monkeyrotica's Profile

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It's a No-Go-To Joe's (Crabshack) for me !!!

Looks like Joes is revamping their menu to include less ammonia and more trans fat.

http://nrn.com/food-trends/menumasters-2014-joes-crab-shack

http://www.chicagotribune.com/busines...

about 2 hours ago
monkeyrotica in Chains

Mission BBQ - Glen Burnie

Yeah, I had a similar experience. Definitely waiting a while until the reviews roll in.

about 5 hours ago
monkeyrotica in Washington DC & Baltimore

Whole Foods parking hell

Ha! This is one of the reasons I stopped going to Whole Foods. Their garages are a nightmare of entitled people who either (a) have no idea how to park, (b) have serious anger management issues, (c) drive a tank that they can't see out of or (d) all of the above. The Trader Joes in Old Town has a garage and I never use it. I'd rather park a block away and walk than deal with these idiots. The only grocery garage I've never had a problem in is the Harris Teeter near Potomac Avenue and it's probably because I go during lunch and there's no crowds.

about 6 hours ago
monkeyrotica in Washington DC & Baltimore

What discontinued products do you miss?

I like them because they're not sickly sweet, which is why I've pretty much given up on sodas. Had a bad incident at a fountain machine where I tried to get lemonade and got Sprite instead. It tasted like carbonated Karo Syrup.

about 10 hours ago
monkeyrotica in General Topics

Update on Wegmans near Ft. Belvoir

I've been doing that for the past 6 months and I've pretty much given up.

1 day ago
monkeyrotica in Washington DC & Baltimore

[Korean in DC] Japchae hoddeok in Washington DC?

Your Korean options in DC are limited. Mandu (which I never cared for) and diner-ey type places like New Youngs or Cafe Kimchi. I don't recall seeing hoddeok in any of those places. Your best bet is either some place in Annandale or Beltsville.

1 day ago
monkeyrotica in Washington DC & Baltimore

Update on Wegmans near Ft. Belvoir

I'm wondering if this is some sorta trend with new grocers. G Mart was supposed to open a while ago, and it's still closed. Here's a "coming soon" article from over a year ago.

http://mountvernon.patch.com/groups/b...

1 day ago
monkeyrotica in Washington DC & Baltimore

Cheap chain pizza - anything good?

7-11 sells a $5.55 pepperoni that looks like the same thing Little Caesars is selling. I'm tempted to see what I'll get for that extra 55 cents. I'm guessing diarrhea.

1 day ago
monkeyrotica in Chains
1

What discontinued products do you miss?

Pellegrino makes a grapefruit soda called Pompelmo. Basically just grapefruit and seltzer, but at least it doesn't have that nasty Fresca Aspartame aftertaste.

http://www.sanpellegrinofruitbeverage...

1 day ago
monkeyrotica in General Topics

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

What's at issue is who is using the term "authentic" and why, as well as the belief that "traditional" dishes exist as some unchanging, idealized concept. ALL cuisine is "fusion cuisine." One culture conquers/invades/emigrates to  another, bringing along those "comfort foods" which are then imposed/accepted/incorporated by the locals using familiar ingredients. Chinese udon soups were brought to Japan in the 9th Century. Japan adapted those techniques to local tastes to the point where "authentic Chinese noodle soup" in Japan is extinct. It is now a fusion of contemporary Chinese noodle techniques and Japanese aesthetics as well as other global influences. Similarly, Korean noodle soup evolved during the Mongol invasions and changed again during the Japanese occupation, when soldiers brought THEIR style of udon from Japan. An influx of Korean workers into Japan prior to WWII brought THEIR style of spicier udon to Koreatowns in Japan, which became an attraction for locals who wanted "authentic Korean noodles."  Again during the Korean War, Korean noodles became fused with instant ramen, Spam, hotdogs, and (of course) kimchi into "Korean Army base soup."  Which of these dishes is "authentic" "traditional" Korean noodles? 

Apr 12, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

I don't think "acquiring knowledge" ever ends. At least I hope so. We've all been the ignorant ones at some point, so I'm more than happy to let the "non-authentic" proclamations slide. That is, until I read about some foodie millennial writing a memoir.

Apr 11, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

What is your oldest cookbook?

Do you mean the cookbook itself or the recipes in it? I've got a copy of Archestratos cookbook, but the oldest printed cookbook is a 1900 copy of Mrs. Beetons.

Apr 11, 2014
monkeyrotica in Not About Food

Arby's, just how is their roast beef made?

I was stuck near an Arby's and decided to give their reuben sandwich a try. It was surprisingly tasty. Would definitely order again.

http://www.brandeating.com/2013/03/re...

Apr 10, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

Agreed. I put this in the same semiotic category as putting Kung Pao Shrimp on a bun and topping it with pickled cucumber salad and fried rice noodles and calling it "a burger." At some point, cassoulet needs beans and a burger needs some kind of patty. It can be beef or turkey or soy or even ground shrimp. But I don't think there's any riches left to be mined in that "burger or sandwich" vein.

Apr 10, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

To me, the quote addresses a bourgeois attitude towards dining as identity. The food people eat makes a statement about who they want to be seen as. Again, it's food as communication: on its most basic terms, eating expensive/rare foods is meant to convey exclusivity. I can afford this and those people over there can't. "Authenticity" in this context is just another branding issue: rarity of ingredients, exclusivity of restaurant, notoriety of the chef, etc. By saying this D.O.C. Neapolitan pizza place is more "authentic" than that one on the other side of town, you are stating (a) you are educated enough to know the difference and (b) you're tastes are discerning enough to distinguish between this style of pizza and the slop they serve at Guido's Pie Hole on Bleeker. Whether either of those pies is any good is a subjective aesthetic judgement.

Apr 09, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

Those interests aren't mutually exclusive. Restaurants trying to deliver "perfection" regardless of bottom line don't last very long. I've lost track of all the "high concept" eateries that fold after 18 months (or less). I just rewatched "Big Night" recently. No doubt the food was perfect. They still went out of business. Like when Secondo tries to convince Primo to drop the risotto because it's so expensive and takes so long and people don't like it anyway. So he says maybe he should start selling hotdogs instead.

Apr 09, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

Best Bagged Tea Brands?

For loose teas, I bought a ceramic mug with a removable infuser. World Market has them pretty cheap.

Apr 09, 2014
monkeyrotica in General Topics

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

You have this attitude particularly among BBQ fetishists. These techniques are authentic and those aren't, even outside the regional meat/fuel variances. I say if you want authentic, you need to dig a trench, line it with rocks, burn a bunch of logs, then lay green wood branches over the hot coals, put your meat on those branches, and sit by the smoldering trench overnight because that's how slaves did it in the Antebellum South. (There's a guy who actually does this.) Or if you want super most authentic bbq, build a pimento wood platform three feet off the ground in Barbados and smoke fish, iguana, and whatever else you can find while wearing a palm frond bikini like they were doing when Columbus arrived. But there's a reason why we use drum smokers and briquettes and remote thermometers and the "Texas crutch." Innovation. It's not always a bad word.

http://www.tmbbq.com/the-antebellum-c...

Apr 09, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News
1

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

Japanese Foodways Past and Present by Eric C. Rath. A collection of heavily footnoted essays on the evolution of Japanese cuisine.

http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Foodwa...

Also highly recommend Modern Japanese Cuisine: Food, Power and National Identity by Katarzyna J. Cwiertka. A little more accessible than the former, but still a good read. Really interesting passages on the influences of Western culture after the Meiji Restoration, particularly the influence of British cuisine (currys and canned beef) and the evolution of restaurant culture.

Apr 09, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

Food Franchises That Don't Suck

I've had two, both horrible.

Worse? Great American Steak & Buffet. It's like the stuff that didn't meet OCB's already dismal standards, these guys bought in bulk, cooked all to hell, and drowned in salt.

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

Yeah, there's definitely a mindset that "authentic" pizza or ramen or bbq exists like a mosquito sealed in amber and everything else is puke. I find it interesting that cooks who have been around for the long haul, like Jacques Pepin or Julia Child, weren't nearly as obsessed with perceived authenticity as they were with what tastes good and what fresh ingredients you have ready access to. Pepin's "instant" cassoulet tastes as good as any super-most-authentic cassoulets I've had, and I've had plenty.

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

I think "authentic" is a subset of "traditional." It depends on what/whose traditions we're talking about and at what time. Look at musical traditions. Take authentic music from any region--Africa or Brazil or China--and you can find traditional styles of music and each style can be authentic or not, but none exist in a vaccuum. African tribal rhythms were carried by slaves to the Carribbean, then to the South where they evolved into ragtime and dixieland and jazz and blues. Those traditions were discovered and exported to England where musicians adapted those styles and brought them back to Africa as Western pop music where musicians re-incorporated them into their traditional styles of music. And food tastes and styles evolve in the same way, cross pollinated with other traditions to create new ones which is what makes "inauthentic" and "nontraditional" foods interesting. Whether it's better or worse is entirely subjective.

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

I liked the part of the article where he said said authenticity had replaced sincerity in restaurants. And definitely agree with his point about cooking as communication. Reading a book about formal dining in Japan during the Edo period. Meals were constructed and arranged like haikus: dishes designed to resemble a woman's hand in a kimono or a mountain range or clouds in the sky. And the names of the foods were sometimes elaborate puns. And some formal dishes were assembled and not even meant to be eaten, but only admired, and there was a whole etiquette around how you were supposed to compliment the host on how beautiful the food was. The whole process was about communicating and reinforcing a class structure and heirarchy. And the wealthiest hosts would try and outdo eachother by using the most exotic and expensive ingredients. Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

Forgotten Fast Foods

Who is Eddie Leonard and why are his sandwiches so tasty? (complete with jingle)

http://www.thejoyboys.com/eleonard.htm

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains

Forgotten Fast Foods

There's still one on Georgia Avenue. Also in Suitland, but I have no idea if they still do subs. The one in Waldorf still does. I may have to check them out.

http://s3-media3.ak.yelpcdn.com/bphoto/Ck5Lwot4_re93G2OlEtVyw/l.jpg

http://www.ywbddelivery.com/upload/Ed...

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains

“Authenticity,” he confided to me, “is a bourgeois value posing as an aesthetic one.”

http://www.salon.com/2014/04/07/the_k...

Interesting article on Korean chefs and evolving food culture. I dug up some old recipes for cassoulet and, since I can't eat duck, I tried to find one without confit. Turns out there are lots of cassoulet recipes from the south of France that use lamb or pork or whatever and have no duck at all. Yet the version with confit seems to have been deemed the "most authentic." Kimchi wouldn't exist without chilis from South America. Cajun cuisine wouldn't exist without Acadian techniques and Carribbean spices and cooks whose descendents came from Africa. Is kimchi on a taco less "authentic" than giardiniera or slaw or the iceberg lettuce at Taco Bell? These foods evolved over time and will continue to do so or as people adapt them to their particular tastes, authenticity be damned.

Apr 08, 2014
monkeyrotica in Food Media & News

It's a No-Go-To Joe's (Crabshack) for me !!!

Not true! The flavors of iodine and ammonia definitely overpowered the freezer burn in my Big Bubba Bukkit O Frozen "Seafood Style Calamari" Pork Rectii.

Apr 07, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains
3

Forgotten Fast Foods

Gino's is making a comeback. Or trying to, at least.

http://www.ginosgiant.com/

Apr 07, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains

Forgotten Fast Foods

Eddie's is still serving fine SEAFOODSUBSPIZZACHICKENCHINESEFOOD.

Apr 07, 2014
monkeyrotica in Chains

Childhood memories

That's it.

Apr 04, 2014
monkeyrotica in Washington DC & Baltimore