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Real Peking Duck in Toronto

Hey CHers,

Does anyone know where to get real Peking Duck in Toronto? By real Peking Duck I mean prepped the proper way - air blown under the skin and all. The vast majority of "Peking Duck" here consists of a regular roast duck (like the ones you see at the Chinese BBQ shops) and when an order comes in hot oil is poured over it to "crisp" the skin before it is served - although still tasty, this is not what I'm seeking.

I know there's Dayali but I was hoping to find a place more central to downtown. Thanks!

When do you tip low (10% or less)

Gotcha. Still money out of your own pocket though (why punish yourself?), so I still don't get it, when you can get the message across for free by speaking with management, or heck, the server themselves.

Sep 27, 2013
MellyMelle in Not About Food
1

When do you tip low (10% or less)

I said it once below, and I'll say it again. Tip according to the level of service you received. If it's bad, tip less, and if it's great, tip more. We all work hard for our money and servers are not exempted from this principle. Ripping a bill in half is still money out of your own pocket and quite frankly all the server has to do is to tape it back together to reap the benefits.

Why is everyone so concerned about whether the server thinks you are cheap? It's a stranger, for crying out loud, who cares what they think. By the way, the best way to get the message across that the service sucked is to speak with management. Tip less, and submit a complaint...seems pretty sensible to me.

Sep 27, 2013
MellyMelle in Not About Food
1

SUKHO THAI - what's going on?

It's strange, isn't it, considering the genius behind the food is at KSR!

SUKHO THAI - what's going on?

I've been to both KSR and Sukhothai a few times now and I definitely prefer Sukhothai. I like how the Panang curry comes with veggies at Sukhothai. KSR's is just the protein with sauce. And they don't offer my favourite dish at KSR - the Pad Khee Mao...well at least it's not on the menu. Portions are definitely bigger at Sukhothai.

Hong Kong - staying for a month

Charles, I'll be in HK in a month and you need to become my food guide!! 3 days will not be enough...

looking for dai pai don in Hong Kong!

Thanks huiray!

When do you tip low (10% or less)

Are you saying that most people in the food service industry are in desperate situations, and that's why we should tip a certain minimum amount regardless? I don't buy that argument - sympathy does not get me paid in my job, and it shouldn't. In ANY job. Plus, if you rely on your tips, your motivation should be to provide great service to increase that portion of your compensation. Being a grump or not doing the job does not improve the server's situation, only makes it worse. I'm from Canada and our servers typically don't make minimum wage either, but with tips, you can make a fairly prolific living, especially when you look at required job skills/education/training vs. compensation. I don't have a problem if you choose to tip regardless, but you may want to consider what kind of message you're sending the good hard working server who is making only a few % more than a server who does the bare minimum and sometimes less.

I worked in the service industry for 6 years putting myself through school, have been a hostess, busgirl, cook, server, bartender, so it's not like I'm speaking as an armchair critic. It ain't rocket science, just takes some effort. My hourly wage as a server/bartender averaged around $5.25/hour, so it was a bit higher than what it appears to be in the US. Regardless, the tips made up the majority of my compensation.

Oct 04, 2012
MellyMelle in Not About Food

An hypothetical: tipping( again)

Yep, these are the people who reinforces bad servers to continue bad service. Where's the incentive for them to improve if they'll get tipped a certain minimum amount regardless of what they do (or don't do)? And how does that make good servers feel, when they're busting their ass only to make a couple % more than someone who doesn't give a rat's ass?

Sep 27, 2012
MellyMelle in Not About Food

When do you tip low (10% or less)

I'm surprised by all the people who tips regularly even when provided bad service. When you do this, it is just reinforcing the idea that the bad service does not need to be improved.

Sep 27, 2012
MellyMelle in Not About Food

looking for dai pai don in Hong Kong!

I'll be in Hong Kong for a measly three days in the beginning of November, and really, really want to seek out a good old school dai pai don. I understand the HK government stopped issuing permits for this type of establishment a while back and my relatives claim that they are no more, but want to check with CHers if you have more info. Grew up there and that is the #1 item on my eating wish list for this trip back! Any other suggestions are welcome too, I plan on gaining some weight :)

Will also be in Singapore on this trip, so if there's anything I must try there, please chime in!

Do you ever order less because of obnoxious upselling?

Absolutely agreed! It is upselling, just because it is common practice doesn't make it not upselling. But like many other posters said, if you don't want it just say no. If the "no" affects your service, well now that's a reason to get vexed.

Many people become more sympathetic to the service industry after having worked in it. It had the opposite effect on me. Did it while I was in university (i've been a hostess, busgirl, cook, waitress, bartender, you name it) and quite frankly it's not rocket science, it does not take a lot to provide good service. But I've worked only in bars and restaurants where management are pretty relaxed (I was never given a mandate to upsell) so perhaps that's the reason for my attitude. There are alot of undeserved criticism that are directed towards servers, but let's be honest, a lot of them are well deserved.

I often want to eat everything on a menu anyway so really it's not very hard to upsell when I'm your diner :)

Sep 27, 2012
MellyMelle in Not About Food

Kroepoek... or why is "Chinese" food different in various countries?

Hi CheukKwan, is your documentary available in stores (I'm in Toronto) or only through your site? Not saying your site does this, but I'm tired of all the junk mail that I curiously get after purchases on certain websites...

Sep 27, 2012
MellyMelle in General Topics

Get thee to Big Mouth Luck Dumpling House in Delisle Court (Yonge St. and Heath St.)

Was in the area for an appointment and found the Dumpling House, was looking for Chinese and this was the only one...I can never understand the abundance of sushi restaurants EVERYWHERE in Toronto. Must've walked by more than 6 different sushi restos in 3 blocks.

Looks like the owners are paying attention to online reviews (major +), as the dumplings now come in half dozens. Not sure how much longer the owners can hold on though, walked in at around 1:15pm and there was only 1 table of 8 inside and 2 lone diners on the patio. Had the pork, shrimp and chives boiled dumplings ($4.50 for 6), the beef and napa cabbage fried dumplings ($4 for 6), and the siu long bao (soup dumplings) ($3.99 for 5). The filling to wrap ratio was good, so they may have fixed that too. In terms of taste, nothing to write home about, but I walked away satisfied enough. Of the three, my favourite was the boiled dumplings, and don't think I would order the pan fried again, they are just much better boiled.

Everyone on yelp seems to love the chili oil, but personally, the chili oil needs a lot more kick (and I am an average in terms of the spicy tolerance meter). Forgot to say - I believe they're making their dumplings fresh to order, as the other posters noted.

Gotta try out your suggestion at Metro Square, got an appointment there next week.

Help! Repatriated Torontonian baffled by the Chinese food!

Think the OP's best bet, like many have suggested, will be small towns. Can even try Hamilton, they have quite a few Canadian Chinese restaurants there, maybe one will fill your niche.

goldbed brings up a very good point - different styles of Chinese food exist all over the world. Any type of "authentic" cuisine, when brought to a different region with different local ingredients and influences, is bound to morph into something entirely its own. Recently I visited Australia and Hong Kong, had Chinese food in both, and they were definitely different. Having grown up in Hong Kong, I went on an eating frenzy while there, as like the OP, I was chasing the "good old days" :)

Good luck with the hunt, and do consider the advice to seek out the great authentic spots (don't bother with downtown, go to Richmond Hill, Markham or Scarborough), you and your family may just be surprised.