TheKitchenHotline's Profile

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Red Flannel Hash

This sounds like a terrific hash.

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

CHOW Veggie Burger

Oh no another veggie burger!! What? There's no tofu? OK I'll give it a try.

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Tofu and Broccolini Pad See Ew

I knew it was coming - someone trying to convince me that tofu is food. I'd rather drop dead of a heart attack at 50 than to ever suffer through another tofu dish.

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Root Vegetable Shepherd's Pie

This might be okay but I eat Shepard's Pie because I like the taste of lamb.

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Mushroom and Chile Tacos

This sounds like a great dish as well.

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Vegetarian Muffuletta

This could actually be good. The olive salad really is the star of any Muffuletta.

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Warm Spinach Salad with Smoky Pecans and Sweet Potato

I bet some crispy bacon bits would make this dish sing!

Jan 03, 2011
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Devils on Horseback

A classic.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Black Pepper–Manchego Cheese Puffs

These sound sinful. I'm in.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Lamb Meatballs with Lemon-Cumin Yogurt

These really do sound amazing.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

What Are Your Traditional Christmas Foods?

Mine? Fried quail with biscuits and gravy.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

Whipped Feta with Sweet and Hot Peppers

When I first read the title of the rice I thought, "huh."

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Pineapple-Braised Pork Sandwiches

These sound good. Who doesn't love a good slider. Be careful not to use too much pineapple juice as it contains components they break down muscle fiber and can make any protein turn into an unappetizing goo.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Grilled Maple-Mustard Chicken Wings

I never would have thought of the flavor combo on wings but reading it I want to try it.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Pimiento Cheese Spread

Neat variation. I make mind with sharp cheddar, mayo, pimentos (duh), finely diced fresh jalapenos and of course salt & pepper. Makes an amazing grilled cheese sandwich.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Steamed Vegetable Dumplings (Zhēngjiǎo)

These sound delightful all though I think I'll skip the tofu because, well, it's tofu.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Baba Ghanoush

I love a good Baba Ghanoush recipe. I think this one qualifies.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Natchitoches Meat Pies

Donald Link is an amazing chef. No doubt this recipe will be a winner.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Spiced Candied Pecans

Nice recipe. Wintzel's Oyster House in Mobile, AL has a fried oyster salad that has sweet and spicy pecans in it made by glazing roasted pecans with a golden syrup/tabasco mixture. The pecans are addictive.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Momofuku Chicken Wings

These sound yummy. I do an Asian hot wing that our customers love. I bake the wings and toss them in a sauce made with a touch of toasted sesame oil, canola oil, crushed garlic and sriracha sauce. Amazing.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Baked Ricotta

This sounds like a winner!

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

Chicken Empanadas

Empanadas are a part of most Latin American cuisines. In fact virtually all cultures have some sort of meat pie. England has the pot pie, Jamaican meat pie, Italy has the calzone and is Asian there are any number of won tons and pot stickers.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Recipes

The Last Kodachrome Christmas

Very neat.

Dec 20, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

Turducken -- Good or just a novelty.

I love Turduken! I live fairly close to the area where it originated so I've known about and enjoyed turdukens for about 20 years now. When we first started getting them it went further than just three different birds; there were three different stuffings as well - oyster dressing, traditional cornbread dressing and then a dressing chock full of andouille sausage. You actually got five different proteins that way. But as the commercial success of the turduken has increased you don't see the three dressings any more unless you order directly from Paul Prudhomme (the inventor - same guy who came up with the blackening technique). And the other part of the original turdukens is that they were not roasted but smoked for 24 hours. Unless you are in or near Cajun country you have probably never had real turduken but rather some assembly-line knock off.

Cooking with Apple Cider

I love using apple cider when cooking pork. I add a little brown sugar and make a baste for BBQ ribs or butts. It is a must for making BBQ sauce from scratch. It's magical stuff.

Dec 10, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

Light and Crispy Onion Rings

Marinating in milk or as mentioned above with buttermilk will remove some of the pungency of the onion. Another fried onion that is good on sandwiches or on top of steaks in tabacco onions. I don't know where the name comes from but the gist is onions cut into 1" strips lightly dusted in highly seasoned flour (very spicy) and fried until crispy.

Dec 10, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

Parsnips Are Not White Carrots

I've used parsnips in stews before but I have never really explored their potential. To the market!

Dec 10, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

Christmas Tamales from All Over Latin America

Here you go:
Beef Tamales

Ingredients

* 4 pounds boneless chuck roast
* 4 cloves garlic
* 3 (8 ounce) packages dried corn husks
* 4 dried ancho chiles
* 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
* 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
* 1 cup beef broth
* 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
* 1 teaspoon ground cumin
* 2 cloves garlic, minced
* 2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano
* 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
* 1 teaspoon white vinegar
* salt to taste
* 3 cups lard
* 1 tablespoon salt
* 9 cups masa harina

Directions

1. Place beef and garlic in a large pot. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. As soon as water boils, reduce heat to a simmer and cover pot. Let simmer for 3 1/2 hours, until beef is tender and shreds easily. When beef is done, remove from pot, reserving 5 cups cooking liquid and discarding garlic. Allow meat to cool slightly, and shred finely with forks.
2. Meanwhile, place corn husks in a large container and cover with warm water. Allow to soak for 3 hours, until soft and pliable. May need to weight down with an inverted plate and a heavy can.
3. Toast ancho chiles in a cast iron skillet, making sure not to burn them. Allow to cool and then remove stems and seeds. Crumble and grind in a clean coffee grinder or with a mortar and pestle.
4. Heat oil in a large skillet. Mix in flour and allow to brown slightly. Pour in 1 cup beef broth and stir until smooth. Mix in ground chiles, cumin seeds, ground cumin, minced garlic, oregano, red pepper flakes, vinegar and salt. Stir shredded beef into skillet and cover. Let simmer 45 minutes.
5. Place lard and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whip with an electric mixer on high speed until fluffy. Add masa harina and beat at low speed until well mixed. Pour in reserved cooking liquid a little at a time until mixture is the consistency of soft cookie dough.
6. Drain water from corn husks. One at a time, flatten out each husk, with the narrow end facing you, and spread approximately 2 tablespoons masa mixture onto the top 2/3 of the husk. Spread about 1 tablespoon of meat mixture down the middle of the masa. Roll up the corn husk starting at one of the long sides. Fold the narrow end of the husk onto the rolled tamale and tie with a piece of butchers' twine.
7. Place tamales in a steamer basket. Steam over boiling water for approximately one hour, until masa is firm and holds its shape. Make sure steamer does not run out of water. Serve immediately, allowing each person to unwrap their own tamales. Allow any leftovers (still in husks) to cool, uncovered, in the refrigerator.

Dec 10, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

The Gateway Mushrooms

Not a problem for me. I love mushrooms. An important note. Mushrooms actually have to be heated (cooked) to have nutritional value. Their vitamins are locked by an amino acid and cannot be absorbed by the body but heating the mushrooms even for just a short time will break that amino acid that locks them releasing them. Incidentally raw spinach has the same issue, raw it is not nutritious but it goes even farther. Not only will the nutritional value of the spinach not be absorbed but it blocks the body from absorbing the nutrients from anything you consume with the raw spinach. The fix with this is similar either heat the spinach or you can "chemically cook" it by adding acidic foods to it like tomatoes or citrus.

Dec 10, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features

Ruth Bourdain to Write Column for CHOW.com

This ought to be good.

Dec 06, 2010
TheKitchenHotline in Features