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Chicken Ballotine - roasting recommendations

I don't see any reason why that wouldn't be just fine. Sounds like a good idea.

about 19 hours ago
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

April 2012 COTM: Melissa Clark Month, Cook This Now: Winter

I don't think it could sit very long without turning somewhat solid, unless you had a very warm spot for it. I'd probably go ahead and make it and put it in the microwave very briefly at the last minute, just to make certain it's all melty again. I'm certain, however, that's pretty unorthodox.

Dec 22, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Voting thread: Cookbook of the Month January 2015

I bet you're right! Last time we bought it, I think we put one package in the freezer for later use, so I just remember thawing it! I do think that cooking it a bit more is necessary, for most uses.

Dec 22, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Voting thread: Cookbook of the Month January 2015

Do you happen to have a Trader Joe's near you? They sell frozen pork belly now. Is the black fungus called for dried? If so you can probably get it online. I usually buy more than I need when I'm in an Asian store, and it keeps fine.

And I don't mean here to be pushing for Hakka, as I don't have access to either book, just some ideas about ingredients if that is the book that wins.

Dec 21, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Bellingham: First (and last?) trip to Cliff House

I pretty much share your opinion, Laura. I had a sazerac there that was warm, in a warm glass, and had an insect in it. Had a decent one there on the prior visit, it depends upon the bartender. I think that soup tastes more like a cornstarch slurry than crab or whiskey. Yup, nice view.

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 9-12

Shrimp Baked with Feta Cheese, Greek Style, page 397.

This is an easy weeknight dish. Actually, I made it last night, and it's an easy weekend dish too. It's meant to be an appetizer, I served it as the main course.

The recipe calls for cooking the dish in two pans, and baking it in separate serving dishes, I only used one pan, and I baked it in a single cazuela. I cooked the shrimp in the butter first (just barely cooked, less than a minute, as they will also bake in the oven), set them aside, and cooked the tomatoes in the same pan. Along with garlic, the tomatoes are enhanced with oregano, red pepper flakes, and capers. I omitted the small amount of fish broth called for, and just didn't reduce the tomatoes quite as much.

The tomatoes are layered with the buttery shrimp, topped with feta, and baked for 10 to 15 minutes. When serving, ouzo is drizzled over and ignited.

I preferred this dish over the similar one in The Olive and the Caper. Perhaps it was because this one contained capers, one of my favorite foods. Or perhaps it was the theater of lighting the ouzo. Either way, it was quick, easy, and tasty.

Voting thread: Cookbook of the Month January 2015

Thanks Caitlin, please don't trouble yourself! I didn't find anything the first time around except some videos for Hakka, and I know I'll never watch a video. Maybe my google-fu is not what it once was! I will google again.

Dec 20, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Chicken Ballotine - roasting recommendations

Well, fldhkybnva would need a pretty large water bath to sous vide a whole chicken.

Dec 20, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Voting thread: Cookbook of the Month January 2015

Has anyone found online recipes (not YouTube videos, please) for either of these books? As it turns out, unlike November and December, I may actually have some time for cooking in January. But I own neither of these books, nor does my library, and I don't find any online recipes.

Dec 20, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Chicken Ballotine - roasting recommendations

Just FYI, a couple posts down I reported on the same recipe, but lined the chicken with bacon before stuffing. This was a great addition. There is also a helpful note from GretchenS a bit downstream, mentioning brushing the skin with olive oil to facilitate browning.
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8259...

Dec 20, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

Chicken Ballotine - roasting recommendations

To second chefj's recommendation: We've made Jacques Pepin's Chicken Ballottine three times, twice using 3 1/2 - 4 lb chicken (pre-deboning wt), stuffed with spinach, gruyere, garlic, and bread cubes. It has come out perfectly cooked at 400º for about an hour.

Hmm. Turns out I actually wrote it up here, the one time with a smaller chicken, so the cooking time was probably a bit off in this instance:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8259...

Instructions for how to avoid reading threads page by page & viewing already read comments

Yes, I am aware of that thread, and I've posted there a couple times also. Just thought I'd comment here on the fact that someone (who doesn't appear to be staff or moderator) is trying to explain the ridiculous procedure for getting back to the normal, expedient, method of operation. (Which is actually not working as well as it did just a few days ago).

This thread will probably be locked soon anyway.

Instructions for how to avoid reading threads page by page & viewing already read comments

And this thing at the bottom of every page? Suggesting there are more pages or an "all" to see? People are going to think they are missing something when there are page numbers and an option to "see all" in black print, that doesn't do anything. Yes, we know we're not missing anything, but only because we've read the hundreds of posts explaining it. Someone who dropped in isn't going to get that.

Dec 19, 2014
L.Nightshade in Site Talk
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Instructions for how to avoid reading threads page by page & viewing already read comments

So no one thinks there is something inherently wrong with oblique instructions that you have to find by navigating away from the boards about food? And that EM23 is providing this instruction, and not the CH PTB in a readily accessible fashion? Not to mention that the majority of experienced hounds don't even know to visit Site Talk, let alone the newbies.

So the "fix" to make thread open more quickly, only works if you're using the pagination function. Then your thread opens quickly, and you spend ten times as much time searching for the first unread post. Ultimately, everyone frustrated by that will either dump chowhound, or learn how to revert to the old style of collapsed posts, and back to the (marginally slower) opening speed. So what exactly did this accomplish?

PS, a side note, I can no longer expand the text box to see what I've written. When did that happen?

Dec 19, 2014
L.Nightshade in Site Talk
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A Faster Chowhound: Pagination for Longer Threads

"Choosing to turn on the “read state” option will default you to the “See All” page on all threads, which presents a single-page version of all comments without pagination (exactly as you see the site today). You won't get the benefit of faster page loads on individual threads on the “See All” page, but you can always click within the paginator at the bottom of the thread to view individual pages at any time."

Have you gone nuts? I work on the computer 9 or 10 hours a day. This was my playground. I'm not going to work here.

A Faster Chowhound: Pagination for Longer Threads

Ugh. This is awful. Is this why every page is opening fully expanded? I am completely unable to find the last post in threads I've been following, in COTM, for example, following for years. The Essential NYT Cookbook is being revisited from the 2011 COTM. Some of the threads have over 200 or 400 posts. How the hell can I find the one dinky new post in that thread when everything is expanded? Clicking on the number of posts used to bring me to the most recent. I can no longer find the most recent post.

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 15-18

I think he is married to Amanda. Because the original recipe is by Elizabeth Friend, Amanda's mother-in-law.

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 15-18

I'm cracking up. Yes, I know it's bizarre. I do like to taste champagne on occasion, but I just don't like, or rather don't tolerate, more than a sip of anything with bubbles. I can't explain the fried chicken thing.

Dec 16, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking
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B-ham disappointments

In response to your La Gloria question...
It used to be our go-to for burritos and takeout. The same woman was almost always cooking. She doesn't seem to be cooking now, at least not when we've been, and it's definitely gone downhill. The flavors just aren't there anymore. We might give it one more shot, and I still like the market. But it's sad.

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 1-4

Anchovy Canapés, page 51.

This couldn't be easier. And while it's not an impressive presentation, it packs a lot of flavor. Ms Hesser points out that she took liberties with rewriting the recipe, as it originally called for frying stale bread in lard. This version calls simply for toasting country bread (see how easy?), spreading it with a blend of three parts softened unsalted butter, and one part anchovy paste, spreading it on the toasts, and serving with thin slices of Roquefort cheese. I don't have anchovy paste (since I buy anchovies in bulk, it seems kind of stupid to also buy paste), so I smooshed up whole filleted chovies then blended them with the butter, keeping the correct proportion. Spread this on the country bread toast halves, and topped with the cheese. From the wording, I wasn't certain whether the cheese was meant to be served atop the anchovy toasts, or alongside. I took the word canapé as my queue, and topped the toasts with the cheese.

Salty (good if your'e in the mood for salty), and pungent flavors. We loved these little toasts. You could even make them elegant by cutting the bread properly, and topping them with a sprig of something. I didn't . I just went for quick and tasty, and in that, I succeeded.

By the way, the original recipe, published in 1882, suggested a tame otter as the main dish. I think I'll just choose to forget that I ever read that.

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 1-4

Very intriguing; I'll have to try it to know. I can't really imagine the taste combination!
I adore your glasses, but every time I see this photo, I'm afraid they're about to tip over! The little bases must be very heavy. Lovely.

Dec 15, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking
1

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 15-18

Another recipe to throw into the mix for chocolate-bourbon-pecan lovers: A chocolate bourbon pecan pie that I've made a few times, to raves from some pretty food-critical friends. Lisa Dupar's Fried Chicken and Champagne came up as a COTM suggestion a while ago, and even though I like neither fried chicken or champagne, the modern-Southern-style recipes in this book intrigued me.

http://www.duparandcompany.com/blog/2...

Dec 15, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 15-18

You are so lucky to know her, and to have that experience. It makes me a bit sad, the changes you mentioned, but makes your history with her all the more valuable. Thanks so much for sharing her with with us!

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 15-18

Ugh, sorry. I won't be trying this one, thanks for taking the hit. Love your story about your Aunt Anne! What a great experience.

November 2014 Cookbook of the Month, "The Soul of a New Cuisine", reporting thread for: Spice Blends; Condiments; and Desserts

Chocolate-Coconut Sorbet with Peanut Butter, page 312.

Coconut milk is heated with water, white sugar, brown sugar, fresh ginger, vanilla bean seeds, and the pod. After a five minute simmer, two cups (!) of cocoa powder are stirred in, and the mixture simmers again for two minutes. The vanilla pod and the ginger are discarded and the mixture cools in a bowl in the refrigerator for two hours. Then it goes into the ice cream maker.

For the peanut butter, roasted peanuts, sugar, salt are blended in the FP, and a little peanut oil is added to get it to the desired consistency. Mine ended up being more of a drizzle than a dollop, which made it easier to get a bit of peanut taste in each bite.

I love this dessert, and it's a great one to keep in mind if you're serving diners who don't eat dairy. Coconut is a wonderful flavor to pair with chocolate, and the ginger lends an unusual note. I've made this twice now, the first time I didn't freeze the ice cream maker canister long enough, and we had chocolate soup. The second time I forgot to take a picture, so dished up a fresh bowl but the sorbet was partially melted by the time I remembered. So it still looks a little soupier than when it was served.

Anyway, it's a lovely dessert, and I'd like to try more recipes using coconut milk instead of milk or cream.

Dec 07, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 9-12

I like your idea of sun-dried tomatoes with this. Maybe even Batali's tomato raisins would work. This one might need a revisit from me.

Dec 07, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking
1

What Holiday Food Gifts Are You Making?

I'm very interested in your goat cheese and basil scones. Do you have a recipe to which you can point me? And do you happen to know if they freeze well? Not critical that they freeze well for gifting, just curious for my own personal consumption!
And yes, I realize I'm responding to a year-old post, but hopefully monsterbeans is still around.

Dec 06, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 9-12

Now I'm conflicted! I was planning on making this dish tomorrow, so I took a scan here to see if anyone had tried it. I do love the coffee and chiles idea, but I have a short rib recipe that's 100% perfect, and this one sounds a bit flawed. Hmm, maybe the ENYT is not in the cards for me tomorrow.

Dec 05, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 9-12

I wish I could "tag" someone here so they could see a post! I learned from Breadcrumbs to always bake meatballs, on parchment paper. It's been a very successful method for me. There was once a recipe mention of using a pan with higher sides to retain more moisture, but I've never had and issue with dryness.

Dec 04, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking
1

December 2014 & February 2011 Cookbook of the Month: THE ESSENTIAL NEW YORK TIMES COOKBOOK Chapters 9-12

Have you ever seen this list of same-type fish substitutes? I use it quite a bit for COTM recipes where I can't get the mentioned fish.
http://www.cookinglight.com/cooking-1...

Dec 03, 2014
L.Nightshade in Home Cooking
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