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ReeseChiarlo's Profile

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new to wine - recommendations

Hunt, this is a book I reccomend to all my employees at my wine bar, it really does bring a very fresh and easy to follow approach to wine. Not to mention an enjoyable read. Great reccomendation.

Cheers,
Reese

Mar 15, 2011
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

new to wine - recommendations

Hi, welcome to the wonderful world of wine. The Sauvignon Blanc you tried, do you remember where it was from? I would not give up on the Sauvignon Blanc altogether, it has a wide variety of flavor profiles depending on where its from. For instance New Zealand Sauv Blancs tend to have a lot more citrus and sweetness to them, then say a Sauv Blanc from California or especially france. Sauvignon Blanc from Chile are also a whole different profile. Try Sauvs from around the world you might be surprised.

Some other white suggestions would be Vouvray (france), Viogner (California or French), German or Washington State Rieslings, some interesting white blends you might enjoy:

Sokol Blosser Evolution
Conundrum

As well Semillion/Sauv blanc blends form Australia.

Mar 15, 2011
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

I've had it with fruit bombs

I would say in general you want wines from higher elevations. Look for Mountain fruit from just about anywhere, or cooler climate wines. Valley floor wines Aka alot of california, Australia, and Argentian wines tend to be very fruit forward and "hotter" or higher alcohol. Cooler climate wines and mountain wines tend to have much more structure and finese to them as well as offer acidity to them. Lean toward wines from coastal regions.

Also try some washington state wines. In general they tend to not be overy fruit forward and offer complexity and acidity. There are some fruit bombs in washington as well, but not near as many as california, spain and australia.

Dec 31, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

Port Recommendation for Christmas Present?

The 2007 Vintage Ports (which were just released) have gotten fantastic ratings and is something that can be laid down or collected or consumed. Though finding a good one under 50 will be difficult they do exist. Most seem to range from 60-90. A little pricey, but the 2007 vintage is one of the best in recent times.

2003 vintage ports were also good, but not quite as heralded, but can be had at a slightly lower price.

Dec 14, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

Help with Pairing

I 2nd the choice of inexpensive Nebbiolo, and Cahor is also a great suggestion with the truffle oil and shitakes. Though the blueberries throw me off just a bit with pairing idea. Can you tell me more about the flavor profile that the berries add, is it overpowered by the truffle oil and parmesan raggiano, or does the flavor standout?

Dec 14, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

9 varietals in Evolution by Sokol Blosser...

I noticed Conondrum has come down quite a bit in price these past few years. As Sommeliers like myself point people in the direction of Evolution as a more enjoyable and afordable option. Cheers to creating a very unique and oft enjoyed wine!

Dec 09, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

LCBO - "Wines of the old world" class - any reccomendations?

Odd to me is that Old World Wines are the most food friendly. They are best enjoyed paried with the regional cheese, vegetables, herbs and proteins of the same region. Yet they are offering the class without food.

I personally would stear clear of this tasting, unless they are offering some very unique wines to taste, that you wouldnt often get a chance to sample. ie: Gaia, first growths, Beaucastle and the likes.

Dec 09, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

Red Wine that Tastes Like the Smell of Dirt

Some of my favorite "dirty" wines come from South Africa:

2 options for you:

1. Onyx Syrah

2. Rust en Vrede Cabernet or Merlot
(side note this wine was served at President Nelson Mandelas Nobel Peace Prize Dinner). Cocoa, cherry, dusty, hints of vanilla. A great wine with rustic meats.

Dec 09, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

New to wine!

Many wineshops, wine bars, retailers and even sometimes the chain stores offer weekly tastings, usually on a certain night of the week. Contact your local wine stores, or specialty stores and see if this is the case in your area. Its usually a nice and inexpensive way to sample several wines at one time, and meet others who are curious about wine as well.

As well many restaurants offer "wine flights" on their menus usually 3 tastes of different wines. This is also a great way to sample different wines. A friend of mine usually go and each get 2 different flights (usually = to about 1 glass of wine) and share them, by the time we are done between the two of us we tried 12 different wines in one seating, and only consumed 2 glasses of wine each in doing so.

I always use my iphone or a notebook to jot down some notes on each wines, even if I didnt care for them. The more you taste the more you understand your own pallet and what you like and dislike.

As well many wineries offer half bottles of wines. 350ml wich is equal to a little over 2 glasses. Not every store carries them, but a wine shop or speciatly store should be able to order them for you.

Dec 09, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine

How much wine per glass is served at a several course meal with wine pairings?

I have been the wine director at several high end restaurants, and for a wine tasting/pairing dinner, my experience is that restaurants offer a 2oz and at the most a 40z tasting of each wine. As wine director I always choose 2oz pours, and if someone wishes to try a bit more, I would be happy to offer them more

Dec 09, 2010
ReeseChiarlo in Wine