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Copper and stainless cookware is rubbing of on my range grates

I have a mix of cookware. Some decent stainless and some cooper bottomed stainless. The cast iron grates have a rough surface and I'm noticing metal rubbing off from the cookware on to the grates. I do have continuous grates and move cookware around quite a bit.

Curious if this is normal and to be expected and something that I'll just have to live with. Or is it poor quality cookware. Copper is soft so maybe this is the culprit.

Dec 08, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Removing stains from a gas burner base

I can't remove stains from the burner base on a new Monogram gas range. So far the cap has not stained, but the base has some stains that I can't remove. By the base, I mean the part of a closed burner that the cap sits on and it has the brass fitting with the ports and what appears to be a cast iron outside enclosure. Its the exposed cast iron part that is stained.

So far I've tried soap and water and a good sponge product but the stains won't come out. Not sure what else might work. If anything. Maybe the high heat is just going to permanently bake on any drips.

Dec 08, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Need a new gas range but overwhelmed by poor product reviews.....help!

I have seen the entry level BS with along with Wolf etc at a store. It's not high end in appearance for sure. It's quite industrial or commercial looking in comparison to the more expensive ranges. But it may well be as good as the others in performance. And maybe reliability too. I doubt it is in your stated budget range though. And as I said before, check out NRX.

Dec 04, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Need a new gas range but overwhelmed by poor product reviews.....help!

Check out NXR. Either direct from their distribution center in California or I think Costco sells them too. Here's the Canadian Costco listing.
http://www.costco.ca/.product.1036920...

Dec 04, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

GE Monogram All Gas Range: Impressions

This is the latest version (3) of the Monogram range. I spent a couple of months reading posts here and at gardenweb and found quite a bit of useful information on ranges. So I wanted to post something on my experience with this range. I have never reviewed an appliance but it can’t be that hard. Here goes.

The Monogram replaced an 11 year old Kitchenaid all gas Superba that started having issues with the electronics a few months ago. We hardly used self-clean over the life of it. Maybe 10 times. And not at all in the last 4 years. But recently I had to season a couple of De Buyer pans and I chose to use the 500 degree bake method. The LED display that shows the status of everything started to go off intermittently. The control electronics worked fine. I could turn on burners and the oven and all the different clock functions worked, but I’d be flying blind without a display. It wasn’t a safe situation really. And I could not get an exact match replacement for the board and display, and what I could get cost $700. I attempted to it repair myself. I have some electronics background. But I ended up making things worse by breaking a couple of connectors which totally disabled the display.

I really wanted a dual fuel range like a Wolf, but it was out of my price range. And I don’t have 220V wired in for the duel fuel. I also wanted a range that didn’t have onboard electronic circuit boards. Self-clean wasn’t top on my list, but my wife wanted it. After reading a lot of posts on discussion boards I went shopping at local stores. I looked at quite a few ranges including the same entry level BlueStar that is available at Costco. But my wife didn’t like the look of it. The Monogram looks better for sure. The Monogram does have electronic controls and a small display as well as self-clean. These were strikes against at first. The electronics are for self-cleaning, a basic timer and oven temp. But I talked with Mabe parts and discovered there is a module containing the display and circuit board that only cost $170. I have the part number and will buy this part in a couple of years. It’s the one customized part for the range that could wear out thru time and heat damage. Each previous Monogram version has a different board so they are not interchangeable, but other parts can swap. And interesting to note that GE has a parts retention policy that I found out about when talking the customer service. GE entry level product line will keep parts in stock for a minimum of 5 years. GE Monogram parts are retained for 10 years. Interesting! Don’t quote me on the details of that. I’ll still buy the circuit board module and stash it away. Almost all other parts can be replaced off the shelf. The Monogram also has internal cooling for the electronics. There is a fan that draws in fresh air from the front and blows out the back. In theory that should mean this range will be less apt to suffer from heat damage to the internal electronics. The old Kitchenaid had no internal cooling that I know of. You will hear this fan when the oven is on. This range also has a convection fan in the oven. Full warranty is 2 years. Lifetime on the grates I believe. Cost was $3800. Pricing is controlled by GE so no negotiating.

This range is assembled at a high tech plant in Mexico. You can find a video of the plant online. The shipping carton and all the packaging was very impressive, but also frustrating. Everything that can move is secured with a very strong and adhesive shipping tape and it was a pain to remove. And there was a very generous amount of shipping foam. It took me about an hour to unwrap it before I could slide the range in. I followed the burner tests and everything was fine. You have to remove the bottom oven plate and expose the burner to check the flame. The burner is quite impressive. It reminded me of a Weber BBQ burner. There is a burn off period for that burner. The dual flame cooktop burners tested fine. The range has a unique leg leveling system. There is quite a bit of travel with the system. I must have raised the range about 2 inches. Once you raise the range, the roller system is disengaged. So you slide it in lowered so the rollers are engaged, and then you raise it once in position. Consequently, if you have to slide the range out, you have to lower it first. So you need this system to work. The feet in the front are adjusted using an included wrench, which was fine. The rear has an extended rod in each corner that is accessible from the top of the range, which is convenient. Use a ¼ inch socket driver to turn the extender rods. But the left side rod was out of spec and smaller. I used a crescent wrench and managed to get it up and leveled. I’m working with local service to get that rod replaced and I’m not sure what is involved with that. I hope the range doesn’t need to be dissembled much.

I’ve been using the Monogram for a month. So far, it’s been great. No issues with stove top, oven, electronics, fit and finish. The sealed dual flame stacked burners take getting used to. As do the control knobs and the High-Low graphic indicators. The cutoff point where the simmer and main burner kick in is pretty seamless and easy to work with. The low simmer is quite amazing. Much better than the Kitchenaid. And the high 18K BTU burner is a champ. I have no comment on the oven at this point. And I have not used the broiler yet. As for cleaning, the black porcelain cooktop needs careful attention. You can’t use an abrasive sponge or cleaner or you’ll scratch it. And the grates are easy to work with so far. I’m working on a technique for cleaning and it’s a work in process right now. And this point, I’m impressed with the Monogram. It looks great and seems well designed and well built. I hope to say the same thing in 15 years. Next step is to get some nice looking Williams Sonoma or All Clad cookware to match.

Nov 28, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Issues seasoning De Buyer Mineral B

I appreciate all the replies and recommendations for alternate seasoning approaches, but I just got off the phone with Williams Sonoma and they will allow me to return both pans for full refund. I can't resist that offer. If I couldn't return them, I'd try these other approaches because I wouldn't have a choice. And maybe I'd learn to make it work. But with this option available to me, coupled with the fact that these pans seem so darn particular about the seasoning process and have frustrated me immensely, I think I'll return them.

I've been thinking about a new stainless set now that I have the new gas range. Most of my existing pans are not tri ply at all. My daily fry pans have a cooper bottom exposed and it is rubbing off on the monogram grates. So I'm thinking I should get a new 10 pc set of the Cuisinart LFT French Tri Ply. And add in some single pieces including Lodge cast iron.

Nov 20, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Issues seasoning De Buyer Mineral B

I'll try that approach. It's not the same as cooks illustrated 500 degree bake method, but maybe the DB mineral iron pans react differently when it comes to seasoning methods. BTW, I did remove the bees wax with the potato skin boil.

Nov 19, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Issues seasoning De Buyer Mineral B

So what is it? Care to elaborate?

Nov 19, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Quality fry pan (stock pot height) recommendation to keep splatter off a range

Yes, I have a splatter screen. Not that mesh window screen type though. I find they don't last very long. I have a Calaphson splatter screen device that is more like a vented stainless steel lid than a screen. It's nice. But when i have to pull it off the pan to stir/flip etc, splatter flies all over. That's why I thought the solution would be to get a deep sided fry pan.

Nov 19, 2013
b.mac in Cookware
1

Issues seasoning De Buyer Mineral B

This is a bit disappointing to hear Zeldog. I read a lot of positive posts on chow regarding DB mineral pans. I don't think I read one post regarding seasoning issues. If this is true, I would expect to there to be historical accounts posted on chowhounds.

I did get my two DB pans at Williams Sonoma on sale thankfully. But bailing on them, even giving them away, isn't all that easy. I might as well drop them off at a recycle bin.

And I've read that current Lodge pans aren't that great either. Not very smooth (to your point, that could be a good thing).

I was really just looking for a good alternative too teflon for cooking up eggs in the morning. I don't like my stainless cookware for that. And teflon doesn't appeal. An iron pan seemed to be the best choice. And a french made one sounded... to good to be true I guess.

I'm going to email debuyer and ask for advice, but I don't expect to hear back. I have already emailed them once before purchasing and did not get a reply. I don't think their English customer service is very good. And I'll see if I can get a return from Williams Sonoma.

Nov 19, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Quality fry pan (stock pot height) recommendation to keep splatter off a range

I have a new GE Monogram gas range and I'm trying reduce spray/splatter to make the new look last longer. Yes, I'm vain. But I cook a lot and I know over time wear and tear and splatter can affect the look of a range. And a good cleaning regime is important too. But I find reducing splatter (with a cover etc) goes a long way in the cleaning maintenance department. And with the new range I've found cooking with deep sided cookware helps keep the splatter off the range top. I have what I'd call a mid sized copper clad stock pot that does well with the splatter management, but it's not the best. I find it's doesn't brown or saute very well (likely because of its material and construction - cheap price point), and it's not wide or big enough for doing a half pound of bacon. I'd like something better, and bigger. Something that will function like a fry pan that I can brown and deglaze in, but also has deep sides. What style of cookware would make a good fry pan that has deep sides? Should I be looking at a quality dutch oven? Or a quality large and wide stock pot?

Nov 19, 2013
b.mac in Cookware
1

Issues seasoning De Buyer Mineral B

I'm having issues getting a good seasoning to coat to my DB Mineral B. I've have so far attempted twice to season the pan with food grade flax seed oil in the oven with multiple sessions at 500F. Doing so on the first round (of maybe 8 sessions) caused my 10 year old Kitchenaid Superba gas range to finally toast parts of the circuit board or connectors, forcing me to get a new GE Monogram all gas range. That round of season just didn't work out. I might have put the first couple of coats on a micro meter too thick. So I removed the seasoning with oven cleaner and stainless steel wool. And popped it back in the new Monogram with attention to detail on the flax seed oil coating for 6 sessions. And then I did a couple of extra on the burner top.

The issue is this. I'll heat the pan up nice and hot and then add some olive oil and cook up something like eggs. And it sticks. Moderately. Then I'll clean it up using a sponge or even coarse salt, and the seasoning layer starts to erode off pretty much right away. After all the effort and attention I've put in to this, I'm about ready to bail on the DB pans and try something else.

Nov 19, 2013
b.mac in Cookware

Foodie maps

Yes, I found the blog yesterday and the maps. It's very nice. Soup had posted once on chowhounds that the blog has maps and I found it in a search.

There is also another map that isn't posted on the blog but can be found by looking at the user "Julot" on Google. The map is called Ze Favs. Must be a secret map! Also like how the Starred Restaurants map was done with 2 collaborateurs. And thanks for sharing your map. Lots of points on it. And your apartment location looks great. I have started my own map and the first thing I put on it was my apartment. I have been trying to find a way to import other maps easily but it's not. Even doing an overlay with mine and others doesn't seem to work.

Nov 07, 2010
b.mac in France

Foodie maps

That is an impressive map and kudos to the maker. Along the lines of what I'm looking for with different types of food establishments color coded on a map. Love to see something like this but an enhanced foodie only version from chowhounder members with different color pins for bistro, restaurant, fast food or takeout. And lunch and dinner versions maybe. And markets and stores. Wine stores. And some sort of rank or rating based on chowhound reviews. Ya, that would be pretty nice.

Nov 07, 2010
b.mac in France

Foodie maps

Thank you John. Sorry about the spelling of your last name in the original post. A lapse in my mental and visual focus was the reason.

It's interesting that the chowhound site has resto reviews, and integration with google maps too, but there aren't not a lot of reviews, making the feature useless. And there aren't many, maybe only two, chowhound based public google maps that I could find. Too bad as that seems like it could be a really high tech effective tool.

Nov 07, 2010
b.mac in France

Paris - suggestions for excellant dining-in meals

I was slightly shocked about the comments about why visit Paris under these conditions. It seems harsh at first, but I did say in my original post that I am looking for memorable food experiences in Paris so this seems fair. And the way this thread has gone is actually the kind of direction and content I was hoping for. Ptipois, you really provide some great advice and get to the point, as does Parigi (not too difficult to ID as Americana in Parigi on ST - very savvy one) and all the others who suggest shopping suggestions and meal planning strategies.

It sounds like to do this right (memorable and well budgeted) I need a plan for different types of situations.

Home cooking - simple to cook using good market ingredients. Avoid unreliable and expensive take out meals (advice taken -- thank you for steering me right). I can find a way to manage that even though it might take a bit out of time from our days and requires recipe planning. I love to cook so this could make for some fond memories from the shopping to the cooking to the eating.

Dining out - Bistro and other affordable options across the city. Should be easy enough to come up with options, and it's fun to plan. I do want this to be something that makes me really feel like when I was in Paris I dined in places that can't be found any where else and the food and atmosphere and service was special. I see doing this a couple of times, and would do it more often if the budget allows. I realize lunch fixed menu's are the way to go. And I also now realize there are some affordable possibilities that will be cheaper than gourmet products bought from the high end stores in St Germain.

Dining out - to go places like falafals, Vietnamese subs etc. A backup when the day is busy and we're not near the apartment and didn't pack a lunch. Just another list of options to compile.

And finally, and not least, picnics - I have read statements from people have very fond memories of picnics, sometimes the fondest of all. I'd like to plan many picnics. From lunch while touring during the day to night time dinner picnics along the Seine near Notre Dame, Eiffel Tower etc. To me this sounds more attractive than any of the other scenarios, except for bistro and restaurants. With the right food (I'd splurge a bit for this) and locations, the idea of it sounds really enticing. I'm already researching places to picnic, supplies to bring from home etc.

Nov 07, 2010
b.mac in France

Foodie maps

I would love to find maps that show recommended eating establishments for Paris, Nice, Provence and in Italy - Rome, Venice and Florence. The idea is to have an effective and fast way of looking up places to eat lunch (or dinner on occasion) when touring around destinations on the days where an itinerary wasn't pre-planned, or when plans have changed. And by recommend eating establishments, I use the term loosely because its subjective. But at least a recommendation is a place to start. And if the maps had a legend or search filtering by different criteria such as price, open days and hours, eat in or take out etc that would be a bonus. And it's really lunch establishments that I'd like this for. I wont' be eating out dinner much and whenever we do, I would use a more traditional method of searching the archives here.

I know that John Talbot's blog has a blog entry filtering by Paris arrondisements which isn't a map but simply does what I'm looking for.

And I imagine most guide books provide this feature too.

But I'd love to see a blog or website that has integrated foodie lunch establishments on a map. Karen Brown's website provides this ability for accommodation.

Or I was wondering if anyone has been kind enough to have created personal google maps that are shareable.

Nov 06, 2010
b.mac in France

Paris - suggestions for excellant dining-in meals

Kevin didn't have the right accommodation for my family at the period we will be there. He recommended another BB who's owners he is friends with. He was very adamant the BB itself and the owners will not disappoint. It's not an old house which means less charm, but there plenty of upside. I will be interested to see how it goes. Bartavelle terrasse looks classy and charming... thank you.

Nov 05, 2010
b.mac in France

Paris - suggestions for excellant dining-in meals

Thank you for informing me about Monoprix. Slightly cheaper for the same stuff and close location is perfect. I need to scope out some bakeries and cafes too. I think the apartment owners can help with that but will search the archives too.

Nov 05, 2010
b.mac in France

Paris - suggestions for excellant dining-in meals

We are staying just outside Saint Saturnin les Apt at a BB. I have lots of restaurant rec's for the area. And the owners also offer table d'hôte dining for 24 euros per person. And I hope they have some recommendations for foodie shopping in Saint Saturnin les Apt and bakery and cafes too. What I don't have yet is a restaurant rec for Cassis (or maybe surrounding area like Bandol). We'll be spending a full day in Cassis as one day trip.

Nov 05, 2010
b.mac in France

Paris - suggestions for excellant dining-in meals

Thank you both. Searching on Grand Epicerie resulted in a hit on a similar thread.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7291...

And Spring Boutique sounds promising.

Sure have lots to work with now.

Nov 05, 2010
b.mac in France

Paris - suggestions for excellant dining-in meals

Our family of four will be staying in Paris (St Germain -- rue du Vieux Colombier) in an apartment for a week. We have brought up our children, now teenagers, to appreciate fine food. More by home cooking than fine dining to be honest. We all appreciate great food. And I would love for us to be able to eat great local cuisine every meal and have a very memorable foodie experience.

Paris will be our final destination of a 4 week Europe trip. We are renting apartments where possible on this trip, except for southern France (Nice and the Luberon) where we will be in BBs. I expect to dine out more in southern France because we will not have a kitchen and we will budget for that. But sadly the Paris budget will be constrained and I don’t plan on being able to frequent many restaurants/bistros. Realistically, we will likely eat lunch out quite a bit while touring Paris, and I know there are many threads here with valuable information that I will be reading. For dinner, the apartment location makes it easy to return to for a rest, freshen up, dine and then out again in the evening.

My goal seems impossible, but maybe not. I would like to eat as well as a meal in great restaurant but by dining in, not out. But I don’t want to cook! I do love to cook and we will have a well equipped kitchen, but I don’t want to spend the time cooking because I would rather be out and about as much as possible.

So I am hoping for some suggestions please. Idea’s for menu planning. Shopping. Markets. Close to rue du Vieux Colombier. I suspect how I might accomplish this in Paris would be different compared to what I would do at home and I’d love to get some insider tips. All I know at this point is there are going to be plenty of great places to purchase food that might make up a picnic lunch or appetizers. Cheese and meats. And I can get fresh produce for salads and those are easy enough to make in the apartment. But it would be nice to have some hot meal entrees that don’t require much cooking effort. Pasta and sauce seems like an easy choice, but that seems to be too much like what I’d do at home, and not very Parisian either. Another option I thought of is getting hot entrée’s to-go from a bistro, if that is possible. And I should add I could splurge on these meals. Feeding a family of four on 50 euros should result in a great meal at a fraction of what it would cost in a restaurant.

I have to admit I have not searched the boards for threads on this subject specifically. I have read a lot of restaurant threads. People’s lists to critique are great reads. And I know about some of the blogs on restaurants, such as Mr. Talbots (which I will use to select on restaurant dinner meal on the left bank and also places for lunch). If anyone knows of a posts/threads that cover my subject, please let me know.

Nov 05, 2010
b.mac in France