selmelier's Profile

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Maldon salt vs. fleur de sel

You should go out and buy some nice fleur de sel to refill your original container, and then go out and get a nice container for your Maldon! They're very different, so why not have your cake and eat it too! Use the Maldon for your fresh veg like salads, or wherever you want a bright, explosive pop of salt that vanishes like a spark. Use your fleur for toast and butter, fish, pork, apples and watermelon, or whereever you want a delicately persistent mineral glitter of salt.

Nov 16, 2012
selmelier in General Topics

Salt for salt mill

The TJ salts tend to be Sel Gris, or gray salt. They have irregular granular crystals that harbor varying amounts of residual moisture, making them an almost sure-fire bet to gum up the works in your grinder, making it jam within minutes. You need a specialty grey salt grinder such as the Vendome Guerande style mills made by Peugeot for Sel Gris. You need to use a rock salt such as Tidman's, Alaea Volcanic Coarse, Himalayan Salt, Brazilian sal grosso, etc. There is no point in using something cheap--spending an extra couple bucks will give you greater pleasure for months.

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The Meadow
3731 N Mississippi Ave, Portland, OR 97227

Oct 05, 2008
selmelier in General Topics

Salt for salt mill

If you are looking for the most classic salt for a grinder, something clean and delicately sweet, buy Tidman's Rock salt. It is white, slightly buttery, and is a perfect complement to just about everything. The funny thing about Tidman's is that it is super inexpensive, and also one of the nicest grinding salts imaginable. You can find it at our shop, www.atthemeadow.com.

Oct 05, 2008
selmelier in General Topics

Brand of fleur de sel?

My favorite fleur de sels are Pangasinan Star from the Philippines (sweet and lofty textured) and Fleur de Sel de l'Ile de Re (the briny classic with a delicate, fine crystals). Both are available at The Meadow. atthemeadow.com

Oct 05, 2008
selmelier in General Topics

Brand of fleur de sel?

I have a new favorite fleur de sel called Pangasinan Sweet, from the Philippines. This discovery comes to a big fan of the classic fleur de sels from Brittany, France. I have some from Guérande, Ile de Ré, and Ile de Noirmoutier that are great, though my Ile de Ré is from a very small producer and is probably the most elegant. However, Pangasinan is, in some ways, in another category. The physical qualities of a Brittany fleur de sel is there: high moisture content giving the salt a soft and supple body, enough trace minerals to lend mildness, and nice, irregular granular crystals to give complexity. But the family resemblance stops there. Where Brittany salts have a minerally, briny, and slightly sharp flavor, Pangasinan Sweet is round, warm, and faintly sweet. In addition the crystals can be somewhat larger, but are also very jumbled and complex, making for a spectacular crunch. This sea salt brings great depth and richness to anything suitable for finishing with fleur de sel: cheeses, veggies, fish, meats, pastas, etc. People freak out when they taste it for the first time.
--Mark Bitterman, Selmelier at The Meadow

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The Meadow
3731 N Mississippi Ave, Portland, OR 97227

Aug 26, 2007
selmelier in General Topics