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Slow Roasting Turkey Times... Spatchcocked, Boned & Tied Roll/Porchetta and Single Breast... with Pictures.

Very nice....great pics, especially the second one with the Breast on the cutting board. Even though the skin shrunk, you can clearly see the meat did not dry out. This is why low and slow works best..

about 8 hours ago
fourunder in Home Cooking

hmm...first turkey, I guess a roasting pan would be helpful

sorry for the late response, but six hours is not uncommon, however it really depends on the temperature you roast at. The great thing about planning an early finish with the long hold....you give yourself leeway for the problems that arise unexpectedly, like the longer roasting time to reach temperature.

I always prefer to choose my turkeys weigh in under 14 pounds for more even and quicker roasting.

1 day ago
fourunder in Cookware

hmm...first turkey, I guess a roasting pan would be helpful

If the bird is out of any drafts, it will be sufficiently hot enough to serve....Just make sure the gravy is hot.

No need to warm up at 250

1 day ago
fourunder in Cookware

hmm...first turkey, I guess a roasting pan would be helpful

Very nice...hold it in your oven @ 140-or whatever the lowest thermostat setting your oven can keep. Take it out when you do your sides....crank up the oven and give it a final heat blast to crisp the skin.

For the record, I've held turkeys for 4 hours on occasion without any problems.

1 day ago
fourunder in Cookware

Slow Roasting Turkey Times... Spatchcocked, Boned & Tied Roll/Porchetta and Single Breast... with Pictures.

Never use Convection with primary roasting, regardless of temperature used. Use it only for the high heat blast to crisp the skin.

2 days ago
fourunder in Home Cooking

100 Steps Supper Club- Bizarre Experience

Under the circumstances you describe, I would not have posted. Instead, I would have gone back and asked them to go lightly on the salt.

Nov 26, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

Slow Roasting Turkey Times... Spatchcocked, Boned & Tied Roll/Porchetta and Single Breast... with Pictures.

I use either a half sheet pan or hotel pan(chafing dish)...but you can use any pan that fits in the oven. You don't want to use anything with more than a 2 inch side.

Nov 26, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Dry-aging beef at home - ISO of specifics please for 28 days

No moisture loss at all. If I recall correctly, the following was done with a ONE inch steak. You can see the results in pictures before, after and sliced. If memory serves me, I concluded a thicker steak would be better if you wanted more char...with minor adjustments to temperature. You could use 225-275. 225 doubles the time to reach 90-95.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/866603

Nov 25, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Dry-aging beef at home - ISO of specifics please for 28 days

What you say is true, however, I would opine the often touted Cast Iron Pan method can easily over-cook a steak and put a very ugly and unwanted gray band on a steak in just a few short minutes, especially if you do not flip the steak halfway through cooking. I would also say, that it takes too long to properly rest a steak to minimize any loss of juices.

The Reverse Sear is basically foolproof. The meat hits its target temperature. You can hold the steak for a couple of hours, then reverse sear. You don't have to hold the steak a second time, or any longer than it takes to get from the pan to the dish to the table. It's ready to be sliced and if cooked to Medium-Rare or less....there will be no bleeding. Cooking to Medium temperature will require a few minutes of rest to allow the meat to recover.

http://apinsight.org/best-restaurants...

Nov 25, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
1

Dry-aging beef at home - ISO of specifics please for 28 days

Cut your steaks thicker and use your indoor broiler. You can get your steak closer to the heat. To develop ca crust, you need heat and time.

Nov 25, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Best Chowhound Tip Ever?

Apparently....you missed my contribution above....

:)

Nov 24, 2014
fourunder in General Topics

Prosciutto Wrapped Turkey Breast Stuffed with Dried Cranberries

looks very nice... but I wouldn't us Prosciutto on the outside for a prolonged roasts for something like turkey.. It would just dry out the ham for my tastes. I would use bacon instead....save the Prosciutto for the inside for something else...what you have done would be great for a Chicken Breast.

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Goffle Brook Farm in Hawthorne - what's the point?

I've never heard of Goffle Brook Farm... do you mean Goffle Road Poultry Farm..

http://www.gofflepoultry.com/

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

When oven-roasting a chicken, how do you evenly brown the skin?

I see four remedies or options...Use 1 or 2 with 3 & 4.

1. spatchcock your chicken

2. Vertical roast

3. Brine or marinade with molasses, brown sugar or soy sauce.

4. Use a convection oven

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Empanada wrappers in Union County area

I live in Bergen and the ShopRites here have the Goya Brand, both the Blue packaged white discs and the Tapas Para Empanadas in the red packaging. I would suggest you ask the Customer Service Department for assistance....my apologies if you already have.

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in New Jersey

Split Roasted Turkey: Spatchcocking Plus

1. Whenever I spatchcock, I always remove the breastbone....sometimes the ribcage as well. The bones are left in the wings, legs and thights.

2. Whenever you cut through the backbone and the skin, it's no longer spatchcocking, but closer to French Breasts similar to how a Chicken is often prepared.

3. The advantage of separating the two sides, or breasts, and removing the rib cage is it
* cooks faster and more evenly
* looks nice for presentation
* it's very easy to slice.

Here is a thread where there are some pictures where I split the bird into separate halves.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/928386

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Wet brine? Dry brine? Help with turkey!

I would not use the convection feature for general roasting...especially if you you intend to use 300* or higher. It will cook the meat faster, but the meat at the surface will be cooked more than at the bone.

I would use the convection feature only to brown and ensure crispy skin at the last stage....or after a long rest to raise the temperature of the meat to a more pleasant serving temperature and create a brown crispy skin with the aid of butter or olive oil.

I typically roast most meats at 225, and that would be true for a larger 18+ pound turkey, however, I find for smaller turkeys like yours, under 16 pounds, I prefer to roast at 275. I would estimate:

* 20 minutes at 450

* Drop down to 275 for approximately 2.25-2.5 hours

* Drop down to 140 for a two hour hold.

* Total oven time, about 5 hours.

Here's a thread on four different options

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/928386

For the record....acgold7 is the preeminent authority on Turkey. You will do well to follow his advice.

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Wet brine? Dry brine? Help with turkey!

ac,

out of curiosity, do you find your customers prefer just simply seasoned salt...or a brined turkey for a typical entree dish or sandwich. Do you distinguish between the two on your menu, or just one?

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Preference for Napa or Savoy Cabbage?

You'll have to clarify what you mean for stuffing. In general, I wouldn't use any cabbage for stuffing do to the moisture loss. If I did, I would have to salt first, then rinse and squeeze out as much water as possible. When making Chinese Dumplings, I could see using a fine dice or chop....but I've never liked the addition of Shanghai or Napa Cabbage for that.

As for braising...again, please clarify for how long. As I indicated above it's great for soups as it holds a firm texture....but it's usually added in during the last 30 minutes before serving, not like a Western/Eastern Cabbage Soup which is meant to be softer.

If by stuffing or braising you mean wrapping around a meat mixture....then I could definitely see in being used in place of Green Cabbage for making Stuffed Cabbage or Egg Rolls....or an Asian Style Dim Sum item.

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in General Topics

Best roast duck and pork in Chinatown

I thought BW didn't offer Roast Pig any longer. I haven't been back in over a year, but in the last few otherwise, whenever I stopped for lunch, they didn't have any hanging in the window or available.

Nov 23, 2014
fourunder in Manhattan

Preference for Napa or Savoy Cabbage?

Napa Cabbage will be mush if you overcook it. It loses a lot of water. While it's great for KimChi, slaws and lightly pickled salads, it's terrible as a stir fry vegetable and pretty neutral in taste Savoy is more durable and has better texture, tastes a little sweeter to me. Savoy works better in stir frys and can hold up to hot soup broth, while working easily as well for a slaw.

Nov 22, 2014
fourunder in General Topics

What do you do with leftover seafood ?

Use them as an addition to eggs....on the side or mixed in. Two of the most popular dishes on Cantonese menus are Scrambled Eggs with Shrimp....Seafood omelets/Egg Foo Young. They also work great in steamed egg custard, like Chawanmushi.

Nov 22, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
1

Best Chowhound Tip Ever?

don't trust anyone on Chowhound....

How to avoid mold on bread?

I usually purchase bread at my local market for 3-5 for a $1.-1.20. I always end up eating 2 and forgetting about the last one which ends up moldy as you indicate if I tie the bag closed. If I leave the bag open, or untied, the moisture from the bread can escape and no mold develops. I use the last roll/bread, for breadcrumbs, Croistini or Croutons.

Nov 22, 2014
fourunder in General Topics

Thanksgiving/Festive Recipe for CostCo Boneless Leg of Lamb?

I think it would be helpful if you let us know what temperature you your target and preference is for you. It will help determine what type of method and heat temperature to roast at would be best.

* Rare....high heat(400+)

* Medium-Rare/Medium/Medium-Well....moderate heat(300+)

* Medium Rare/Medium....low heat( < 300)

If the meat is already in netting, there is no need to tie it. You can simply marinate with the mesh on, or remove it to add aromatics and replace the net over the meat again. Roll in would only serve to give you a tighter and smaller diameter roast.

Here's a thread started by fldhkybnva last year and it was her first attempt with great results. There are a lot of varying recipes and method suggestions. It should help you determine which approach is best for your tastes and preferences. she has some nice finished pictures to show her results.

Last, the fat cap is a good thing. It helps to self baste and keep the roast moist. If you feel there is too much fat, just trim some away, but not down to bare meat/flesh.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/889450

Nov 21, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking
1

Chinese-Japanese Cleaver Number Correspondences

Your depth of knowledge on knives continues to amaze me....

Nov 21, 2014
fourunder in Cookware

Slow Roasting Turkey Times... Spatchcocked, Boned & Tied Roll/Porchetta and Single Breast... with Pictures.

I dry brine AFTER the poultry is Spatchcocked.

You have three options to Spatchcock.

1. to do it yourself.

2. To have the butcher do it for you. I suggest you be very specific for him to leave the wings and tips on. Tell him to cut out the back and neck and to remove the Breastbone so the bird can lay flat.

3. Ask your meat Department manager to to the same

When you salt, do the underside/cavity first. The flip over and work your fingers under the skin and rub some salt over as much meat as possible. Last, you can do the skin. If no one eats the skin, there's no point in salting it.

Nov 21, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Chuck Roast.... Roasted Low and Slow @ 220* F.....For A Better Pot Roast ?(Pictures)

Surprisingly, I have never cooked a Chuck Eye. The cut doesn't seem to be popular or available in the markets I frequent

No dumb question....You can absolutely use the low and slow approach for this cut. I understand Chuck Eye is pretty good eating. I would probably sear on the stove first, not the high 450 in the beginning, as the diameter is not that big if not mistaken. Give it the proper rest and give a short blast at the end.

Nov 21, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Slow Roasting Turkey Times... Spatchcocked, Boned & Tied Roll/Porchetta and Single Breast... with Pictures.

Here's another Holiday Roast for a full Steamship of Pork, aka, Fresh Ham.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/928394

Nov 21, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking

Chuck Roast.... Roasted Low and Slow @ 220* F.....For A Better Pot Roast ?(Pictures)

You can control the sear and the overall finished temperature for smaller , less than 3# roasts with an initial sear in a hot pan on the stove. I don't like to sear for more than a minute to prevent any gray band on the rim of the roast. You can cheat for color by marinating in Soy Sauce. With Reverse Sear...The problem with a long low and slow roast, as opposed to a smaller or thinner steak, is the outer surface can become like a dried jerky texture, instead of a Char, from the longer roasting time in the oven, which is tougher to chew.

For larger roasts like the 12 pound Seven-Blade in the thread above, I sear, or rather brown in a prehated oven @ 450 for 20 minutes, or until I can hear the sizzle for a few minutes. The purpose of the sear, or browning really isn't to help reduce any loss of meat juices, but it is really to kill off the surface bacteria, especially if you intend to insert a thermometer at some point....it helps the color for presentation as well. After the two hour hold, remove the roast from the oven to preheat again to 450. Replace the roast back in the oven for 5-7 minutes for small roast, 10-12 minutes for a larger Prime Rib. It will raise the meat temperature to a more pleasant serving temperature, but it will not raise your finished meat temperature to the next level.

I'll use either a stainless steel brazier or Cast Iron Pan. I always roast with the meat elevated on a rack or grille grate over sheet pan or Hotel Pan, depending on how much the anticipated drippings will be. More with poultry than beef or pork.

Nov 21, 2014
fourunder in Home Cooking