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Why Unsalted Butter?

Hi, I'm in Copenhagen, and I'm Danish. Hope you like it here. :)

Jun 28, 2012
tarka in Home Cooking

Beating blood - as you would egg whites?

I doubt the blood on its own would behave anything like egg whites. How about mixing in some powdered egg white? Haven't tried it (obviously), but it might work.

Blutnudeln sound great!

Mar 27, 2011
tarka in Home Cooking

Why Unsalted Butter?

There are plenty of reasons to use salted butter.

1) It's a preservative. It'll keep the butter fresh longer.

2) It "amplifies butter aroma" (McGee, Keys to Good Cooking, p. 200)

3) It's cheaper and easier to find (at least here in Denmark).

That obviously doesn't mean there aren't equally good reasons to use unsalted butter.

Mar 21, 2011
tarka in Home Cooking

Freezer meals that can be reheated/cooked in a microwave/(convection) oven?

If you still have access to your refrigerator, I'm not sure I understand the need to pre-cook meals. Just buy a small hotplate and maybe a cheap toaster oven. You can make almost anything with that setup. Even without refrigeration, you have your pantry items and fresh produce - people have cooked from that forever.

Anyway, if I had to reheat frozen food, I think I'd do some variations of braised meat, and maybe some bean-dishes, and then serve them with polenta or rice that I'd cook in the microwave. Perhaps microwave some frozen peas or green beans to get some fresh vegetables.

Mar 17, 2011
tarka in Home Cooking

Freezing beans - cooked or just pre-soaked?

I think the idea is to have beans that cook quickly. Unless you use a pressure cooker, unsoaked beans take at least a couple of hours to cook.

Mar 17, 2011
tarka in Home Cooking

Freezing beans - cooked or just pre-soaked?

I got a tip in a food column on Danish Public Radio the other day. As an aside in a hummus recipe, the presenter noted that a scientist friend of his always froze soaked beans before cooking, resulting in a much faster subsequent cooking time.

I guess this qualifies as a kind of cryo-blanching, with the ice crystals poking holes in the beans, thereby softening them. In that case, it might be worth putting the beans through several freeze-thaw phases to optimize the results. (You'd obviously still have to cook the beans to render harmless the lectins.)

Yesterday I froze (slow)soaked, uncooked brown beans in a zip-lock bag with enough of the soaking liquid to cover. The thawed beans cooked notably faster than unfrozen beans from the same batch and I didn't notice any major decline in quality, except perhaps for slightly looser skins. Obviously, one batch is not enough to draw any conclusions, so I'll try to split batches of soaked beans whenever I cook them in the future.

In any case, I can't see any reason that you'd have to cook beans in order to freeze them if you'd rather not.

Erik, Denmark

Mar 16, 2011
tarka in Home Cooking