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Omniverous's Profile

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Thanksiving in NOLA

Thanks for that - between one of your bar suggestions and your recommended ponce road trip, my dance card is filling up too (although I'll try to avoid doing them in that sequence). And ditto on the proper preparation of the gin fizz being a thing of beauty. My at-home ritual involves a timer set to 7 minutes and an unwitting guest drafted into sharing the shaking duties before enjoying the alcohol-infused fruits of our labor. And FYI, another member of the celebrity bartender club once taught me that a secret to success lies in shaking it without the ice for all but the last 30 seconds, which creates a nice velvet-y consistency. Cheers.

PS: Searching for a copy of your "Gentleman's Companion" on Ebay leads to an interesting set of results. :)

Oct 09, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Thanksiving in NOLA

Murray was still at the Zig Zag when I last saw him, but I'd bet Bellocq (from the owners of Cure) would be at the top of his list now too. And its seriously "inside baseball", but in the spirit of sharing otherwise useless information with fellow foodie travellers who can benefit from it (my purpose in occasionally chiming in on these boards):

At the French 75, have Hadi make you a Tiki Sazerac...which is an off-menu rum-based creation of his that is exceptionally good even to a purist like myself.

Oct 08, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Thanksiving in NOLA

+1 on all of that. Although I've found it to be alternately uncomfortably loud or uncomfortably empty on various evening visits. I prefer to stick to the recommended Ramos Gin Fizz, which they shake longer than anyone else I've seen and is best consumed early anyway (like, say, on the way to a Thanksgiving dinner if they're open that day).

Since you're into boozing and it looks like you're from Seattle slandau6, you should also check out three great bars that your city's cocktail icon Murray Stenson recommended to me in a leisurely chat about New Orleans a few years ago over one of his perfect drinks (and unlike Gizmo56, I'm assuming you'll get the reference :)

Arnaud's French 75 for a definitive sazerac (but beware the cigar smoke...unless you like it), BarUncommon for their tricked out version of a mint julep (their maestro founder is gone, but his wife was keeping the cocktail program solid on my last visit), and Bar Tonique for a Pimm's Cup or just about anything else - but probably one of their daily drink specials since you'll be spending so much money on all these good meals. Murray also likes Cure, but that's already on your list as it should be. Cheers.

And if hazelhurst or any other locals have a recommendation for a New Orleans version of the mythical "dive bar" that's colorful but not particularly dangerous, I'd love to hear it and maybe slandau6 would too.

Oct 08, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Great Find in Manhattan Beach

Wow, talk about risking the potential of "taking one for the team". Good to know...
In the spirit of your review, if you were instead coming up Rosecrans from the beach, would you drive the extra 10 seconds to go to Il Fornaio instead? Assume that the availability of Flamenco is not a consideration :)
Thanks.

Oct 07, 2012
Omniverous in Los Angeles Area

Suggestions for Halloween dining?

Thanks - Tacolicious has never crossed my radar. And one of many things I love about San Francisco is that when you look at the website of a Mexican restaurant there, you find headlines that read "Three-Michelin-Star Chef Slings Tacos for Tacolicious". My kind of place...:)

Suggestions for Halloween dining?

I have, lol, but not in the last year. Its good (and a good idea). Thanks.

Bachelor Party - Which Two? - Cochon, La Boca, NoLa, Domenica?

I've done Cochon with a pescatarian and it worked out fine as they always have a couple of fish entrees plus delicious wood-roasted oysters and other seafood starters (plus chicken, rabbit, beef, etc entrees) but given the combination of non-pork and non-adventurous eaters in your group, I'd spare yourself the aggravation...particularly if those descriptions are polite code for "picky". Instead, pop in to Cochon Butcher during the daytime for one of their superb mufalettas made with house-cured meats, which rivals the best sandwiches anywhere in my opinion.

I haven't been in a long while and its a safe bet that someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but NOLA is relatively casual per my recollection and seems like a solid, down-the-middle Saturday choice given your group and criteria.

Since Sylvain is on your drinks list, take a look at their food menu too - they do clever interpretations of straight-forward dishes that would appeal to both the food-lover in you and the less adventurous eaters in your group. They're open on Sunday and its a nice starting location for a night on either Bourbon or Frenchman Streets.

Lastly, its hardly my food bible but seems like an appropriate reference for advising a bachelor party: Men's Journal gave a brief write-up recently for a nice neighborhood restaurant off the tourist radar (unless they read Men's Journal) that's Drew Brees' favorite restaurant - Ye Olde College Inn. The food was good on my last visit and the proprietor grows some of the vegetables served in the adjacent lots and offers live music most nights in the bowling alley he owns next door - all of which makes for a pretty unique set of elements. I'd never seen it mentioned when I do my own research here, but it came recommended by a tasteful friend in the neighborhood and might be up your group's alley (pun intended).

http://www.mensjournal.com/expert-adv...

Have fun.

Oct 07, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Suggestions for Halloween dining?

I'm usually pretty self-contained in doing my own research, but I've got a curve ball that some of you plugged-in SF aesthetes may be able to hit. Does anyone have a suggestion for where a non-costumed late 30s out-of-towner ought to dine solo on Halloween night that will be chow-worthy but neither a full-on costume party nor a full-on bore entirely sheltered from the spirit of the evening? I stay locally in upper Montgomery, so near-ish would be nice but location isn't my primary concern and I don't mind venturing wherever for the right spot. I spend 30-45 days a year in SF and have eaten at many of your outstanding restaurants at least once (but certainly not all - and I don't need to try someplace new to me). Bar or counter seating is a must and budget isn't really a consideration (but value always matters and please don't send me to Saison in a Maybach zipcar). Fine-dining, burgers in bowling alleys, or anything in between are all fair game as long as it conforms to the above criteria.

Left to my own devices, I was thinking about taking the opportunity to try Quince, where I've never eaten despite its proximity and the fact that I've been to Cotogna 20+ times and counting. But that would fit my definition of a "bore". Or, more pruriently on the costume-party (or lack thereof) end of the spectrum, I remember reading someplace that the Penthouse club had recruited an acclaimed chef and was going to offer real food...and a solo Halloween in SF seems like the opportune time for my once-a-decade patronage of such an establishment in the unlikely event that report was correct.

Obviously, better ideas than my own are needed. Thanks in advance for any recommendations.

Foodie's first trip to NOLA. Where should I eat?!

I'm late to the party, but this thread's title caught my attention in finalizing an upcoming NOLA trip (my umpteenth, but I'm as curious to learn about "foodie" destinations from the locals as a new visitor).

Zin1953's list is spot-on in my opinion (ditto on "to name but a few") and its noteworthy that it took 10 replies for a fellow foodie to finally get to Cochon, whose chef was awarded "Best Chef" in the South last year by the James Beard Foundation and whose co-owner Donald Link (Beard Foundation finalist for "Best Chef" nationally this year and owner of the also 10th reply-listed Herbsaint) commissioned his own hybrid breed of pigs because he was dissatisfied with quality of the available stock. If all that's not the figurative definition of a destination that ought to top every foodie visitor's list (vegans and kosher excluded), I don't know what is...

For a foodie traveler, I'd include Maurepas Foods, which is doing seriously interesting (but not "serious") small plates and cocktails for a young and appreciative crowd in the Bywater and also R'evolution in the French Quarter, which was pretty great last month in the form of a couple of their inspired gumbos and desserts plus a shared entree at their bar (populated by locals and tourists in harmony). A late October trip uptown for oysters at Cassamento's is a worthy foodie excursion and an unpretentious slice of old school New Orleans (unlike Galatoire's, in my opinion, although its admittedly hard to resist their allure).

And since I see from your previous posts that we share an affinity for the Momofuku Kos and Alineas of the world in our travels, I'd suggest that you and others of similar taste reading these exchanges would find The Grill Room and GW Fins banal but perfectly fine for people who enjoy eating out in posh hotel dining rooms (the former) and non-chain, non-locavore seafood houses that aspire to open outposts in perfectly fine cities like Charlotte, NC (the latter - per the above discussion). But that clientele has every right to their enjoyment too - you're just more likely to find them in The Grill Room at the Waldorf-Astoria than sitting down the counter at Ko.

Have fun.

PS: If anyone who like the sorts of places I mentioned has feedback on Root, that would be helpful to me and probably tboner6. I read someone's post that an event there was a mess, but I've also read good things in the food press and its hard to discern whether its an innovative addition to the local scene or an overly-precious disaster. Thx.

Oct 07, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Le Cirque, Guy Savoy or Twist..help

Thanks for the insight...maybe I'll give LC LV a shot next month. Cheers.

Oct 05, 2012
Omniverous in Las Vegas

Le Cirque, Guy Savoy or Twist..help

Hi - I'm a once-in-a-while Las Vegas visitor (including next month), but I'm curious if you or anyone else has an informed opinion as to how Le Cirque in Las Vegas compares to Le Cirque in New York, which received a 1-star and mostly unflattering (and wholly accurate, in my opinion based on being dragged there on someone else's dime once last year) review in the NY Times recently.

And its completely subjective, but for what its worth to the original poster or other researchers reading these posts, I have a healthy skepticism of multi-course European extravaganzas in the desert (and $500pp+ dinners generally), but to my pleasant surprise the meal I ate at Guy Savoy last November exceeded all of my expectations and felt like a relative "value" (quotes a necessity in this case) considering the cost of flying to Paris for comparably superb contemporary French cuisine bought in euros at their 3-Michelin-starred sister restaurant (whose chefs work in rotations to the LV restaurant, I was told by my beguiling Russian-but-vaguely French-sounding model/server).

Oct 05, 2012
Omniverous in Las Vegas

Nice dinner in New Orleans minus reservations?

Its no fault of your research - I enjoyed it last year, but had difficulty myself in finally finding the details for this year's event, which is no longer called the New Orleans Seafood Festival and thankfully no longer held at the beginning of September.

Here's the link:
http://louisianaseafoodfestival.com/

Oct 05, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Nice dinner in New Orleans minus reservations?

The query I read asked for dinner recommendations, not places open all day - but yes, its good for them to know that they'd have to go on nights other than Sat/Sun. Thank you.

Oct 05, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Nice dinner in New Orleans minus reservations?

GW Fins is a fine choice for a vacationing conventioneer couple, but no matter how many times it gets regurgitated in response to every query on this board, it is simply incorrect that "most of their dishes feature "local" seafood, done with "local" preps". GW Fins is a better, non-chain version of McCormick and Schmick's and the same kind of ubiquitous pan-everywhere upscale seafood house found in every American city with an airport and an audience for $30 plates of seared fish over risotto and $100 bottles of California Cabernet (and an indifference to the dichotomy of those two items co-existing in the same venue).

Or, as they describe themselves in the first two sentences of the "about us" page of their website:
"Dining at GW Fins is like taking a culinary expedition around the globe, dining on the finest quality seafood at every port. Diners might begin their journey with fresh King Crab from Alaska, head south to sample a whole roasted Red Snapper and fly halfway around the world to enjoy Blue Nose Bass from New Zealand. Best of all, diners can enjoy this fabulous seafood all in one meal from their comfortable seats at GW Fins, a restaurant located in the heart of New Orleans’ French Quarter."

Its a perfectly fine restaurant for some people (particularly for the cold smoked oysters in season) and its a favorite of my 68 year-old parents from Scottsdale (who enjoy dining out and don't mind where their fish comes from or whether it pairs with a bottle of Opus 1 as long as it all tastes good and is served in elegant surroundings), but food enthusiasts who read these exchanges as part of their travel planning should have accurate descriptions (ie, one that at least conforms to the restaurant's description of itself) so they can make their own informed decisions about how to choose from the many great dining options in Nola.

And I'd take total exception to the person who thinks Galatoire's is "without pretension", unless there's some alternate-universe dictionary with a more apt word for a jackets-required (and funny hats encouraged) restaurant charging $8 for a side of steamed broccoli just because its drowned in butter sauce. But the food is indeed "straight-forward" (for better or worse) - and both my aforementioned parents and the people who recommend it to every single person who posts (regardless of the query) love it there too.

For jasonsd specifically, I'd suggest that you also consider the Bon Ton Cafe in the CBD, which is legitimately focused on "local" seafood and preparations and has a similar adherence to local culinary tradition as Galatoire's, minus the pomp/pretension and $8 vegetables. It gets busy like all the good places, but as someone who's not big on reservations either I've never encountered much difficulty getting a table as a walk-in party of 2.

Also re. festivals during your visit, I'm all for blues for but I'd skip the BBQ and instead chow down at the Louisiana Seafood Festival in the park at the base of Canal Street, which has three days of good music and all sorts of good food...where, by the way, you can sample Galatoire's shrimp remoulade out of a paper basket while drinking beer and listening to jazz - which for my money is the only way to enjoy their food sans pretension. See you there!

Oct 05, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

UPenn Weekend..need great ideas to take out really great son!

Yes - my teunure was in the 90s and there certainly wasn't much of that kind of locavore cooking in Philadelphia (or most places) at the time. But now its ubiquitous and while they may have invented the computer at Penn, I don't think they've concocted a time machine yet..although my White Dog cookbook still gets dusted off once in a while. Thanks for the update.

Oct 04, 2012
Omniverous in Philadelphia

Great Find in Manhattan Beach

That's good to know - Manhattan Beach needs a good place with a style and price point somewhere in between MB Post and Shellback's. I haven't been in ages, but Lido used to be horrendous (its hard to expound without sounding cruel). Glad to hear its taken a turn for the better..and I could get on board if Ital-Octoberfest is the next fusion trend.

Oct 04, 2012
Omniverous in Los Angeles Area

UPenn Weekend..need great ideas to take out really great son!

Oh, sorry - I started to reply and then got sidetracked. I didn't realize it posted. As I was saying...

I think its under new ownership recently (so someone please correct me if its gone downhill), but in my days at Penn, the White Dog Cafe on campus at 34th/Sansome (near the law school) was the Chez Panisse of West Philly and an excellent destination for weekend brunch (or an afternoon hot apple cider...or a late supper...or just about anything, really). I popped in last year for drinks and snacks in the bar and it seemed as tasteful as I remember based on that brief sampling...if so, and if your son hasn't had the time or resources to try it on his own yet, the two of you should check it out together. Enjoy your weekend at Penn.

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in Philadelphia

Perfect restaurant to have an affair in.

For the record, I'm happily unmarried so I think in terms of trysts rather than affairs, but with all due respect to tranny bar barflys and billionaires indifferent to dropping $1000+ for a few hours at the Hotel Bel-Air, the best restaurant in LA to have a tryst is Jer-Ne in the Marina Ritz-Carlton because no one you'd know goes there (particularly in the afternoon...unless you know a lot of upper-tier road warriors or vacationing car dealers from Kansas City), they have an impeccably-stocked bar, and the hotel above rents rooms at deeply discounted afternoon-only rates to guests with corporate accounts.

The second best restaurant, as generations of philandering studio executives and their naive prey can attest, is Jerry's Deli in Studio City - where the more discreet adulterers actually eat inside the bowling alley next door followed by a walk across the parking lot to the Sportsmen's Lodge Hotel. Again, I'm unmarried so no vows were harmed in this reporting ..but with 72 replies (and in the spirit of food-focused internet anonymity), this information deserves to be shared. :)

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in Los Angeles Area

Thanksiving in NOLA

They're both good choices - either way, you're fishing in the right pond. I'd decide based on whichever of their actual Thanksgiving menus most floats your boat. If there's Turducken, I'd go for Luke as discussed. If you need a non-food tie-breaker, I'd say if you'll be drinking wine, choose Luke because they have a wine list full of reasonably-priced French and German choices that'll pair nicely with turkey (or turkey stuffed with duck stuffed with chicken). If you'll be drinking cocktails, which isn't such a bad idea either for a Thanksgiving in New Orleans, then lean towards Cafe Adelaide for its superior cocktail program (although the A-team may not be behind the bar on a holiday...but you'll likely be too drunk to care after a few drinks). Have fun.

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

UPenn Weekend..need great ideas to take out really great son!

I think its under new ownership recently (so someone please correct me

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in Philadelphia

Thanksiving in NOLA

Sweet - thanks for the tip.

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Thanksiving in NOLA

Yes, that's exactly what it is - a thoughtfully upscale and perfectly executed (at least in my experience) version of country cooking for locals and visitors alike who don't get out to Acadiana for dinner on a given night and appreciate the distinctions between a James Beard Foundation Award-winning restaurant/chef and a country meat market or gas station (both good, both different, and the fact that you choose the former doesn't mean you're ignorant of the latter - although I personally am ignorant of what ponce tastes like, so please tell me if I can try it someplace locally). Dining at Cochon is comparable to enjoying places like the superb Torrisi Italian Specialties in New York, a Michelin-starred destination despite the fact that its menu is an elevation of the same food my Italian-American grandmother cooked with considerably less fanfare, or The Walrus & The Carpenter in Seattle, which serves up perfect platters of the same oysters that local beachcombers armed with a trowel, a pair of wading boots, and an oyster knife can slurp on their own a few miles up the Washington coast.

And I don't think there's much demand for pig's brains since there was a mad cow-like disease contracted by inhaling their mist making the rounds a few years ago...although the presumably non-brain homemade head cheese at Cochon is the best version of that less-lethal delicacy that I've ever had on this side of the Atlantic.

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Thanksiving in NOLA

Unless you consider Cajun cuisine (or restaurants without a dress code) inherently "down-scale", there's nothing downscale about Cochon in my opinion (although I agree that it's great). Its a stylishly-designed and dimly lit contemporary space with an open kitchen and attractive and friendly young servers clad in black. The menu is one full page of well-curated and uniquely prepared dishes specific to the region (plus their excellent house-made charcuterie) - representing, to me, a New Orleans example of the inspired brand of localized, chef-driven cooking that a discerning foodie/traveler seeks in any city. However, someone who is vegan or kosher (or desires a perfectly nice air-mailed Pacific tuna steak or New England lobster risotto when vacationing in New Orleans) may indeed find a restaurant whose name means "pork" to be somewhat limited. Assuming none of those apply to slandau6, check it out and report back so it gets some more love on Chowhound...although presumably the two owners (one of whom cooks in the kitchen most every night) take some solace in their respective (and un-downscale) James Beard Foundation Best Chef awards.

Also, I didn't find any kinks at R'evolution last month, although there was a sociable alt-looking couple at the bar who seemed like they might be a little kinky.

Oct 03, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Visiting SF, where to have cocktails/appys with low-key live music?

I'd call them first to confirm that there'll be music on whatever night you'd be going, but the Comstock Saloon on Columbus Ave. has serious cocktails, tasty apps, and interesting music performed from a loft above the bar that fits nicely on the imaginary "jazz trio to Matt Nathanson" spectrum (everything from a literal jazz trio to a pretty troubadour belting out solo Radiohead covers on their house upright). It gets busy apres-office hours and weekend nights (not a noisy, nightclub crowd - just a victim of its own success) but weeknights and Sundays are pretty chill in my experience. Add a pre-cocktailing dinner at Cotogna a few blocks down Pacific and you've got the ingredients for a sublime SF evening. Cheers.

Thanksiving in NOLA

FYI, I had an exceptional 3-course meal Thanksgiving meal starring Turducken (plus .50 oysters) at Luke a few years ago and recommend it highly if they're doing something similar this year. The food and service were impeccable and such an exceptional value that we felt obligated to order one of their special reserve wines in thanks. Just another option for you..

Also, it was very busy the time I tried it so it must have plenty of fans (my 70ish parents who recommended it included), but I don't think GW Fins belongs on the hit list of someone who wants to go to the good neighborhood places like Clancy's and Brightsen's and the smart newcomers like Maurepas Foods and Bellocq. They've got an ok wine list depending on what you like, but to me it feels like a non-chain version of McCormick and Scmick's, with their lobsters from New England, snappers from New Zealand, and other versions of all the same stuff you can eat in any other city in the New World with an airport.

Speaking of my parents, they also like Galatoire's (as do most people, I think) but no matter how many times I've tried for both lunches and dinners, it always feels like eating at someone else's country club on a Saturday night - where the food is competent/inoffensive but sort of beside the point to both the clientele and the establishment. If I lived in New Orleans and had friends sitting at the next table or got a kick out of having the same waiter who'd served me since birth (or had any interest in the gimmickry of needing that waiter to tell me what's edible on a given night), I'd probably feel differently...but as a frequent visitor I think its kind of an expensive and dull spectacle which is best endured only if you're burdened by a boss or father-in-law who insists on going AND insists on paying. Just my opinion based on your other choices and in response to your question: is it worth it?

Also, Tamarind is a good restaurant with good drinks, but I'd nonetheless recommend sampling two different cocktails at the excellent Bellocq next door rather than one there and one at Tamarind (unless you're eating at Tamarind or staying at the Modern). Lastly, in the spirt of not leaving out bars, try to work in drinks at Bacchanal and/or Elizabeth's while you're in the Bywater to dine at Maurepas. Have fun!

Oct 01, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Single Traveler in Town for 4 Days

There are so many great places in town with either bar or counter service that "where to avoid" might be a more apt question. Since, like me, you prefer a bar or counter seat to a table when dining solo, I'd say avoid the perennial favorites Commander's Palace, Galatoire's, and August (which does allow dining at one of their few bar seats - although the last time I did it I was literally the only person in the bar, which is not unlike sitting a table for one albeit from a higher perch). Cochon (in the Warehouse District) at either the bar or back counter would be a fine choice, as would a stool along the wall next door at Cochon Butcher. R'evolution and Sylvain are both in the Quarter and both great solo. If they're not too busy, Arnaud's French 75 will let you skip their limited bar menu in favor of the full menu from Arnaud's next door (which can be rendered serviceable if you order wisely and consume a couple of their perfect Sazeracs in the process). I also like eating by myself at the Hermes Bar adjacent to Antoine's, but that's as much confession as recommendation. For something a little more downscale but still delicious, the po' boys in the back of the Erin Rose bar are a good late-night option. Back in the CBD, Luke, Domenica, and Borgne are all John Besh restaurants and all nice for bar/counter seating. There are many more choices, but I hope that helps...have fun!

Oct 01, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

herbsaint or cochon

I'm not sure (...or interested in provoking a discussion) why Cochon doesn't get more love on this board, but its one of my favorite restaurants anywhere. In about six visits over the last five years , I've never had anything but a great meal or a great time there...but I also like Herbsaint a lot. Cochon is a little more contemporary/vibrant space in my opinion if that matters to you, but I'd just do whatever appeals to your mood and taste based on a review of their menus. Both are excellent and have their own James Beard Foundation kudos. If you choose Cochon, consider sitting at the back counter where you can interact with the chefs and enjoy the theater of the open kitchen.

Sep 27, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Coffee near Century City

Clementine is great for coffee and camaraderie (and chow), particularly during the week and outside of lunch hour.

Sep 17, 2012
Omniverous in Los Angeles Area

Please Critique My Dining Itinerary!

I think Croissant d'Or is legit enough - unless you're a hardcore aficionado, in which case you may just find it acceptable. And with all due respect to breakfast on balconies, for me the best part about C d'Or is sitting there in one of the window alcoves or their tranquil courtyard - which you might prefer too. Also re. breakfast take-out, I think beignets are better eaten immediately instead of carried in a bag even a block or two back to your balcony...plus sitting at Cafe Du Monde has its own unique "when in Rome..." charm, in my opinion.

And from someone who shares your appreciation for both booze and staying somewhere in the French Quarter with its own private outdoor space, you might instead prefer to utilize your balcony by picking up a nice bottle of wine at the Vieux Carre' wine shop on Chartres near St. Louis and having a glass or two al fresco in between all of those good meals.

I'd also save your app for R'evolution by skipping the apps at the French 75, where the cocktails far outshine the eats.

While I disagree with the people I've read who recommend lunch in the garden room at Commander's Palace to every visitor, I do second the person who recommended it for you (via streetcar) if you're taking your mother and most of your other meals are in the FQ.

And lastly, as somebody who also begins his Saturday mornings in New Orleans at C d'Or and ends them with Bloody Marys at Bar Tonique, you should investigate the place I like to dine in between - Bayona, which has inspired food, would be a nice place to take one's mother, and serves a 3-course lunch on Saturdays for $20something pp. Hope some of that is useful - have fun!

Sep 15, 2012
Omniverous in New Orleans

Help with 'Old' Hollywood Dining itinerary + questions re. Cicada

And very lastly, its not on any of my to-do lists and totally un-Chowhound, but given all that you seek, you and your party might also enjoy the Magic Castle,which is down Franklin from your hotel and a fun place to visit once, in its own cheesy, expensive way. Their website has all sorts of info you can digest, but someone told me semi-recently that you can skip the member/guest requirement by calling them directly and reserving a table for dinner. If it looks fun to you, give them a call and scope it out.

Sep 10, 2012
Omniverous in Los Angeles Area