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A Night Out in Coronado?

foodiechick,
Thanks for suggesting Leroy's Lounge. It sounds interesting enough to try sometime for lunch, maybe, especially given the beer list!

Sep 30, 2011
cakewhole in San Diego

A Night Out in Coronado?

scottca075,

Thank you for this thoughful but concise reply.

This will be a "congratulations" dinner, so I'd like to send them somewhere that is "nice" in the sense of excellent food (price be damned since it's on my dime), decent to good atmosphere and/or view, and good service. An interesting wine list would be a plus.

Right now I'm leaning toward 1500 Ocean, but I'll take a look at the other places you mentioned. Thanks again.

Sep 30, 2011
cakewhole in San Diego

A Night Out in Coronado?

Hello All,

I'm seeking suggestions for a restaurant in Coronado where I can send some close friends to dinner.

Scanning this board I've found positive recommendations for 1500 Ocean (at the Hotel Del) and for Sapori.

Can anyone expand on these recommendations either by telling me a bit about your experiences with these places, or by suggesting other options? I'm open to all food types and price levels.

Thanks for your assistance.

Sep 29, 2011
cakewhole in San Diego

fruitcake question- cheesecloth?

Hello All,

I have a question about storing fruitcake.

Can anyone tell me why most fruitcake recipes call for wrapping the cake in liquor-soaked cheesecloth before wrapping in plastic wrap/tinfoil? I have found no explanation for this step.

Ages ago I worked in a bakery that used this method, but the recipe I currently use (Alton Brown's, which is excellent) does not call for this.

Is there an advantage to using cheesecloth before wrapping in plastic wrap? Does it somehow help preserve the cake for a longer period of time?

Many thanks.

Dec 15, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

rose geranium buttercream?

All,

I'm trying to recreate the delicious rose geranium macarons that Miette (pastry shop)makes in San Francisco. Can anyone suggest how I might make the rose geranium-scented buttercream? I have experience making buttercream but not much experience infusing it with fresh herbs.

Many thanks.

Oct 07, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Which foundational cookbook would you give a beginning 23 YO cook?

As someone with a lot of experience in the kitchen I STILL turn to my copy of Joy of Cooking. I find that it has a lot of basic information and recipes as well as recipes that may interest more advanced cooks. I think it's a standard for a reason - even if it's not especially fashionable. I think JOC would cover many of the issues about which your niece has expressed interest.

Jul 13, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Best Whoopie Pies in Maine?

Two years later, here, but is there any chance you'd be willing to share the recipes? Made my first Whoopies at home last month- not bad, but would be interested in trying other (well-regarded) recipes. Many thanks.

Jul 06, 2010
cakewhole in Northern New England

any sweet/dessert bread recipes w/o butter??

Would quick breads fit the bill? I'm thinking of things like banana bread, zucchini bread, even carrot cake. Recipes for these types of things often call for vegetable oil (I usually use canola) rather than butter or margarine.

Wish I could help you with the no-butter/margarine cinnamon roll quandary...

Apr 26, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Clover Stornetta heavy cream turning into creme fraiche

Me, too- Clover! Clover! Clover!

Apr 10, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Mayo mixture for chicken salad

Yes, equal parts mayo and plain yogurt (prefer Trader Joe's organic "European-style" yogurt which has great tang). Plus curry powder, chopped toasted almonds, celery, and s+p. Sometimes add chives or green onion. Delicious on wheat bread, excellent for using up leftover chicken.

Apr 10, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Cooking Task You Detest the Most?

I also detest washing salad greens, even with a salad spinner. Can't explain it.

Mar 05, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Make ahead for hot breakfast grains?

I do the same: bring 3 1/2 cups of water to a boil, add one cup of steel cut oats, cover, turn off heat. Refrigerate over night. Rewarm on stove top or in microwave the next morning. Add favorite toppings.

Mar 05, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Frosting that is light and not too sweet?

Let me chime in with the whipped cream people- please go with whipped cream! It's easy to make and easy to decorate- press toasted sliced (not slivered) almonds or even coconut (toasted or not) into sides of frosted cake for a pretty result.

Feb 08, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Dessert for special date: cheesecake or chocolate mousse?

Another vote for mousse.

While I (female) personally would prefer an interesting cheesecake, 1) I think the occasion call for chocolate mousse, and 2) in my experience people seem to be in love/hate relationships with cheesecake.

Furthermore, after a date a small ramekin or dessert cup of mousse might be lighter / less likely to give you that "full belly" feeling than a wedge of cheesecake... just sayin'.

Let me chine in with a "yes" on an optional fruit puree on the side.

Good luck!

Jan 04, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

cooking/grocery shopping/MEAL PLANNING is a lifeskill I just do not seem to have. Advice on frugal(ish) HEALTHY options?

There have been so many excellent suggestions posted here- I especially liked all the paths that Dairy Queen suggested. Here are some of the steps we take to eat relatively healthily and without breaking the bank (many of these ideas mirror suggestions already made):

1) We always have a container of beans in the fridge and several in the freezer. We start with 2-4 pounds of dried beans (we favor black beans but also use dried pinto, garbanzo, lima, white/cannellini, red/kidney-types, etc.). We soak overnight and the following day (our most typical variation with black beans) we saute and onion or two, a few cloves of garlic in olive or canola oil. Then we add spices (usually ancho chile powder, oregano, and cumin) and soaked beans and fresh water to cover (adding water as necessary) and cook til tender- from 1 to 2 hours. At the end we add salt and adjust seasonings. We freeze in 2-4 cup increments and take frozen containers out ca. 36 hours before we want to use them. This type of project almost single-handedly got us through the lean years of grad school.

2) Similarly, we always have a large container of brown rice cooked to eat with said beans (or as a grain side dish with cooked chicken, etc.).

3) Between beans and rice, the meal options are enless for dinner (and easy to reheat for lunch). You can have basic beans over rice (plus fixings- we favor tomatoes, cheese, diced bell pepper- almost chili-like), or you can add corn tortillas for soft tacos, or flour tortiallas for burritos. We make a bean casserole by turning cooked polenta into a casserole dish, topping with beans and cheese, and baking til hot and bubbly. Or, you can make a simnple huevos rancheros- fry a few eggs and put beans and tortillas on the side for a dinner or for weeekend brunch.

4) With other beans (say cannelin or kidney or garbanzo) you can make various cold bean salads, or add them to a simple vegetable soup ("cheat" with decent purchased chicken or veg broth/stock- check Trader Joe's tetra packs), or add beans to cooked pasta along with some blanched vegetables. I like tossing garbanzos with chopped fresh tomatoes and garlic (plus fresh spinach or other leafy green, and maybe lemon zest) with cooked pasta. Leftover chicken is nice with this, too.

5) I can't say enough about the "whole chicken lasting you a week" idea. You can eat it cold as a leftover, or shred it for soup, pasta, or grain dishes- or even burritoes when mixed with beans. You can make a cold chicken salad for a sandwhich filling (one example: I dice chicken, add celery and a bit of mayo and/or plain yogurt, salt and pepper, plus a bit of mild curry powder... sometimes I get fancy by adding chopped toasted almons). Or a cold pasta salad (pasta tossed with oil and vinegar or favorite purchased dressing plus chicken- and garbanzo beans!- and other fresh vegetables). You can freeze cooked chicken in small portions and take it out as needed for various preparations. You can add cooked chicken it to a basic bean chili recipe...

6) Can I chime in about eggs? Eaten in relative moderation eggs are a fast and relatively inexpensive source of protein. For breakfast, lunch, or dinner we eat them: scrambled, poached, sometimes fried, or hardboiled. A straighforward omelette filled with just cheese, or raw or cooked veg, or leftover seafood or meat, is great. (Try looking for Alton Brown's omelet recipe online- it's easy once you've tried it once or twice, assuming you have a nonstick skillet.) Eggs can be paired with sweet (breakfast) or savory (lunch or dinner). We often pair with bread or toast, salad, steamed vegetables, etc. And let me sing the praises of hardboiled eggs, especially for lunch! You can eat them on the run (straight out of the shell) or in a egg salad sandwhich (I like mine curried like the above recipe for chicken salad but it can be as basic as diced eggs with a bit of mayo or salt).

7) In addition to beans we like to keep frozen batches onhand of: vegetarian or chicken chili and soup (especially a basic lentil soup- so inexpensive with just water (or broth), lentils, a few carrots, celery, onion, and garlic- can be dressed up with coins of cooked sausage or small chunks of feta cheese or toast or fresh greens tossed in...). It's also nice to have a large batch of "spaghetti sauce" (whatever your vision of this may be) frozen in 2-4 cup increments. Once defrosted you can eat as is or add fresh vegetables or cooked sausage, etc.

8) You also specifically mentioned breakfast. Aside from cold cereal, we regularly make large batches of hot cereal- which reheat easily in successive days if you have a microwave (and is still doable on stovetop). Sometimes I make a large batch of oatmeal or steel cut oats the night before, sometimes the morning of. I like to add dried fruit, frozen fruit, fresh fruit, chopped nuts, milk... sometimes brown sugar or maple syrup. The options are endless, it's pretty good for you, bought in bulk oatmeal and other dried cereals are reasonably inexpensive. Leftovers keep in the fridge for a few days.

9) So, we have some basics that rotate through our lunch and dinner menus (and we do plan the outlines of our dinner menus on Sunday nights so we have a sense of what we'll eat and shop for during the week)- basics being beans and grains in various ways as well as eggs and chicken. We also throw in a fancier meal about twice a week (say, quick-roasted pork tenderloin- a one pan dish!- that can be used for lunch the next day, or hamburgers with sweet potato fries, or a stir-fry, or fish).

Finally, two cookbook recommendations. In the words of Dairy Queen, "don't laugh": while I have plenty of fancy and/or specialty cookboos, I think "Joy of Cooking" is a good cookbook to have on hand. It has its problems, but it gives (for the most part) decent advice about the basics of cooking meat, veg, eggs, etc. and can come in very handy as a place to consult about basic (as well as more advanced) techniques. Some of the recipes are dated; some call for fancier ingredients; but many recipes are fairly basic. Maybe check out a copy in your local library to see if it might be of use to you.

Also, you might look into a cookbook by Pam Anderson (no, not THAT P. Anderson) called "How to Cook Without a Book." Sounds gimmicky but I've found it useful for its organization and steps. It has maybe 15 sections, such as: Salads, Soups, Omelettes, Tomato Sauce, Stir-Fry, Sautes, Roast Chicken, Vegetables, Chicken. Each section begins with a few paragraphs about the general technique (say, for making tomato sauce). Then they provide a basic recipe. The book then provides several variations on this recipe. I think the idea here is to show a person the METHOD for a type of dish, then provides variations that a new cook can get comfortable with. Ultimately this gives a person a basic repertoire of cooking skills that one can use and experiment with. It's only fault: no section on dried beans!

Good luck and keep us posted!

Jan 02, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

New Year's Day menu. What's your family's traditional meal for a lucky new year?

Hear, hear! To both a "brave and lucky new year" and "negligible family ugliness and fuss." Bring on 2010...

Jan 01, 2010
cakewhole in Home Cooking

PUMPKIN ICE CREAM- Philadelphia style or French?

This is probably too late, but what if you made an "ice cream pie" out of the pumpkin ice cream? You could make it with a cookie crust - maybe with ginger cookies or graham crackers. You could even throw in a layer of (melted) chocolate; chocolate and pumpkin, mmm!

I think pecan pie would nicely accompany pumpkin i.c.
What did you finally do?

Nov 29, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

PUMPKIN ICE CREAM- Philadelphia style or French?

Another vote for French- it's a texture thing for me, plus it seems richer. Let us know how either the Philly or French i.c. turns out...

Nov 24, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Samosa House vs. Bawarchi

Thanks for the very interesting comparative review. Haven't made it to Bawarchi yet but there has been some recent debate about Samosa House (and Bawarchi), among others, here:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/663964

Nov 23, 2009
cakewhole in Los Angeles Area

Best Pumpkin Pie recipe?

Has anyone tried the recipe from _Chez Panisse Desserts_? I'm considering giving it a try and would appreciated any feedback.

Nov 23, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

ISO Not so Sweet, no Corn Syrup Pecan Pie

scott123,
Thanks for your clear explanation (and math skills). My maple syrup is 53 carbs per 1/4 c., so I feel confident about changing the recipe a bit. Thank you for walking me through this.

Nov 22, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

ISO Not so Sweet, no Corn Syrup Pecan Pie

Hi Scott123,

Wow- lots of great and interesting info here, thanks to your (self-described) sweetener fetish. I'm hoping you can answer a question for me based on your knowledge. Perhaps the answer is already in your long post, but here's the question:

I'm making a Maple Pecan Tart (in place of Pecan Pie) this year. I would like to shift around some of the sweetener ratios. I'm not concerned about too much sweetness but I am concerned about (radically) compromised texture or egginess along the lines of what you mention in your post. So here goes:

The recipe calls for 3 lg. eggs, 1/2 c. brown sugar, 1/2 c. maple syrup, 1/2 c. corn syrup, 1/4 c. butter, and 1.5 c. pecans.

Since some reviewers noted that this recipe (Bon Appetit Nov. 2007) was light on maple flavor I'd like to increase the amount of maple syrup. Here's the change I'm thinking of making: I'd like to increase the maple syrup to 3/4 c. and decrease the corn syrup to 1/4 c.

Do you think this would result in textural (or eggy) disaster? Many thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Nov 22, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Dark vs. Light corn syrup?

Grade B is my preference for pancakes, etc.- it's all I have and what I'll use. (If only I had some of my great-aunt's homemade maple syrup; 2007 was the last year she tapped trees). Thanks for the reply.

Nov 21, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Dark vs. Light corn syrup?

I'm making a maple pecan tart (Bon Appetit Nov 2007) that calls for 1/2 c. maple syrup and 1/2 c. dark corn syrup. I am thinking of using LIGHT corn syrup instead becuase that's what I have on hand.

Two questions:
1) Flavorwise do you think substituing light for dark corn syrup will radically alter the flavor, and (a related question):
2) The main flavor of the tart is supposed to be maple, yet some reviewers of the recipe commented that they thought the maple flavor was too subtle or nearly undetectable. I'd like a more pronounced maple flavor. Do you think it would affect the texture of the tart (or change baking time, etc.) if I increase the maple syrup to 3/4 c. and decrease the corn syrup to 1/4 c.?

Nov 21, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Has Anyone Tried the NYT Nutmeg-Maple Cream Pie Recipe?

I'd like to revive this post as I ready my Thanksgiving dessert list . This recipe looks delicious; has anyone made it recently? Please report back.

Many thanks!

Nov 20, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Pie makers: do you or don't you ?

Thanks for directing me to R.L.B. Option #2, which seems popular among some other CH'ers, sounds like a great option.

Nov 20, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Pie makers: do you or don't you ?

Thanks very much for the clarification! This does make sense. Now I just need to decide if I'll do a 20-minute partial bake or go the preheated pizza stone/sheet pan route. And yes- I wish the day would finally get here so I can stop obsessing about pie! Enjoy your baking projects and Thanksgiving.

Nov 20, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Organic vs. heritage vs. free range turkeys - worth the extra cost?

Well put, mcf. One's answer to the OP does depend on one's priorities and what "better" means. We're opting to buy a free range pastured turkey this year, as we did last year, that was raised within 300 miles of us. Why? I feel strongly about how the turkey is raised and what is (not) added to the turkey by the processors, namely fillers, flavors, and other junk.

We do pay a bit more for this, but it is 1x per year and I'm glad to support a (relatively) nearby farmer. How to justify the extra cost in this economy? We eat very little meat, thus when we do buy meat we have a bit extra to spend on meat raised, slaughtered, and sold in a way that we prefer.

One thing about the Heritage birds: while I have no direct experience with this, my understanding is that they must be cooked differently than your average Butterball-esque bird. Apparently most purveyors of heritage birds provide strict instructions about how to properly cook them (so they don't get overcooked/dried out).

Nov 19, 2009
cakewhole in General Topics

Pie makers: do you or don't you ?

gansu girl,
I checked out the ATK recipe that you refer to (a few posts above)- looks interesting. THank you for the idea and for the reply.

One question: in the post immediately above it sounds like you distinguish between a blindbaked crust and a "completely" cooked crust, and seem to suggest that a blindbaked crust would be fine but a completely baked one would be a disaster. Is a blindbaked crust not completely baked?

Also, the ATK recipe you referred to does, as you mentioned, have you blindbake the crust. Does this not result in a completely baked crust?

Thanks in advance for clarification.

Nov 19, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking

Pie makers: do you or don't you ?

Thank you for the recipe and the response. Yes, I typically place my custard pies on a half sheet pan in the oven; never thought this would keep the crust from cooking through so I'll skip that this year. And yes, I use a glass (Pyrex) pan, too.

I like your suggestions for either baking the pie low/then higher, OR par-baking. I may try one or the other of these methods.

Nov 19, 2009
cakewhole in Home Cooking