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Dry-aging beef at home - ISO of specifics please for 28 days

Ideally, you would want some air circulation and a block of salt to inhibit unwanted bacteria. A small fan like the ones used on computers would be perfect, or a battery operated convection fan used for ovens could be used, but the you would probably have to change the batteries over the course of a month.

You should place the meat directly on the rack, no sheet pan.....no seasonings either. At the end of the month, trim the dried surface and fat away....save for a stock. Slice away for steaks, and use a food saver if possible.

I would also invest in a thermometer to make sure the fridge maintains <38*.

I'm no expert, but that's what I would do. Hopefully Tom34 or acgold7 will jump in. For the record, I find for the home, 28 days wet aged in Cryovac produces some mighty fine results for tenderness...but you won't get that nutty taste dry aging will develop.

about 8 hours ago
fourunder in Home Cooking

boneless top sirloin steak

Something for you to consider next time.....Reverse Sear.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/866603

about 19 hours ago
fourunder in Home Cooking

First Time Roasting Pork Shoulder Picnic

You know what....you recorded the progress and now you know which temperature you prefer. The 6-7 hour mark was probably the right choice...For my tastes, going over 180 is too much unless you are going to dress it with oil or sauce...As for those who say the connective tissue needs to go higher, I would disagree. It's sufficiently melted above 170 and under 180 to be enjoyable....and like you have found out, above 180-190 it can become dry.

I rarely use a thermometer for Picnic Shoulder Roast. In your first and second pictures of the roast, you can see how the meat has shrunk from the ends of the bones. This is when I know the meat is done and you can do a simple pull or tug on the meat to see if it comes off. If so, it's done..

Thanks for sharing.

Apr 20, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

What's the best turkey to buy?

Sorry for the very, very late response, but I did not see this until just now as this thread was revived.

I don't do much other than a very liberal Kosher Salt and Fresh Cracked Black Pepper sprinkle and rub. both inside the cavity and on the skin...usually for about 48 hours uncovered in the refrigerator. I've done the butter under the skin and fresh herbs...but everyone likes it simple now.. Once in a while I'll use one of those Salt/Garlic mixtures you purchase in the prefilled grinders. Nothing more fancy than that.

Apr 20, 2014
fourunder in General Topics

First Time Roasting Pork Shoulder Picnic

In this specific case, I would remove the roast for 10 minutes just to ensure the roast stops cooking....if it were a larger full shoulder, then I would just turn the thermostat down and leave the roast in.

The scalding is a Cantonese Chinese method. Many Latin recipes will boil the entire roast for up to 30 minutes.. I prefer the Chinese method.

Apr 19, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Two Turkeys- Cooking Time?

Two turkeys will take longer to cook, and the convection feature will reduce the time....they may offset each other, but without specif details given, it's not possible to give a proper estimation of time.

Apr 19, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

First Time Roasting Pork Shoulder Picnic

Your estimation on time is sound. With unknown variables to consider, it could hit temperature sooner or later, but since you don't have any time constraints, you don't have to worry about that hurdle. Giving yourself a minimum 60 minutes per pound will extend to about 5 hours if your roast doesn't hit the stall phase, but expect it to do so. At this point you can cover with foil or not. I simply wait it out for the roast to hit temperature My target would be 170 before the carryover. The closer you get to 190, the meat will start to shred and bot be has slice able... I recommend you hold for a minimum 60 minutes, but two won't hurt and can only improve. I hold inside the oven at 140, but since your lowest setting is 170, it will be fine as well. Take the roast out of the oven for 10 minutes, then put it back in. Once you have removed the roast and dropped the thermostat to 170, effectively the roast has stopped cooking and the temperature cannot increase after the carryover effect has been completed. With a thermostat setting of 225, the carryover will be 5-7 degree, not 10 from my experience. 10-15* happens with higher roasting temperatures.

If you want to enjoy the skin crispy, consider pricking and scalding the skin with a couple of teapots of boiling water. It softens the skin first so you don't get a rock hard skin...just crispy.

In general:

* remove from fridge 2 hours before placing inoven

* 6* hours in the oven

* 1-2 hour hold.

* you can put the roast in in the morning and have it for dinner....or you can put it in the oven before you retire for bed and have it for lunch. Either way, you can have a little more margin for error(overcooking), if you roast at 210-215, which would give you an additional hour or two.

Here's a thread I started on Porchetta with pictures. towards the bottom is a 7 pound roast similar to your for comparison purposes so you can see what to expect. You should read the whole thread so you can know the expectations for rolled roasts and boneless roasts as well.

If you need any further advice or clarification, just ask and good luck.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8871...

Apr 19, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

How do Steak Houses get away with it?

Yes, I caught that, thank you. I purchased a couple myself...and a couple Leg of Lambs...one which I will Wet Age a minimum 30 days in the Cryovac.

Apr 18, 2014
fourunder in General Topics

Bone in Leg of Lamb - First time here...

The debate on whether it's necessary to brown or sear any roast before slow roasting for me comes by advice given to me from someone here in the past where he directed me to the National Beef Council's advisory position is the step is necessary to kill off any bacteria on the SURFACE of the roast...this is especially important when you use a digital probe thermometer, as you should not insert it before the meat is browned or seared.

I generally brown in the oven at 450 for 15-20 minutes. It save the cleanup of a frypan and the stove top. Searing on the stove top can also form a gray outer ring on the roast if you brown a little too long. With a straight brown in the oven and slow roasting, you will not get any outer gray outer ring. with a straight slow roast from the start, I find the surface meat takes on a texture of jerky, so I have long since stopped browning only at the end.

Unless you need the oven for other items, I suggest leaving the roast in the oven after primary cooking. Again, it just saves steps and clean up without adding the cost of using aluminum foil. the oven is already a controlled environment. If your oven does not have any warm settings from 140-170, then you could simply set at 200 and crack the oven door open.

Most recommendation suggest resting meat for 15-30 minutes before slicing. this allows the hot meat juices to redistribute throughout the roast. The longer you can rest, or HOLD, then the meat continues to tenderize naturally and the juice will stay in the cell of the muscle fibers and not exude out onto your cutting board when sliced..

If you need the oven for sides, you can remove the oven for the second hour, or time necessary to heat your sides. You can simply tent with foil...but I use a large stainless steel bowl over the roast and cover it with large towels to insulate. Before serving, you can crank the oven up to 450+ or broil and give the roast a high heat blast for 5-10 minutes to bring the roast back up to a more pleasant serving temperature. 450 allows you to put some nice color onto the roast, while broiling will give you a better charred crust, but you must watch over the broil step. I don't use the broil option because it forms a gray outer ring on the roast, which is what I try to avoid when roasting meat low and slow.

As for the lemongrass and ginger...I would just smash a few for easy removal on the inside and fine chop for the outer surface in the marinade if your concern is they will be unpleasant.... I don't think ginger or lemongrass will be too unpleasant if you fine chop or pulse/pulverize in a food processor or mortar & pestle, With the mortar & pestle, you can remove the fibers that don't crush.

Apr 18, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Boston Butt / Pork Roast , Roasted Low and Slow @ 200* for 8.5 Hours ( Pictures )

The problem I see is that if you decide to roast as is, the bone is going to hamper the the cooking time and final result. the meat near the bone will not cook evenly and will be pink or bloody while most of the other meat is cooked through. The bone itself does not improve the roast in this instance., as there is not much meat around it.

If you were to remove the meat from the bone, @ 250*, it would probably reach 155 in 90-120 minutes, or even as soon as 60 minutes.. My general formula for estimation of time is about 50 minutes per pound for larger roasts. Allowing for unknown variables. 2 hours cooking time and 1 hour rest gives you a minimum 3 hours. If the roast hits your target sooner than expected, just hold it longer. I always try to hold my roasts for a minimum 2 hours, as I believe the longer resting time aids in tenderizing the meat....whether it is pork, beef, veal or turkey.

If you do go along with my suggestion to remove the meat from the bone....both will cook more evenly and more quickly. You can gnaw on the roasted bone....or save it for a soup or Sunday Gravy.

Apr 17, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Boston Butt / Pork Roast , Roasted Low and Slow @ 200* for 8.5 Hours ( Pictures )

Is it a roast, or a steak? 1.5 seems too small to be a roast with a bone. How thick is the meat?

Apr 17, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Quick place for lunch near the Garden State Parkway or TPke in northern NJ?

You may get better recommendations if you are more specific with your travel route, i.e., are you coming over the Tappan Zee or George Washington Bridge

I'm not knocking the recommendations, but if you Take the GSP to Paramus, then back up rout 17N to Mahwah, that's the long route when it's probably shorter and easier to stay on 287 to Route 17 to get to Mahwah

Also, do you plan to dine in or carryout?

Apr 17, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

Bone in Leg of Lamb - First time here...

That's lamb from Australia purchased at Costco. The price you mention, may or may not be for North American Lamb.... or the same New Zealand/Australian lamb.

FYI.....Bone-In Leg of Lamb is on sale for 3.49-3.99 this week here in NJ.

Apr 17, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Bone in Leg of Lamb - First time here...

Good evening, Thanks for the kind words and I hope I didn't miss your dinner tonight....but suspect your are requesting this information for the weekend.

With regards to #1....Yes, I have marinated overnight, not it's not needed....and if doing so, I uses some type of herb , or combination of herbs, with olive oil and fresh lemon....Kosher or Sea Salt and Fresh Cracked Pepper. I'm not a fan of making slits in the meat and inserting garlic. With low and slow roasting, the garlic stays raw and I find it unpleasant on many levels. If using garlic, I'd rather make a paste of r0asted garlic with herbs. In general, when using acid, I would not marinate more than 12 hours, as find the texture of the meat tends to get compromised and mushy soft.

.With regards to #2....You have not mentioned what your desired meat temperature is...but I'll assume you are shooting for something pink and not well done. Both can be achieved using the low and slow method, but it would probably take double the time using at least 250*. Depending on time available, I always prefer to roast at 210-225*, as I find it provides very consistent results. For a Leg of Lamb, I would estimate 3.5 hours cooking time and 2 hours holding time at 140*.

As for how I would prepare:

Bone-In....I would coat the outside and start with a high heat browning phase of 15-20 minutes before dropping down to to the selected thermostat setting.

Boneless...(which I would suggest)...I would coat the meat liberally...remove from the fridge and roll and tie the roast. For a small roast, I would pan sear to brown. For a full leg rolled roast, it's easier to brown in the oven, just like the Prime Rib Roast. i always roast on a rack or grill grate over a sheet or hotel pan.

Here's how I've done it in the past.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/929260

If you need any more help, just ask.

Apr 17, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Steamship of Pork...a.k.a, Fresh Ham - - Slow Roasted @ 210* for 12 hours, with Pictures.

Hello. In general, I find electric ovens to be pretty accurate and reliable, but an individual oven, like yours certainly could have calibration issues and vary. Many will tout the importance of a Digital Probe thermometer, which I do recommend you should have...but I would argue that an oven thermometer to check the accuracy of the thermostat is much more important. The ovens used in many commercial kitchens to slow roast are in fact Electric Ovens.

The temperature you use should be 190-250*. For the roast above, I used 200-210 and it hit 155* in 12 hours...which extends to about 45 minutes per pound. For estimation purposes, I would suggest you use 50-60 minutes, as there will be unknown variables with your roast's size and shape. I recommend a minimum two hour rest as well, plus a couple of hours outside the fridge to warm closer to room temperature..

The beauty of the slow roast is you can put the roast in the oven the night before and it will be ready the next morning or early afternoon. If it hits temperature sooner than expected, you can hold it easily for 4 hours. I do so inside the oven @ 140-170*, usually for a minimum 2 hours. Just before slicing and serving I give it a 450 blast just to bring it to a pleasant serving temperature.

If you come back with specifics on your actual roast, and the time you wish to serve dinner at, I would be happy to fine tune your timeline....as I would roast it. As for 200, 225 or 250...the lower you go, the higher the yield of meat will be. This could easily be a difference of one pound from low to high. My feelings are if I can wait 8-10 hours...I can wait 10-12 as well...I have the patience and it's usually in the oven while I'm sleeping for most of the time anyway.

Apr 16, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

All this Gordon Ramsey and KN talk, let's watch him harvest Caviar !!

Very Cool....

Back in 88 while working for a country club...we were fortune enough to have a Kilo of Beluga at the expense of a wedding party client. We made omelets the next morning after the party. We figured each omelet costs $600.

Gotta admit, I like Caviar ....and Smoked Sturgeon too.

Apr 15, 2014
fourunder in Food Media & News

Chinese Sausage

Can I steam them or boil them in spite of the recommended use?
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Lop Cheong can be eaten any way you see fit...there are no rules....only they are best when steamed while making rice. You can keep them whole or sliced. the advantage of cooking in rice...it flavors the rice at the same time...and makes for better fried rice or rice porridge the second time around.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/866022

Apr 13, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
1

Bone in Leg of Lamb - First time here...

Here's a recent Bone-In Leg of Lamb with pictures.....where i Wet-Aged 30 days and high.y recommend it.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/824994#8559998

Another more recent experiment slow roasting one and roasting another Greek Style at a higher temperature.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/889450#8549357

I would suggest you read <fldhkybnva'S> thread where she achieved excellent results and similar to what you are attempting to achieve and conquer.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/889450#

Apr 12, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
1

Pinto's in Hackensack

Who can't remember that red neon sign with a Chicken running in parts from fresh to cooked to the basket....Holly's was a diner at the Route 4 East & Hackensack Avenue intersection across from what is now, Riverside Square Mall/Bloomingdale's, and today is the Coach House Diner. Jahn's was on the other side heading on Route 4 West in Fair Lawn, just before where Route 4W and Route 208N split, and today is where The River Palm Terrace resides.

Both Jahn's and Holly's had their versions of the Kitchen Sink.. 20+ scoops of ice cream with toppings...Jahn's was served in a bowl and Holly's in a vase. Holly's was also known for their Coca Cola with mill added.

Apr 12, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

Neat sandwiches?

Regardless of the type of bread used....a thin coating, or layer of mayonnaise, mustard or cheese spread...will inhibit any other type of liquid, e.g., meat juices, oil & vinegar...from penetrating the bread or roll. to prohibit the bread from falling apart too easily.

Apr 12, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
2

Corned Beef in the oven @ 215* for 8 hours....Very Tender

Still sounds very delicious to me...I find every roast is a little bit of a challenge to see the results....some are better than others, but nothing has ever been terrible.

Like yourself, I made some after St Paddy's Day purhcases of the Point Cut myself. Reddi-Gourmet branad at the local supermarket for $1.98/lb. I picked up the smaller ones at approximately 3 pounds....any larger and I eat too much.

My plan was to cook 3 separate Corned Beefs. One a straight stove-top briaise and two partially braised, then one covered with Pickling and extra Peppercorns fresh grinded and applied to the top, and the other glazed with a spice mixture, brown sugar and mustard.

1. Stove top Braised CB for 4 hours.....very tender

2. Stove top braised for 90 minutes, then 4 hours in the oven at 225* on a rack, held for 2+ hours...nice and tender, but slightly firmer in texture than a straight braise. Also a little saltier than the straight braise.

3. Same stove top braise for 90 minutes, then glazed, also on a rack, additional glaze applied every hour. the same 225* for 4 hours and held for 2+ hours. Sweet and slightly salty, the same texture as the other

All three sliced thinly and very easily. No shredding.

Apr 09, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Pinto's in Hackensack

Nice blast from the past.....

Apr 08, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey
1

Reservation Confirmation.

Bagelman....really, your time may be worth 400+ to someone who calls you for your time and advice....but not to anyone, or business, who you call, unless they are your client, discussing their case.

Apr 05, 2014
fourunder in Not About Food
4

Eating pizza or burger w/ knife and fork

Seems to me a little pretentious to eat pizza with a knife and fork.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
and it seems to me....pretentious to comment on how, or how others....eat pizza, a burger or anything else.

Apr 05, 2014
fourunder in Not About Food
4

Firebird's Wood Fired Grill at the Monmouth Mall Eatontown, NJ

Me thinks the bartender hates his job and resents those who look to take advantage of happy hour pricing....thus reducing his check average and tip.

Too much salt on a pretzel....now you're the one who expects too much...it's their version of a soft pretzel.

Apr 05, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

Joyce Chinese Cuisine.....River Edge, New Jersey.....Opening April 16th.

Just passed this place today and noticed the new signage, so I made a stop to see what information I could find out about it. Two ladies were inside and were kind enough to stop what they were doing to open the door, say hello and answer my short queries... No menu available yet until next week, but the planned opening date is set for April 16th barring any complications. The place is very pleasant inside with wood decorations, tile floor and attractive (Yellow or Ivory) Leather Chairs.

The restaurant will feature Sichuan and Hong Kong Style food/dishes.

Joyce Chinese Cuisine
474-478 Kinderkamack Road
River Edge , NJ

Apr 05, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

How to make pork spareribs in oven

They are many ways to bake ribs....I prefer to roast low and slow on a rack @ 225 for about 4 hours myself...many commercial kitchen incorporate steam to ensure a *fall off the bone* result. It can be by wrapping in foil individually, or by placing them on/with a rack covered in a roasting pan covered with foil. This will make ribs tender in about 2 hours.. You can remove the foil and lather with sauce several times to finish in the oven at 350*+, or under the broiler...or you can simply add dry rub and finish in a similar fashion.

Apr 05, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
1

Roots in Morristown and the instructions from the waiter

This actually becoming more common in higher end steak houses. While it doesn't bother me, I really don't understand the logic behind. it.You state that you received a clunker. That would leave a more serious impression on me rather than a slight temperature difference. If I'm paying $50, I would be more apt to send it back than a steak at Arthur's or Alexus for $25.

I would tell the waiter, it may be cooked to my liking...but that doesn't mean I'm going to like.it.....and if not, I'm going to take my two chews to make sure you don't bring me back the same one....

Apr 03, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

Chick-fil-A kickin' the Colonels butt

The Blue Laws are alive and well here in Bergen County...but Teaneck doesn't enforce them.

Apr 02, 2014
fourunder in Chains

Pig Roast Morris County

Green Village is a quality purveyor, but I have not been to any events they have catered. I would doubt any of the mentioned caterers would actually roast the pig on sight. Even when I went to Hawaii the pigs were [re roasted for the Luau. You certainly could hire another chef, but cutting and portioning the pig is actually quite easy. You remove the Crispy skin and make vertical cuts. I'm sure there's a YouTube video to show you how..

Go sample the pig, you won't be disappointed.

Apr 02, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey