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Working Man's Brews

We're not the target audience, friends. This isn't supposed to make sense to you.

Apr 16, 2012
frosti in Features

Nobody Owes You a Lunch Break

Agreed, Ruth, I call bullshit on this. Nothing's more frustrating that waiting for that break in the traffic to take your break. Psychological torture it is.

Apr 12, 2012
frosti in Features

USDA's Defense of Pink Slime Makes Us Gag

Connective tissue is an essential component of beefy goodness. I just hope that this product has the fat it needs to stay moist through the requisite slow cooking process

Mar 21, 2012
frosti in Features

Rush Limbaugh: Tracie McMillan Is a Food Justice Slut

Limbaugh only has power if you believe in him

Mar 06, 2012
frosti in Features

No Drinks = Bad Service

Meh, it's reasons like this that I don't eat out often. As nice as it is to sample professionally prepared dishes from ingredients that I might not have around the house, I hate to feel like my presence is resented. If you can find a way to run a business that sells affordable food, which I won't be resented-against for taking advantage of, I'll be a customer. Otherwise, you'll have to wait until I strike it rich (or at least not destitute)

Feb 21, 2012
frosti in Features

Cheap cuts in Montreal - Plateau

Cool, I'll check those places out when I'm in that part of town. I've gone to Alim Pot, Sekaris, Supermarche PA and Segal's - Supermarche PA had some interesting stuff like fresh cow brain, but I had my best luck at Alim Pot, where I found beef bones for $1/kg and a couple good cheap beef cuts. Score.

Feb 12, 2012
frosti in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Cheap cuts in Montreal - Plateau

Thanks guys, these all sound like great leads.

Feb 06, 2012
frosti in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Cheap cuts in Montreal - Plateau

Hey all,

Since I moved to Montreal a month ago, I've been looking for an equivalent to Toronto's St. Lawrence market, which is to say a place where old-fashioned butchers break down whole carcasses, letting the laws of supply and demand work in my favour. I'm looking for stewing cuts and stock bones right now, but I'd be interested in experimenting with offal as well.

So far I've been to the Atwater and Jean-Talon markets, but both were selling premium cuts in suspiciously sterile environments (especially Atwater). Supermarkets also deal in the expensive (or overpriced) stuff, and I have yet to find a local butcher shop that has what I'm looking for.

For reference, at the St. Lawrence market, I was able to get a kilo of soup bones for a dollar, and I'd like to get my cheap cuts of meat for around 7$ a kilo (3-4$ a pound).

Any suggestions?

Feb 06, 2012
frosti in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Chick-fil-A Gets Slimy About Kale

It's not that this is a uniquely christian move

It's just that being christian hardly precludes this sort of behaviour.

Denominational christianity espouses denominational christian values, which are not necessarily prosocial in nature.

Dec 01, 2011
frosti in Features

Chick-fil-A Gets Slimy About Kale

Good christian company also equals republican, which also equals exploiting capitalism and related laws to their fullest extent.

Nov 30, 2011
frosti in Features

Chicken Pot Pie - Thigh Prep

Here's how it went down:

- Chicken thighs, pat-dried and seasoned, seared in a pan, then set aside to cool while
- a big finely chopped onion was added to the pan, along with cubed carrots and a small hot thai chilli
- Onions cooked 'till soft, at which point,
- garlic and rosemary were added, and cooked briefly before
- the chicken, skin and bone removed (skin set aside, bones thrown into a stock pot), was thrown back in the skillet, with a cup and a half of beef bone stock.
- Once simmering, flour was added to thicken

Ten minutes of simmering

- Add salt, pepper, peas and a couple dashes of white wine vinegar - lay rolled puff pastry over the skillet to cover

Throw the whole mess into a 375F oven to bake for 25 minutes

Remove and serve an utterly delicious, if slightly soupy chicken pot pie, along with the skin which had been finishing on a sheet pan in the oven

For dessert, eat the puff pastry scraps brushed with butter, dusted with cinnamon and sugar, laminated and baked

Nobody knew the stock came from a cow

Again, thanks for the advice all

May 26, 2011
frosti in Home Cooking

Chicken Pot Pie - Thigh Prep

Thanks for the replies all - I think I have a good handle on this now

Cheers

May 26, 2011
frosti in Home Cooking

Chicken Pot Pie - Thigh Prep

Regardless of what I do with the skin and bones, is it not true that once chicken has been cooked past a certain point, that it will only become more tender (as long as it's immersed in liquid)?

With a dish like boeuf bourguignon, from a beef tenderness standpoint, it doesn't seem to matter if you cook it for three hours or six - the tissue has already broken down.

My impression chicken would probably go like this:
Refrigerator - tender but inedible
160F - relatively tender, edible
180F - getting tough
hold at 180F in liquid for a couple hours:
tissue breaking down, tender again
hold at 180F for another eight hours
tissue broken down to mush - unpalatable

If this is true, then would I not be well advised to make sure that the chicken has stewed to tenderness before popping it in the oven to bake the crust? Otherwise, if I put the pies in the oven with the chicken raw or lightly cooked, it would seem that I would risk the final product coming out at a point in the cooking process where the meat has overshot the optimal 160F, and not cooked long enough to re-tenderized.

May 26, 2011
frosti in Home Cooking

Chicken Pot Pie - Thigh Prep

I was basing my procedure off of an Alton Brown reciple:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/al...

I'm thinking of using some of the gelatinous beef bone stock that I made the other day to give the gravy some heft - Maybe a mistake given the chicken, but it makes everything else so good that I thought it would be worth a try - hence not really needing all of the stock-power of the chicken bones.

Good point with the "just stew the whole thing and de-skin/bone near the end" though

May 25, 2011
frosti in Home Cooking

Chicken Pot Pie - Thigh Prep

Got a pack of skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs that'll be going in a stew-like chicken pot pie filling

What would be the most delicious way to prepare them?

The straightforward thing would be to bone and skin 'em, but then I'd be throwing away some potentially nice tastes and textures

I can't think of a way that keeping the bones in would work, so I will probably take them out

The skin, on the other hand - Would it be worthwhile to sear them crispy, then slice the meat in to bite-sized pieces capped with skin bits? Would the stew-like cooking process ruin the final texture, leaving the skin potentially gross and chewy?

If I didn't have you guys to guide me, I would sear the skin, bone in, then remove the meat from the bone, slice, and add to the stew - wagering that the "fried" skin would retain some sort of favourable quality through to the end

Advice?

May 25, 2011
frosti in Home Cooking

Two weeks in Somerset - Things to try?

Good to hear that there is some legit stuff happening in cheddar - The pamphlets I've seen for the city worried me.

I'm in the middle of the Exmoor National Park (I was working for a hotel there), and I think I'll try to make my way to Bristol soon; farmer's markets are ususally bright spots for me during my wanderings.

Mar 24, 2011
frosti in U.K./Ireland

Two weeks in Somerset - Things to try?

Looking for for some local points of interest - Any organizations or people who are doing interesting things, hopefully with a little traditional context (cheeses, ciders, charcuterie?)

Anyone familiar with the area?

P.S. - I'm backpacking, and my budget is pretty limited

Mar 23, 2011
frosti in U.K./Ireland

Behind the Scenes of the Last Kodachrome Christmas

Question: Have you tried simulate the kodachrome's characteristics in post-processing? To what degree did you succeed?

Dec 09, 2010
frosti in Features

Should New York City Take Soda Away from Poor People?

I think that banning foods outright is really a clumsy solution to a complex problem. A system that allows you to purchase a certain amount of unhealthy food every month would probably be more appropriate in the long term (but would be more complicated to implement).

Oct 21, 2010
frosti in Features

Should New York City Take Soda Away from Poor People?

Isn't the real question whether or not the government's intervention with regard to this will produce measurable benefits? I'm sure that whoever is proposing this has commissioned some sort of (hopefully well constructed) report on the projected effectiveness of this action. If it could produce a sound improvement in quality of life for some people (by reducing obesity by some fraction), wouldn't we all have to all get on board? The matter of where to draw the line would be largely arbitrary, but hopefully it would be done in such a way that would minimize inconvenience and maximize beneficial outcomes.

Oct 20, 2010
frosti in Features

Should New York City Take Soda Away from Poor People?

Yayme, Do you feel that there's a risk of somebody putting my suggestions in to action?

I meant only to offend the status quo

Oct 20, 2010
frosti in Features

Should New York City Take Soda Away from Poor People?

Freedom is an illusion anyway. Ban away! I say that we restrict food stamps to use on lentils and cabbage.

Although, With proper nutrition, maybe the poor would be better able to compete with me in the job market... FRIED CHICKEN AND FAYGO FOR EVERYBODY!

Oct 19, 2010
frosti in Features