Rio Yeti's Profile

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Foods unique to France to buy in Paris?

Yes most recipes add salt, and I like to control the amount (sometimes even weighing the salt...), with butter that's already salted, you don't have control.

As for the fleur de sel, it's precisely because I can control the amount I'm adding to the butter (based on my preference), that I prefer doing this over buying salted butter. (and also for the crunch)

1 day ago
Rio Yeti in France
1

Foods unique to France to buy in Paris?

DCM beat me to it... For me too, beurre doux and my own fleur de sel. That way I can control the amount, and I can still use the butter to cook with.

1 day ago
Rio Yeti in France

Meilleur Ouvrier de France

Yes, I totally agree with all that you said.

I didn't bring this up just for the sake of argument, I just thought readers of this thread should know what to expect if they buy Larnicol's macarons. But I must repeat that I do like them and respect them a great deal.

Dec 15, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Meilleur Ouvrier de France

Well... I past by St Paul today... Larnicol was open, so I snatched some macarons.

And I stand by what I said. I tasted the almond flavor and the salted caramel, and, while I'm not saying they taste "the same", for 2 flavors that are usually so different, they tasted surprisingly similar. In fact the almond was sweeter and more intense than the caramel which seems strange.

However I also tasted the praliné macaron, and thought that this one tasted very different, in fact the difference actually emphasized the similarity between the two others.
I know Larnicol doesn't use any animal based fats, but the praline macaron did have a sort of ganache, which may explain the difference.

By the way, thanks for recommending the almond flavor, I don't think I would have tasted it otherwise, and it is very good and light, and reminiscent of the "other" kind of macarons from St Emilion (which are not filled, and almond is the only kind).

I must also note that I have never tasted his fruit macarons, so I'm basing my impressions on the almond/coffee/chocolate/vanilla/type macarons (which is the kind I usually buy).

Dec 14, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Meilleur Ouvrier de France

Of course there is a difference, I exaggerated to emphasize the fact that in all his flavors, the macarons being more subtle, less sugary, and the almond flavor shining through, they pack less punch than the other usual macarons that are popular.

I agree with you that the punch of the "others" can be cloying and way too sweet, but sometimes that's what you want, some decadence. Larnicol's are not.

This is why I think, but maybe I'm wrong, that choosing a single flavor, and eating them with tea maybe, will make the experience more enjoyable as the focus will be on the subtlety of his macarons. But if you're in a mood for a caramel au beurre salé that will smack you in the face, which I often am when I'm eating sweets, then Larnicol is not the right choice.

Dec 13, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Meilleur Ouvrier de France

Larnicol macarons are very "natural" tasting, which means they are light and almondy, which is good... except they all end up tasting more or less the same, and therefore become frustrating if you buy a few to have different tastes (as so many people, me included, do with macarons).

Next time just take one kind, and enjoy it for its mellow and subtle taste, or go to other great macaron makers (the ones everybody knows about) which are less subtle, more rich, and in my opinion end up being more "satisfying", even though on a technical and intellectual level I respect Larnicol's more.

Dec 13, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Yam'Tcha bao-mania sounds too good to be true

Oh my...

Dec 07, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Le Cristal de Sel (15th) is closing for good Dec. 14

I think I agree with you... I ate very good canned sardines or tuna (from Portugal and Spain), and although I do see the difference with "regular" canned seafood (usually the texture is a bit more meaty, and the taste more subtle), I still find it to be... canned food... good for a picnic, not for a "high class tapas experience" (or whatever...).

Fresh sardines grilled on charcoal, now that's different !

Dec 06, 2014
Rio Yeti in France
1

Foods unique to France to buy in Paris?

"My 'personal' use this time was 14 kg."

You are my hero.

Dec 05, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Two 3/5 heart (Rubin) Peruvian-influenced places (L'1K & Uma) fall short.

I agree, let's move on.

Nov 29, 2014
Rio Yeti in France
1

Two 3/5 heart (Rubin) Peruvian-influenced places (L'1K & Uma) fall short.

This double interview with Manfred Weber-Lamberdière(also in French, sorry for anglo-readers) : http://www.lexpress.fr/styles/saveurs...

it's an old interview, but interesting... I find it pretty clear who is the voice of reason, and who tries by all means possible to bring down chefs like Ferran Adria...

Again I'm not saying molecular cuisine should be exempt from criticism, in fact I was fairly critical of my experience at 41 degrees (restaurant by Albert Adria), I am not suggesting that we should be blinded by the fact that food trends (like every trend) is often the work of lobbying and PR... I am just wishing for some moderation, and scientifically precise statements, with the use of reason, not emotion.

Nov 29, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Two 3/5 heart (Rubin) Peruvian-influenced places (L'1K & Uma) fall short.

I wrote an article responding to his on my blog one year ago... You can read it here : http://www.chezfood.com/2013/12/05/la... (in french

)

I go into details about what quotes he took from H. McGee, and what quotes he (deliberately) omitted.

Maybe you're right and I'm not familiar enough with his research (if you claim that GMag is not representative enough)... But am I really imagining that he seems to have an axe to grind ?

And by the way, I read a while ago an article on the internet by Mr. Zipprick where my reaction was the same as yours "Such a statement needs to be backed by proof."... Ok, maybe I should try and find the article, to back my claim... but really I don't want to waste anymore time with this.

Nov 29, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Two 3/5 heart (Rubin) Peruvian-influenced places (L'1K & Uma) fall short.

You are right Gargle, and at the same time there is a lot of hypocrisy surrounding that subject.

Molecular gastronomy is applying science and modern techniques to understand how food works, and try to prepare it better or differently.
Molecular or Modernist cooking, is the application of those ideas.

At first chefs got crazy with the new techniques, and tried to outwit each-other and to be extra-whimsical.
Yes, this is fading, but at the same time the core of molecular cuisine is becoming "normal" (so to speak).
Today it sounds almost oldschool to prepare a foam/espuma/mousse with hot/cold ingredients, you can buy a siphon in any cooking store... And little by little, sous-vide precision cooking is also entering the homes. A lot of chefs will use hydrocolloids, whether agar agar, carrageenan, or plain old beef gelatine. Of course they will not put 4 fluorescent bubbles on your plate anymore... they will use the techniques in a more subtle way, and that's great.

But it's also very interesting to see how chefs are described in France... When you read a positive article about Noma it always emphasizes on the natural, the foraging, etc... when it is negative, it always focuses on his past working with Ferran Adria, and his use of hydrocolloids.
Same goes for french chefs... why nobody is ever mentioning that chef Alexandre Gauthier at La Grenouillère is doing molecular gastronomy is beyond me... yes he uses terroir, yes it doesn't "look" fluorescent on the plate but rough and "natural"... but he also uses MANY techniques which just wouldn't be here without molecular gastronomy. Same goes for Akrame, which used to be called a molecular chef, but now that he is the "chouchou" (favorite) of all french critics, they just can't call him molecular anymore...
In other words "molecular" has become a bad word for the critics and for the public, but the chefs (who never liked the word per se, but liked what it stands for), just continue on with better knowledge and better understanding of what they're cooking...

Nov 29, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Two 3/5 heart (Rubin) Peruvian-influenced places (L'1K & Uma) fall short.

Mr. Zipprick was the first to jump on the beating of The Fat Duck when people got sick, and he (like most of the other journalists who rapidly blamed the "molecular techniques") never mentioned the fact that a few weeks later they found out people got sick because of "oysters"... Of course it is not acceptable that people got sick at all, but by selecting the news the way he wants it, he participates in distorting the truth.

He wrote a whole article on the first conference called "International workshop on molecular and physical gastronomy", and the whole article aims at proving that Hervé This was not that important on that day, and that Ferran Adria wasn't there... It is absolutely fascinating to compare the quotes Mr. Zipprick chose to report with the full report by Harold McGee : as it is clear that he purposely manipulated the words of Harold McGee to serve his purpose. When you read the original report you can clearly understand that Mr. This was indeed an important part of the workshop, and that Adria, while not there at the conference, was already working towards bringing more scientific knowledge into food. (and unlike what is implied, Mr. McGee has great respect for Adria and This)

This article by Mr. Zipprick is pure sham.

And then, as a side note, I almost take it as a personal little game, when I receive the new GMag (the french gastronomy magazine), to see how Mr. Zipprick will manage to take a stab at molecular gastronomy this time. It's fascinating that he can write articles about pretty diverse subjects, and still, almost systematically, add a little sentence or two with some irony about something molecular...

I think PhilD summed it up right : "As with all extreme views I think much of the thinking is muddled".
I have nothing against criticism, against being cautious and having a skeptic eye... but when it becomes a personal obsession (whether it is to promote his own book or not, is unclear) it's just ridiculous.

I don't know the guy, and am sorry to criticize someone you work with, as I am very respectful of your work, and can understand that you will defend him. But I am familiar with his work, and just as he scrutinizes every "vaguely" molecular chef, I think when the same scrutiny is applied to his writing, it becomes clear that a lot of it is lacking substance...

Nov 29, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Paris: Japanese/French fusion: where would you go?

Yes that's what I'm wondering.

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

"no offense"

My offense is long past me ! (by at least... ahem... a couple of years... ahem...)

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Paris: Japanese/French fusion: where would you go?

Do you have the book ? I'm curious about it but haven't checked it out yet.

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

Just so you know, they have a sort of huge thermos machine, but they throw out the coffee every hour or so and remake it... so it's not as if the coffee had been sitting there all day.

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

Hehe thanks ! Yes do check it out !

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Two 3/5 heart (Rubin) Peruvian-influenced places (L'1K & Uma) fall short.

"investigator"... Apart from writing over and over the same words, which for the most part are plain out lies (or at the very least an obtuse way of looking at things), and following what seems to be his own personal vendetta (why ? I have no idea), I wouldn't call him an investigator.
He didn't "discover" that Spain and Scandinavia had some PR work done to help with their modern cooking scene. He just likes to be loud about it to insinuate that if you fall for it you've been scammed...

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

@helloterrestrial2014
Never been to Holy Belly... But I think they were trained by the guys at Ten Belles, and use the same coffee, so I'm sure the coffee is good (even from a thermos pot... the one at Ten Belles was a revelation).
Yes the Aeropress is expensive in France... but it was either that or a 500€ Lelit espresso machine... once you know, you just can't go for the middle of the range stuff. And since I was broke (and am even more now) I opted for the cheap solution.
Hopefully one day I'll get the Lelit...

Nov 28, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

Thanks for the article, yes it pretty much sums up my understanding of a "long black".

Nov 25, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Le Cinq's 17 hr lamb shoulder

Can't say about the Maghrebi butchers, because I never went to one (the halal butchers near my place don't look all that great)... but I agree about your comment of non-Maghrebi butchers.

Not only do they want to control everything about the size and way the meat is trimmed, if you tell them how you will cook it and they don't agree with your inspiration, they will immediately make a snarky comment.
I once bought some saucisses de Morteau which I planned to braise in Cider... oh my, you should have seen the look on the butcher's face, like I was out of my mind.

The sausages turned out excellent.

This is one of the sadness in my life by the way, that I didn't find a butcher with quality meat with whom I made a bond of trust... they're all so pretentious in my hood...

Nov 24, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

@RandyB
I've never been to Australia unfortunately, so I trust your experience...
My definition of a long black is only based on the thorough reading and research I've been doing about coffee for a while now... but maybe it's just the new "hipster description" of it...

Nov 24, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Le Cinq's 17 hr lamb shoulder

Usually you do pan-sear meats after (or before, or both) sous-vide.
As for roasts, being a big fan of slow cooks, long simmers, and steady braises, I agree with you.

I just see "precision cooking" as a new opportunity to try new things rather than a method to "replace" other cooking methods.
Anyway, I haven't received my devices yet... so we'll see how it goes !

Nov 24, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

@RandyB

I'm with you on the general "disdain" of long coffee drinks starting to change. However I must note that there is a difference between an allongé and a long black. The allongé, as you mentioned, is made just like a lungo but with even more water. A long black is made by doing a double espresso over a cup of hot water.
The end drink may have the same "water to coffee" ratio, but in case of the long black, the coffee was only brewed for the amount of time necessary for an optimal extraction (usually around 25 seconds), while the allongé was brewed longer, hence often resulting in an over-extraction with its bitter notes.

Having said that, I find very interesting that a barista and yourself tried experimenting with allongés, and the optimal blend/roast/etc... I'm convinced that there is a way to make allongés taste good, it will just probably not happen with your typical espresso coffee/grind.

And if anyone is wondering, the difference between a long black and an americano, is that in an americano you pour the water "over" the double espresso and end up loosing the crema, while a long black keeps the crema intact (whether that actually makes a difference in the taste of the drink other than an esthetic one, is up for debate).

P.S.: Glad to see a fellow AeroPress user !

Nov 24, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

YIKES-Another thread on tipping in france

I do quite the opposite, as I always feel uncomfortable giving money to friends, I think : "Oh, you "tutoye" me ? Then we're friends... I can't just give you money, it would feel weird".

And usually I never come back, as I hate fake familiarity.

Nov 24, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

YIKES-Another thread on tipping in france

Who's Wendy ?

Nov 23, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Good coffee in Paris?

Thanks for the feedback, I will check it out !

Nov 23, 2014
Rio Yeti in France

Le Cinq's 17 hr lamb shoulder

You're right, but steam ovens are more expensive then recent circulators (and you need the space for it), and you'd need a pretty good one to be sure the temperature is accurate and doesn't fluctuate much... having said that, I agree with Ptipois and you that for a mechoui, I'd rather do it in a good old cast iron cocotte. Unfortunately I have the misfortune of having a gas oven that cannot go below 150°C... so I'm doomed for all the low temp cooking (until I receive my sous-vide apparatus that is !).

P.S.: And yes, everyone should have an oven thermometer in their oven at all times !

Nov 22, 2014
Rio Yeti in France