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dixiegal's Profile

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Dutch Ovens

I went with LC because I find them so beautiful. I so enjoy the food cooked in them delicious and I never tire of looking at them. It took me a very long time to make myself spend that much on a pot. But it has been well worth it. I just tuck away a little money until I have enough for another pot. But if I could not afford an LC, I would not hesitate to get one of the ones at Walmart. I really, really like enameled CI dutch ovens.

Feb 02, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Do you wash your SS cookware in the dishwasher?

In my new house, I now have my first dishwasher. I know something's can be ruined in the dishwasher, so I have been reluctant to put my tri ply SS cookware in there. About the only think I have put in the dishwasher is my dishes (stoneware) and anything glass, and my SS eating utensils. I know not to put aluminum in there, and I don't put plastic in there either. But I am thinking the SS cookware should be ok. What about copper?

Feb 02, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Cleaning gas range grates

>For the model number, sometimes they're on the inside side of the oven or broiler door.<

My stove is separate for the oven. It's strange. The stove is gas and made by Kitchenaid. The oven is electric - Jen-Air. Not sure about the built in microwave. The refridgerator, which I don't like the style of (don't like the freezer drawer on the bottom, AT ALL), is Amana, the disposal is Kenmore and the dishwasher is Kitchenaid. I guess they were not hung up on any particular brand. LOL. Except the Jen-Air oven. Previous owner said she would def get another one. She loved it.

Thanks for all the cleaning tips. I will be waiting until the weather warms up, so I can take the grates outside. But I so love the gas range. My favorite thing in the kitchen. Like cooking over a camp fire or something. Oh and there is a wood burning stove for heating in the family room. Can't wait to set a pot of beans or stew on that baby. The 'polar vortex' hit before we could get the chimney cleaned and some wood brought in. So it may be next winter before we can put that to good use.

Jan 22, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Cleaning gas range grates

>If your vent fan blows out into the kitchen it's probably going through a filter and you're fine. Run the filters through the dishwasher often.<

There is some kind of filter and a light over the stove. When I was cleaning the tops of the cabinets, it was a bit sticky and beginning to collect a lot of dust. So the previous owner used it. I need to take the filter down and have a look at it. Ahhhh and running through the dishwasher sounds great. Another fun use for the dishwasher. I am having so much fun with that dishwasher. Especially now that I discovered that putting the rinse aid in there really improves the performance. We have a well for our water and the previous owners installed a water softener system for the water. I guess the water has high mineral content. Anyway, it seems to clean everything so much better. The dishes and my clothes. I just have to remember to use a lot less detergents. Same for shampooing my hair. I love the well water, but do have some concerns about the softening system. It is done with salt and I can't help but believe that we are drinking sodium in our water. The water even has a slight salty taste. I will have to investigate that more. Also got to figure out how to get the water tested for harmful things. It sure does taste good though.

Jan 22, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Cleaning gas range grates

>We also run our grates thru dishwasher<

Do they not rust? This is a Kitchenaid range. Don't know where I might find the model number. Maybe I could look up a manual for it.

Oh. And I am puzzled about the exhaust fan over the stove. It does not go anywhere but blows out above the cabinets. I have 10ft ceilings, so there is maybe 2 ft or so of space above the cabinet. But what good is an exhaust fan if it does not exhaust outside the house? Reminds me of smoking sections in a restaurant that was in the same room as the non smoking section. How does that help anything? The smoke is still in the room.
Anyway. Not using the exhaust fan. I have no desire for smelly, damp, greasy air to blow out on my cabinet tops and ceiling.

Jan 21, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Cleaning gas range grates

I have moved into a new house (well new to us. the house is about 7 years old) that has a gas range. This is my first experience with a gas range and I am LOVING it. However, the grates have some build up of grease that I would like to clean off. Not sure how the best way because I don't know what the grates are made of. They look and feel like cast iron. And I don't know if they are coated with anything. I have put some 409 on them and scrubbed with a green scrub pad. It helped, but I would still like to get some of the sticky off. It reminds me of when I don't leave my CI pans baking long enough and the seasoning layer is sticky, instead of hard.
I have considered oven cleaner, and clean it like a regular grill, but I am afraid of damaging it. The previous owners did not leave the owners manuel, so not sure how to care for it.
I am also feeling my way through baking in a convection oven. (Lucky for me it also will bake like a regular oven) Another new path for me. AND I have a dishwasher that I am quickly getting the hang of. (Though I still find myself hand washing a lot of things.) I am also adapting to granite counter tops. Another strange thing for me. But I think I like it. (unlike the garbage disposal that I do NOT like. For it is a vicious thing. >:o/) Just trying to learn how to best care for the granite. I find myself constantly putting mats between the granite and what ever I am setting on it.

Jan 21, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Grinding and Sanding and Reseasoning New Lodge Cast Iron Pieces

>A pan is just a tool, not a work of art, and it works fine with an imperfect cooking surface.<

And I would add that if it is working fine, then the surface is perfect.
Just to point out. That the success of bare CI cooking is not only in the seasoning layers. The success is also determined by "how" you are cooking in the pan. For it is very different than cooking in Teflon pans.
I do believe that using metal utensils and metal scrubbing, will over time put some wear on the pan, along with the seasoning layers. After all, something has worn down my once rough Lodge skillets. For I sure have not sanded them. I also believe that the constant seasoning and reseasoning of the worn off layers, likely has a lot to do with smoothing it out too. Especially the regular burning off of seasoning layers, scrubbing and starting again. I would say high heat cooking, baking on seasoning layers and burning off seasoning layers, would slowly melt those rough layers down.
Whatever causes it, mine are smooth. Not as smooth as machine sanding of the metal, but smooth and as nonstick as bare CI can be.
Some seem to want to look at ci seasoning layers as if it is like enamel or some other kind of man made coating. It isn't. The seasoning layers on CI is always changing with every use. No matter how you use it. It is an ever changing process. Much like our environment. Global warming or not. Our world and all that is in it, is in constant change and always has been.
To me, that is what makes it exciting. I hated the cold weather of the polar vortex. Frozen pipes and extreme heat bill. But I was fascinated by it too. I just love our 4 seasons that we experience in TN. Especially when they all happen in the same week. LOL

Jan 16, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Cast Iron Skillet [moved from Ontario]

Oh another note. My family loves the food cooked in CI (though not enough to do it themselves :o)) I cooked our Christmas breakfast for the first time Both my parents and mother in law passed away in 2013. (been a very hard year and sad holiday year. Christmas always revolved around both my mother and mother in law) So Christmas was at my house this year. And I fried the potatoes and made the gravy in the CI. My son-in-law and daughters commented on just how good the potatoes were. I said it was the CI. You just can't get really good fried potatoes in a Teflon coated electric skillet. That was what my MIL used because the electric skillet was so much bigger than her CI skillet. She had switched to the bigger skillet when the family began to grow so big. Also the CI was getting too heavy for her as she got older and more feeble. Even my mother had switched to Teflon skillets because they were just easier to deal with.

Jan 13, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Cast Iron Skillet [moved from Ontario]

I grew up in the south. Tennessee, to be exact. Cast Iron skillets and kettles were all I knew for years. I grew up eating food cooked in it. Enameled metal pots and some stainless pots for boiling food and sometimes a tin pan for baking. But CI was used for baking too. I did not even know cornbread could be cooked in anything but a CI skillet. I learned to cook in CI as a young girl. I also learned to respect the intense heat of CI too. Many pot holders were scorched by CI and I learned that skin could be branded with CI.
I did leave the CI for some years when I discovered that Teflon cookware was so much easier to use. I even convinced myself that the food in the Teflon cookware tasted just as good as the food cooked in the CI. Then once day on a whim, I decided to drag out my CI and put it back in service. Oh my gosh. The food cooked in that CI was fabulous. It brought back all those memories growing up. Do you know how much better fried chicken is from a cast iron skillet? Eggs from a cast iron skillet? Bacon? Fish? Pan Cakes....Grill Cheese.......cornbread, biscuits ...... homemade beef stew!? ....... fresh creamed corn? ........ fried potatoes, potatoe cakes? ...... turnip greens, green beans??!!!
Is cast iron worth it. YES! And if you should ever get a CI dutch oven. Try popping pop corn in it. It is divine....
pineapple upside down cake in cast iron is good too.

Jan 13, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Grinding and Sanding and Reseasoning New Lodge Cast Iron Pieces

I don't sand my new Lodge skillets. I have not found it necessary. However, I do bake off that seasoning that comes on it, because it never holds up for me. I also put 4 or 5 seasoning layers on before I try to cook in it. Then I will scrub with a stainless steel pad and re-season. Often when the pan is new, then only scrub as needed as time goes on. I can slide an egg out of my brand new Lodge skillet after about 4 seasoning layers, a good scrub and a couple of bakings of cornbread. Then take off from there. The extreme roughness will be gone by then and I am just left with a few smooth bumps that continues to get smoother. Christmas morning I fried hashbrown potatoes in two big Lodge skillets at the same time. One skillet was about 35 years old, the other about 4 years old. Potatoes turned out exactly the same in both skillets. Same for the milk gravy I made for the biscuits. Yep, same results for the eggs I cooked too. I get the same results using a very old unmarked, very smooth, lighter weight skillet and my 4 year old lodge skillet. The non stick quality is the same on both. Food turns out just the same. That is, as long as I remember that the antique skillet is thinner and adjust my heat and cooking accordingly.
With new Lodge skillets, the roughness is very rough and sorta sharp. The seasoning layer from the factory is very thin and of little use on its own. I think it is just there to keep the pan from rusting. The sharpness and super roughness, goes away very quickly with more seasoning layers and a good scrubbing ever now and then. I also use metal spatulas when I cook too. Just like my mother and grandmother did. I do NOT baby my bare cast iron. They all get SS scrub pad scrubbing from time to time. Helps to keep the seasoning layer uneven build up to a minimum. But even at that, all my bare cast iron will go through periodic baking off of the seasoning layers (when needed), and starting over with brand new ones.

Jan 13, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Le Creuset interior discolored by NoKnead Bread - please help

>I stopped worrying years ago about my Le Creuset being discolored. Consider it a badge of honor that shows you actually use the cookware<

Ditto for me. My 4.5 qt that I use most often is discolored. it started when I slightly scorched some white beans and has remained the same. I finally got over it. The pot still cooks as good as it ever did. The only cookware that stays looking brand spanking new, it the cookware you don't use. Just like everything else in life. I figure a couple generations from now, what we think is a new, scorched pot, others will see it as an old pot with character.

Jan 09, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

So, if All-Clad isn't the beat all end all, what is?

I just moved into a new house with a gas stove and I love it! All my 53 years, all I have ever known was electric coil. Now induction is new and cool, I suppose. But I bet ya can't roast marshmallows and hot dogs over the burner.................;o)

Jan 06, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

le creuset Fennel vs Rosemary

oh, and I am trying to figure out which one would go with kiwi the best.

Jan 06, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

le creuset Fennel vs Rosemary

How does the Fennel compare to the Rosemary in color? Looking on the computer, I can't tell much difference in them.

Jan 06, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Testing (debunking?) the flaxseed method for seasoning cast iron

>I basically agree with you. However not everyone fries in bacon grease or lard. That was the reason I wanted to try flaxseed oil for seasoning.<

So you fry in flaxseed oil? I don't fry in bacon grease or lard either, but I season my pans with it.

Jan 02, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

New Cast Iron - Red Tint?

The seasoning layer that comes on the CI when it is new, is a very thin layer. In my experience, it does not stay on very good either. I always scrub or bake it off and start over. When I don't, it comes off after a few cooking anyway. With that said, I always bake on 4 or 5 layers of seasoning before I use the pan. Then I will add a layer after using a time or two. Depending on what I cooked in it. After that, I just periodically bake on a new layer as needed. I always use lard or bacon grease. It just works better. I don't often cook in lard, but I do season my pans with it. I cook in coconut or grapeseed oil most of the time. But neither makes a good seasoning layer. I also wash and scrub my pans with dish soap when needed. Yes, the scrubbing wears away the seasoning layers, but it makes for a nice smooth surface over time. Washing does not wash off seasoning layers. Only washes off the oils, fats and food you were just cooking. Been cooking in cast iron for over 30 years and this method has worked just fine. I can cook the most delicate of eggs without it sticking one bit. Even on new Lodge pans.

Jan 02, 2014
dixiegal in Cookware

Who here Oils their Wooden Utensils....

I don't oil my wooden spoons. I buy the small cheap kind and as they get worn, I use them for other things (like stirring the horse feed, propping open a window, etc) then I just buy some more cheap ones for the kitchen. I baught some nice wooden utensils, once. It was not long, before they begin to split. I had even oiled them. I did not really like them much. They were to thick and chunky. I seldom if ever oiled my cheap ones. They last a long time. I usually replace them due to staining, not splitting.

Nov 28, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

CHOW Reviews: Lodge Logic 12-Inch Cast Iron Pan

I have both newer lodge CI and smooth as a baby's butt vintage CI. I find what ever I cook in either, turns out exactly the same. My vintage, smooth CI is no more non stick than my, not as smooth, newer lodge CI. The only difference, that I can tell is that my vintage CI, is lighter in weight.

Nov 28, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware
1

What specifically about a dishwasher is damaging to cookware?

I have had the problem of paint coming off my glass measuring cups with hand washing. I don't even have a dishwasher. The only thing I can think that may cause this, is leaving them in soapy water too long.

Nov 17, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

Le Creuset - First Timer

Same here Rasp. I always cook for leftovers and use big pots. I use my 4.5 qt LC the most for dried beans. Makes enough for my husband and I to eat on for about 3 or 4 days. My 7.5qt is used for big batches of chili, soups and stews. If I need more, I will use my 4.5 qt too. I think an LC bigger than 7.5 would be more than I want to handle. I have to wash my 7.5 in the bath tub as it is. I also use my lower sided wide round oven a lot too. It is the size that was discontinued. I think it is 6.5. The only other size I want is a 5.5 qt and the cast iron rectangle baker. Since having my LC, I seldom use my bare lodge DO. I only use it to roast or braise meat. And for convenience sake, I often go with my slow cooker for that. Though cooking in the CI def taste better.

Oct 25, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cutting boards

Yea. The end grain board absorbing and holding odors caught me off guard. Took forever to get rid of the onion smell. I could smell that board the minute I stepped in the house. I have put that knowledge to good use. I now periodically wipe my end grain board down with a lime. I love that smell. And taste.

Aug 31, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY????

Ok. I won't fight for $20.00, but they can't have $100. After all, I gotta have enough left to by me another purse to replace the one they took. :o). And true about the casserole dishes. A few years ago, no one would think of keeping someone's dish. But now days, even at my church, they some times disappear. Even with a name on it. And it seems if I ever loan stuff to people, I don't get it back. Or if I do get it back, it is NOT in the same shape as it was. People just don't have respect for others or their property any more. Maybe because we live in such a disposable world. The mindset seems to be that everything (and sometimes everyone) is disposable and replaceable). I keep my cell phone until it won't work any more. My computer has just now crashed, after 12 years. And we have a 1995 ford areostar that we still drive. It will be driven until it is ready for the scrap yard. I even have the same husband of 34 years. Lol.

Aug 31, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cutting boards

Oh, and I forgot to say that Inalways cut directly on my wood boards. If Inwanted to cut on plastic. Inwould have plastic boards instead of wood. If the cut marks bother you, you can sand them periodically. The only thing Indo no longer cut on my end grain, is onions and garlic. My end grain board absorbs and holds those odors. So I use my face grain board for that. It does not hold the odor. But every thing else, meats,!veggies, and fruits get cut up on my Boardsmith board.

Aug 30, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cutting boards

I too am the proud owner of a Boardsmith end grain board. The quality is top notch. Before my BS end grain, I used (and still do, sometimes) ordinary wood boards from any 'mart store. They are the wood strips, face grain boards that look like wood floors. They work just fine. But the joy comes from my BoardSmith board. Just like I cooked ok in my stainless steel and bare cast iron pots. But oh the joy of cooking in my Le Creuset enameled Dutch ovens. Sorta like an inexpensive car will get you where you want to go, but a Corvette, or Cadellac makes it more enjoyable.:o). But at the end of the day, it is what you want and what you need. I prefer my Ford fx4 to corvettes and cadellacs.

Aug 30, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY????

Everything goes good with cornbread :o). Well, everything southern. Bar-b-q, dried beans, turnip greens, tomatoes, Mexican food, steak and gravy, fried fish, etc. My parents generation would put left over cornbread in buttermilk and eat as a late snack. When I wanted dessert, but we didn't have any. My dad would crumble up warm cornbread on my plate, add butter and pour corn syrup over it, then mix it all up. It was wonderful. I guess it would be like a cornbread pancake. Fry cornbread in a CI skillet (like a pancake) and you get hoe cakes. They are great for topping with stuff or making a sandwich with. Cornbread is wonderful with soups and beef stew.

Aug 30, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY????

If you use your cast iron often, the oils won't have time to go rancid. I use my little 8 inch skillet everyday so oils do not have time to go rancid. Back when I cooked everyday foe my family, I too, would just wipe the crumbs out of my skillet, I used for cornbread. I never washed it, just wiped out the crumbs and spread the left over bacon grease. I find that the animal grease does not seem to go rancid as fast as the veg. oils. (Except coconut oil) But they do go rancid. All my oils, except the coconut oil, is kept in my fridge. And even then, I usually throw them out due to rancidity, before I use them up.

Aug 30, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY????

Trust me. Peanut oil goes rancid too. Even in the fridge. Takes longer, but it does go rancid. I can smell rancid oil immediately. Once walked in front of a booth at the flea market that was full of cast iron pieces. I smelled those rancid pans before I ever saw the booth. I could have found that booth in the dark.

Aug 30, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY????

I learned a long time ago to never loan your good tools. Be it a wrench, knife or favorite cooking pot. I don't even take my favorite dishes to church dinners. I keep cheap tools just for loaning and taking places. I don't even shop with cards and cash in my wallet or purse. (Except for about 20.00 or 30.00$) that way if some one demands my purse or wallet. They can have it.

Aug 30, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

cast iron pans are great - REALLY????

All oils will go rancid on the pan if you put it on the pan and don't either bake it in right away or use the pan for cooking very often. I never leave my pans coated in grease or oil that has not been baked on. Just like veg oil on wooden bowls and cutting boards go rancid. Not only does it go rancid, it turns into a sticky gummy mess that attracts dust. It is not necessary to oil a well seasoned cast iron pan. Inhave old cast iron pans in the back of my cabinet that has not been used in years. There is no rust. All they need is washing and they are ready to cook in. I have found peanut oil to work fine for baking on a pan for a seasoning layer. In fact it is the only veg oil outside of crisco shortening that I believe is sufficient. However, lard is what I prefer to use.

Aug 25, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware

Exhaust fan/vent for stove

I don't really want an over 30 year old house. That is what I have now. But for the right price and 30 or more acres, I might would go for it. My exhaust fan is over my stove and is piped through the ceiling into the attic, then the roof vents take it out from there. I know some stoves have a vent in the stove that takes it down and I don't know where it goes from their. Maybe the crawl space if there is one. I will deal with it if necessary. I was just surprised. Guess I could always open all the windows and set a fan in front of the window and blow the kitchen air out. Lol.

Aug 24, 2013
dixiegal in Cookware