just ottolenghi--which i also just bought. flavor combinations that are completely new to me. haven't made anything from that yet, but really excited to.

May 26, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What to cook with cast iron skillet in oven?

easy, delicious farinata (aka socca):

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage...

i like it with zaatar, and a carrot-parsley-pomegranate molasses salad on the side

May 25, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

Bread making -- total beginner! Where do I start?

One thing that I think is absolutely crucial, so I am going to put it in caps even though I usually don't do that: GET A SCALE if you don't already have one. I use OXO's little one, about $35.

And do not start off with recipes that don't offer measures by weight. Part of the beauty of making bread is that it can be very intuitive, but intuition comes with practice--at the beginning, it really helps to have the precise measures that will help you get it right.

I am very, very, very strongly in agreement with those posters who recommended bread baker's apprentice, which has a beautifully lucid and thorough explanation of the whole process of making bread. Bakewise is great too, but if I had to pick i'd say apprentice.

May 22, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking
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What to do with curry leaves?

they can be sauteed (whole) for any soup, stew, or braise along with the other aromatics--use 5 to 10 depending on the quantity of the whole dish and how strong you want the flavor to be of course. of course they go well with any dish calling for indian spices but you can throw them into anything.

also, niloufer ichaporia king's book "my bombay kitchen" has some very intriguing recipes that call for curry leaves--in one, she just roasts wedges of squash rubbed with olive oil, garlic and chiles--scatter the leaves around the wedges before roasting. calls for a full cup of leaves for a 2-lb squash but you could sliver them and use fewer (or make less squash).

May 22, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What is the best sauce/condiment you've ever made?

sorry, yes--the ginger lime dipping sauce, page 34!

May 20, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking

What is the best sauce/condiment you've ever made?

I cannot recommend the ginger-lime sauce in Mai Pham's best of Vietnamese and Thai Cooking highly enough (most of the recipes in that book are great). It is absolutely perfectly balanced, extremely easy to make. the recipes intro blurb says that some of Pham's customers (she runs a restaurant) say it's "the best sauce they've ever tasted." it is presented as a dipping sauce but I like it as a marinade, stir-fry sauce, etc.

you can go to the amazon page and search in the book:
http://www.amazon.com/Best-Vietnamese...

May 19, 2011
Dorothy Dean in Home Cooking