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Mola Ram's Profile

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Why Chefs Sell Out

I also don't think the person who wrote this article did much selling out. However, I'm a little taken aback by some comments that seem to make no distinction between "levels of selling out." I mean, surely people can get upset about *legitimate* selling out, right? Or is it all just part of "growing up" as long as you get paid?

That may or may not be what anyone here actually believes, but it's a sentiment that I find to be very common among those who extoll the importance of "growing up." So many people categorize anything to do with idealism and creativity and art as "childish"--while regarding conformity to the system as the very definition of what it means to be a "real man." (Even when the system being conformed to is corrupt; even when just the least bit of resistance by a few people might change the system for the better). Such thinking is why so many problems in the world are able to continue unchallenged. I think people need to redefine for themselves what it means to be an "adult." Sometimes *not* bending with the wind and continuing to stick to your guns is what an adult does (or should do).

But seriously, come on. Can't we all agree that the Bayless thing is selling out? I'm not an expert on the man, but I always got the impression he has done well for himself. Was he really struggling to feed a new baby?

Mar 15, 2012
Mola Ram in Features

Unidentified floating objects in vinegar

Thanks. It's going down the drain. Yeah, unless someone here made a pretty convincing case that the floating specks were some awesome great thing, I was gonna be chucking it.

Feb 12, 2012
Mola Ram in General Topics

Unidentified floating objects in vinegar

I hate to bump up a really old thread, but I didn't know if I should start a knew one when this topic header perfectly suits my own question.

Just recently we looked at a bottle of balsamic vinegar we'd been using for a little while. It's "Bellino" brand from the supermarket, nothing fancy. And there are these very obvious little white specks floating on the top. They remind me of either yeast or tiny maggots. (No, they don't seem to move.)

I have read (though not quite understood) about the concept of "mothers" in vinegar, but people have described those as sort of gellatinous. The specks in our bottle are definitely not like a jellyfish. Just lots of little white particles on the top. Is this basically just mold formed from a cheap supermarket brand of balsamic? (I notice that the second ingredient is "concentrated grape must." Should we have been keeping this stuff in the fridge this whole time?) Should we toss this vinegar?

Feb 12, 2012
Mola Ram in General Topics

Lipton's Noodle Soup noodles, what kind are they?

Thanks for this response. I figured it was some special "non-normal" process like this. It occurred to me after I made my original post that the shapes in all the Lipton noodle packets are slightly different. (The one I was specifically craving was the one found in their now-defunct "Garden Vegetable" line which were relatively broad and flat; you could read a paper through them though.) But the one unifying factor in all these packets was you just add hot water and they were basically "cooked."

I guess I'll just reiterate the original request. Does anyone know of a line of noodles that have been pre-cooked (not necessary fried like Ramen) and dried again for the home cook?

Feb 09, 2012
Mola Ram in Home Cooking

Oven Gloves/Mitts -- ISO the ultimate

I know this thread is half a decade old, but since we recently ordered these gloves through this exact link, I just had to comment.

I can't speak for the rest of the omark line, but these particular gloves are a sham. They're as thin as can be. They're the kind of gloves you imagine the dancers would wear in some kind of Bob Fosse production of "Chicago." You can literally see your flesh peeking out between the holes in the fabric. As far as "heat resistance" goes, they are worse than a standard potholder. You'll be lucky to last the 3 or 4 seconds it might take to transfer a hot pan from the oven to the stovetop.

To be fair, I have not had the cajones to put one of these on and point a lit blowtorch at my hand like in the picture. But considering how poorly they protect against the heat of a metal tray that just came out of the toaster oven, I think I'd feel safer putting on an old sock and sticking my foot into a lawnmower.

It's been a while since I purchased something that was this fraudulently promoted.

Feb 01, 2012
Mola Ram in Cookware

Why Yelp Sucks!

I find it odd that you so casually take it as a given that alien life couldn't possibly exist, and then use that assumption to dismiss the Yelp complaints' validity.

Jan 30, 2012
Mola Ram in Food Media & News

Stop Bashing Paula Deen

"Last time I checked, cooking shows were entertainment."

You have very low standards for your entertainment.

Jan 20, 2012
Mola Ram in Features

Lipton's Noodle Soup noodles, what kind are they?

Thanks for the responses, you guys. I will definitely check out Goodman's and fideos. If I hit paydirt I'll let people know, just on the slim chance there are any other weirdos out there who also fetishize Lipton's noodles.

Mar 23, 2011
Mola Ram in Home Cooking

Lipton's Noodle Soup noodles, what kind are they?

Thanks for the response. Yes, I have tried the PennDutch "fine" egg noodles. While they are definitely closer in size to the Lipton's, they still don't have the same texture.

If I could describe the texture issue a bit more, it's almost like the Penn 'Dutch noodles (all sizes) are a little "too hearty." I mean, they're probably what most people would want in an egg noodle--honest and straightforward. However, I find that the noodles in Lipton's almost have a "sleazier" texture. They're not as "wheaty" as the Pennsylvania Dutch ones. I get the feeling that Lipton's are less healthy somehow. Again, I think it's possible that they have gone through a pre-frying process similar to what I have read that Ramen noodles go through. (But again, when I eat those very long stringy Ramen noodles in those brick packages, they seem way more rubbery than what I'm after. Maybe if they used that exact same noodle but shaped it into small paper-flat noodles, then I'd recognize the texture as Lipton's, but that's just pure speculation.)

Mar 23, 2011
Mola Ram in Home Cooking

Lipton's Noodle Soup noodles, what kind are they?

I have used both the traditional Pennsylvania Dutch wide noodles, but also the thinner ones. The thinner ones are closer in "shape" to the Lipton noodles, but the texture is the same "plain" (and kind of blubbery) texture as the wider PennDutch noodles, which is kind of what I wanted to get away from. Honestly, I think what I like best about the Lipton's noodles is that they are very thin (practically two-dimensional), and the texture. I do think it's possible that the texture is due to the type of "pre-frying" that Ramen type noodles go through. However, the noodles in traditional Ramen blocks aren't what I'm looking for either--maybe if they weren't in long roundish strands and closer to flat noodles, they might be closer to what I'm looking for, I don't know.

Thank you for the Goodman's suggestion. I will check out their egg pasta to add to my homemade stock.

Mar 23, 2011
Mola Ram in Home Cooking

Lipton's Noodle Soup noodles, what kind are they?

Okay, so I had some of my slave chlidren do some Google searching and they still haven't been able to uncover this mystery. (It would probably help if I taught them to read and write, but there just aren't enough hours in the day.) Honestly, this is even harder to unearth than the lost Sankara stones.

Anyway, I've made a few attempts at making homemade chicken noodle soup. I've got the homemade stock part down just fine. However, I'm still never pleased with the soup I end up with. Why? Because the traditional Pennsylvania Dutch style egg noodles from the grocery store just don't do it for me. I don't like their sort of blubbery non-descript texture.

What is my ideal chicken noodle soup noodle? If you can't already tell from the message topic, it's the noodles in Lipton's instant noodle soup packets. Yes, they're way to small--ideally I would like somehing a bit longer and wider--but overall, I really like the texture. I'm talking about noodles as found in their Spring Vegetable product. (I remember once many years ago, they also had a product called "Garden Vegetable." The broth was less overtly beefy/tomato, and the noodles were wider. Those noodles also had a great texture; very flat.)

I checked out a few web pages listing all kinds of different Asian noodles (some made from things besides flour, some pre-fried) and while some of them sound like they *may* be similar, I can't really be sure.

Is there anyone here "in the know" about what exact kind of noodles Lipton's uses for their soup mixes? Are such noodles available to buy or order anywhere?

Thank you very much in advance. Also, praise Kali.

Mar 23, 2011
Mola Ram in Home Cooking