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August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

I think I am with you on that comparative assessment. This was similar to the MH samfaina, but not cooked as long, not as sweet, and not quite as amazing. But still very enjoyable and yet another argument for long-cooked vegetables.

about 7 hours ago
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

ZUCCHINI, BELL PEPPER, AND ONION JAM (PISTO) - p. 29, TNST

This recipe was perfect for my CSA box. It is reminiscent of samfaina, which I fell in love with back when The Mediterranean Harvest was COTM. A long, slow cook seemed like a good way to get the most flavor out of some of the vegetables in my box that were less than ideal. I had an oversized squash which I used in place of the two zucchini called for in this recipe. I had the red bell pepper, and I used a purple bell pepper in place of the green called for (the flavor is similar, and if anything, the purple ones taste worse - I don't know why people grow them, and my CSA seems inordinately fond of them).

For the recipe, onion gets sautéed, then the squash, pepper, and garlic are added and cooked until soft. Some grated ripe tomatoes then go in, and the whole thing cooks for a long, long time until it's mush. The pisto gets seasoned with vinegar, sugar, salt, and black pepper, and is served at room temperature. I served it as a spread on toast points.

The long cooking worked it's magic on the vegetables, making them very sweet and intensely flavored. The spread was delicious. I'm thrilled to have made another dent in my CSA box and found a way to make some of the veggies I was less than thrilled about taste fantastic. A big win!

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

CRISP POTATOES WITH SPICY TOMATO SAUCE (PATATAS BRAVAS) - p. 69, TNST

This is one of my favorite tapas, and the picture in TNST just drew me right to it. Ms. von Bremzen uses small red-skinned potatoes in her version, which she boils then tosses with olive oil and salt, and crisps in a 475 degree oven. I used even smaller purple potatoes, because that's what I had from my CSA, and followed her technique but shortened the cooking time a bit because mine were so small.

To go with the potatoes, you have the spicy tomato sauce on p. 71. Onion and garlic are sautéed, then seasoned with smoked paprika, cumin, and red pepper flakes. A can of tomatoes gets added, along with some water, and this sauce gets cooked down for about 20 minutes. The sauce is then seasoned with white vinegar, sugar, salt, and Tabasco (I used another brand). She doesn't say how much hot sauce to put in there, but I was pretty liberal with it. The sauce gets puréed in a blender, and then the seasoning is adjusted. The sauce is served at room temperature.

The other accompaniment to the potatoes is an allioli - she says to use any of the ones on pp. 44-45, and I took the easy route and made the "Mock Allioli" on p. 45. This one starts with storebought mayonnaise (I used Just Mayo), and you simply whisk in some garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. The allioli is supposed to be thinned with a bit of water before serving with the potatoes, but I overlooked that step.

This tapa did not disappoint! You've got a nice contrast between the spicy and acidic tomato sauce and the rich and garlicky allioli. The boil-then-bake technique for the potatoes worked great, and they had a nice crisp crust. The dish would probably be even better made with a waxier potato, and certainly prettier with a lighter colored potato, but we thoroughly enjoyed this version.

What cookbooks have you bought lately, or are you lusting after? Roll out those lazy crazy days of summer, July 2015 edition! [old]

Today on Bookgorilla there was African Cooking 101 (for beginners) for a whopping $0. Needless to say, I bit. Haven't looked at it yet, but African cookbooks are hard enough to come by that I'm willing to consider any that come along. For free? Why on earth not?

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

Hadn't noticed this recipe yet, but it's now on my to-do list. I find cooking the potatoes in heavily salted water gives a better texture, and pressure cooking also does the same. I'll do one of those techniques for this recipe. Heck, I wish I'd seen this earlier, because it would have been a heckuva lot easier and faster than the patatas bravas I'm making tonight.

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - SEAFOOD, POULTRY, MEAT, GAME

I'd be happy to scan those pages for you and email them to you. After all, you own the book, you should have all the pages.

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - SEAFOOD, POULTRY, MEAT, GAME

You are missing the meatball pages!

The Meatballs of Madrid Tapas Bars (Albondigas en Salsa)
Catalan Meatballs (Albondigas con Manzanas y Setas)
Minted Lamb Meatballs (Albondigas de Cordero)

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

BC, you really hit the ground running this month! What a spread!

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

GAZPACHO TODAY (El Gazpache de Hoy) - p. 73, MKIS

It's hard to think of a more summery dish than gazpacho. I've been getting abundant tomatoes, cucumbers, and green peppers from my CSA, so making gazpacho was a no-brainer for me.

The author calls this version a "modern" gazpacho, in contrast to the rustic version she gives in the recipe preceding this one. This version is made in a blender, and is a smooth purée. It starts with soaked bread, which gets blended up with some garlic. Then ripe tomatoes are added (she calls for them to be seeded, but not skinned, and I didn't even bother with seeding them). These get blended with the bread, and also a bit of green bell pepper and cucumber. There is some ground cumin and salt added for seasoning. Olive oil get slowly added with the blender running. As the oil is incorporated, the mixture turns a pale orange. Finally some water and white wine vinegar are mixed in. Some additional water is added when the soup is transferred to a tureen or pitcher. The soup is chilled before serving. Diced onion, green pepper, and cucumber are the garnishes added at the table. Or you have the option of thinning the soup a bit more, leaving off the garnishes, and serving in glasses rather than bowls. I went with the bowls and the garnishes.

I don't think I've ever met a gazpacho I didn't like, and this one is no exception. I might prefer a more rustic, textured version to this smooth one, but this version is certainly very nice.

August 2015 COTM Announcement: THE NEW SPANISH TABLE and MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN

And the reporting threads are now up!
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1020813

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
2

August 2015 COTM: THE NEW SPANISH TABLE and MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN

Welcome to August and our Spanish (virtual) vacation. This month we'll are cooking through the contemporary and the traditional through our two selections. First up, we have THE NEW SPANISH TABLE, by Anya von Bremzen. And to round out our trip, we've got MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN, by Janet Mendel.

Use this thread for general discussion. To report on the recipes you make, please use the appropriate reporting thread listed below:

TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1020808

Use this thread for the following sections of The New Spanish Table:
Tapas, pp. 18-73
Soup, pp. 75-109
Salads, pp. 110-135
Empanadas, pp. 158-183

And also for following sections in My Kitchen in Spain:
Ingredients & Procedures, pp. 6-10
Tapas, pp. 11-50
Bread, pp. 51-65
Gazpachos, Soups, and One-Pot Meals, pp. 67-111

EGG, MILK, AND CHEESE DISHES; BEANS; POTATOES; RICE; PASTA; VEGETABLES
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1020809

From The New Spanish Table:
Eggs, pp. 137-157
Beans and Potatoes, pp. 302-329
Rice and Pasta, pp. 331-365
Vegetables, pp. 366-395

From My Kitchen in Spain:
Egg, Milk, and Cheese Dishes, pp. 113-132
Vegetables, pp. 133-166
Paella and Other Rice Dishes, pp. 167-182

SEAFOOD, POULTRY, MEAT, GAME
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1020811

From The New Spanish Table:
Seafood, pp. 185-227
Meat, pp. 228-269
Poultry and Game, pp. 271-301

From My Kitchen in Spain:
Seafood, pp. 183-235
Poultry, pp. 237-254
Meat, pp. 255-284
Game, pp. 285-297

DESSERTS
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1020812

From The New Spanish Table:
Desserts, pp. 397-453

From My Kitchen in Spain:
Desserts, pp. 299-341

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - DESSERTS

Use this thread to report on recipes from The New Spanish Table and My Kitchen in Spain that fall under the category of DESSERTS

This encompasses the following chapters from each book...

From The New Spanish Table:
Desserts, pp. 397-453

From My Kitchen in Spain:
Desserts, pp. 299-341

If you are the first to report on a recipe, please start a new comment. If you are reporting on a recipe someone else has already made, please post as a reply to their comment, so all reports on one recipe are grouped together. Please put the recipe title in ALL CAPS, so it is easy to find. Since we will have recipes from more than one book on this thread, don't forget to include the title of the book in your post.

Per Chowhound rules, please do post recipes copied verbatim from the books.

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - SEAFOOD, POULTRY, MEAT, GAME

Use this thread to report on recipes from The New Spanish Table and My Kitchen in Spain that fall under the categories of SEAFOOD, POULTRY, MEAT, GAME

This encompasses the following chapters from each book...

From The New Spanish Table:
Seafood, pp. 185-227
Meat, pp. 228-269
Poultry and Game, pp. 271-301

From My Kitchen in Spain:
Seafood, pp. 183-235
Poultry, pp. 237-254
Meat, pp. 255-284
Game, pp. 285-297

If you are the first to report on a recipe, please start a new comment. If you are reporting on a recipe someone else has already made, please post as a reply to their comment, so all reports on one recipe are grouped together. Please put the recipe title in ALL CAPS, so it is easy to find. Since we will have recipes from more than one book on this thread, don't forget to include the title of the book in your post.

Per Chowhound rules, please do post recipes copied verbatim from the books.

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - EGGS, MILK, CHEESE, BEANS, POTATOES, RICE, PASTA, VEGETABLES

Use this thread to report on recipes from The New Spanish Table and My Kitchen in Spain that fall under the categories of EGG, MILK, AND CHEESE DISHES; BEANS; POTATOES; RICE; PASTA; VEGETABLES

This encompasses the following chapters from each book...

From The New Spanish Table:
Eggs, pp. 137-157
Beans and Potatoes, pp. 302-329
Rice and Pasta, pp. 331-365
Vegetables, pp. 366-395

From My Kitchen in Spain:
Egg, Milk, and Cheese Dishes, pp. 113-132
Vegetables, pp. 133-166
Paella and Other Rice Dishes, pp. 167-182

If you are the first to report on a recipe, please start a new comment. If you are reporting on a recipe someone else has already made, please post as a reply to their comment, so all reports on one recipe are grouped together. Please put the recipe title in ALL CAPS, so it is easy to find. Since we will have recipes from more than one book on this thread, don't forget to include the title of the book in your post.

Per Chowhound rules, please do post recipes copied verbatim from the books.

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

August 2015 COTM: The New Spanish Table & My Kitchen in Spain - TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

Use this thread to report on recipes from The New Spanish Table and My Kitchen in Spain that fall under the categories of TAPAS, SOUPS, GAZPACHOS, SALADS, BREADS, EMPANADAS

This encompasses the following chapters from each book...

The New Spanish Table:
Tapas, pp. 18-73
Soup, pp. 75-109
Salads, pp. 110-135
Empanadas, pp. 158-183

And also for following sections in My Kitchen in Spain:
Ingredients & Procedures, pp. 6-10
Tapas, pp. 11-50
Bread, pp. 51-65
Gazpachos, Soups, and One-Pot Meals, pp. 67-111

If you are the first to report on a recipe, please start a new comment. If you are reporting on a recipe someone else has already made, please post as a reply to their comment, so all reports on one recipe are grouped together. Please put the recipe title in ALL CAPS, so it is easy to find. Since we will have recipes from more than one book on this thread, don't forget to include the title of the book in your post.

Per Chowhound rules, please do post recipes copied verbatim from the books.

Aug 01, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

Go-to cookbooks for "must impress" dinner parties

I love that book. Clearly written with love and a true appreciation for food - no matter how simple.

August 2015 COTM Announcement: THE NEW SPANISH TABLE and MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN

Yes, please post on anything you've made!

Jul 30, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

Eating Right for Cancer Survival DVD

I haven't seen the DVD, so I won't comment directly upon it. I think as far as the healthfulness of a vegetarian or vegan diet goes, the American Dietetic Association position on it is a pretty good summary of what we know at this point in time.
http://www.andjrnl.org/article/S0002-...

There are lower rates of some cancers in vegetarians and vegans, but I don't think there have been enough studies on enough types of cancer to make broad generalizations. There may be other benefits as noted in the ADA position. But I just don't think we really have the data to say that a completely vegan diet is necessarily better than one that is high in vegetables, but contains some animal products. The most convincing health argument is that a completely plant-based diet has worked in reversing heart disease.

I think that there are compelling reasons to eat a vegetarian or vegan diet, but the most compelling are not health-based, but are based on ethics. The most obvious being the animal welfare argument, but there are also very strong environmental reasons to choose eating plants over eating animals. With that motivation, the question becomes something other than "what is the optimal diet for human health?" Which I don't think anyone has answered yet, and perhaps never will, as humans can survive and thrive on a wide variety of foods, and more a matter of whether the vegan diet can maintain health, which it clearly can.

As for cancer, even if a vegan diet gives a lower risk of some types, it is really important to realize that there is nothing you can do to bulletproof yourself against cancer. Even people who do "everything right" still get it. In my own family, my mother had breast cancer in her 50's, and is now 91 and in excellent health. My father had acute myeloid leukemia in his 80's, and passed away at 87. My brother was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma with brain metastases at age 60, and is, miraculously, still with us three years later. So I have a lot of personal experience with cancer, and it scares me. By all the standard measures, none of my family members were at a particularly high risk. None were overweight in least, they were all active and fit, they didn't eat junk food, and while not vegetarian, they ate far more fruits and vegetables than most Americans. My brother with melanoma was a fit athlete, and did use sunscreen. There was never a primary site found on his skin - he was only diagnosed when he started getting symptoms from the brain tumors. Now THAT is scary stuff! You've already heard here about people who had lung cancer and never smoked (and I had a friend in that situation), and a vegan who was diagnosed with cancer. It all goes to show that while there are things that can reduce your risk somewhat, there is nothing that can guarantee you don't get it, and anyone who thinks they are safe from cancer because they do X is just in denial of the hard truth.

July 2015 COTM: The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean, Chapters 5-8

MIDDLE EASTERN CHOPPED SALAD - p. 136

I made this using the option given in the recipe of diced, full-size tomatoes, instead of cherry tomatoes. I did not add the optional radish or scallion. The green chiles, garlic, salt, and lemon juice were mashed in a mortar, as instructed, and the olive oil added bit by bit. Like in LN's version, mine did not develop a mayonnaise texture, but I don't think it was supposed to. There's no emulsifier in this dressing, so I think you're really just going for a well-blended vinaigrette.

This salad is very simple, but delicious, and made with good tomatoes, was excellent along with the hummus from p. 24 and some flatbread for a summery meal. The mint/parsley combo was key to the vibrant flavor.

Jul 29, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
2

July 2015 COTM: The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean, Chapters 1-4

HUMMUS - p. 24

I had cooked up a big batch of chickpeas the other day, so I decided to make the hummus from this book as a way to use some of them up. Because I'd cooked my chickpeas before I decided to make hummus, I did not follow the directions in this recipe. So I started at the point where you add 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid with the tahini, garlic, salt, and lemon juice to a blender (a blender is given as an option to a FP in the recipe, and it is my preferred tool for hummus). This is similar to what I usually do, blending the garlic in liquid first, except that I usually don't include the tahini at that point. This time I did, although I can't tell that it made much difference. Then the chickpeas get added to this liquid. I like to add them a little at a time so they get smooth.

I found the amount of salt and lemon was just about perfect, and did not need to adjust at the end. This was a very good version of hummus, although not better than what I usually make. This is a strictly personal preference, but I like more tahini in my hummus, so next time I will go back to my normal proportions. I garnished with half-sharp paprika, but in hindsight, I kind of wish I'd used sumac like BC. I had the hummus with some homemade GF flatbread and the chopped salad from p. 136, and called it a meal.

Jul 29, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
2

What cookbooks have you bought lately, or are you lusting after? Roll out those lazy crazy days of summer, July 2015 edition! [old]

California water regulations definitely need reform. The state makes Texas look downright progressive.

Jul 28, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

August 2015 COTM Announcement: THE NEW SPANISH TABLE and MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN

If you just look at the authors on that series, it's clear that they picked really good people for each country or region.

Jul 28, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

August 2015 COTM Announcement: THE NEW SPANISH TABLE and MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN

I don't think it ever has come up in nominations. It's a large-format book, almost like the "beautiful" series, and they tend to not get as much respect as they should (the "beautiful" series books are all fantastic). It's older - 1992 - and the photos have a dated look to them. But I've found it reliable, great reading, and a nice overview of Spanish food, to the extent something like that can exist. This is the book that taught me to put rosemary sprigs on my paella in place of snails. The snails eat rosemary, thus taste like rosemary. If you can't get the snails, you can get the flavor from the herb. Brilliant.

August 2015 COTM Announcement: THE NEW SPANISH TABLE and MY KITCHEN IN SPAIN

Your question made me go look at my Spanish books and think about them. If I had to pare down my collection to the bare minimum, the survivors would be as follows:

The Food and Wines of Spain, by Penelope Casas
The Food of Spain, by Claudia Roden
The Heritage of Spanish Cooking, by Alicia Rios and Lourdes March (If I had to pare down to one, this would be it)
Catalan Cuisine, by Coleman Andrews

Now that I've thought this out, I'm tempted to really pare it down. But I have not included the August COTM books in this analysis. Mainly because I haven't had a chance to go through My Kitchen in Spain, which just might make the cut.

Oh, and you culled 40 books???!!! I'm really interested in knowing what your criteria were and what books got cut. Culling is something I need to do, but I'm horrible at actually doing it.

Jul 28, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

What cookbooks have you bought lately, or are you lusting after? Roll out those lazy crazy days of summer, July 2015 edition! [old]

This web site shows 42" per year for Swoope, VA, and it does show it fairly evenly spread throughout the seasons.
http://rainfall.weatherdb.com/l/25330...

The average for VA as a whole is 44". 35" is not a normal year anywhere on the East coast. 35" is about what we got in my former home of Austin, TX, which is a lot drier than it is here in the East. Of course in Austin, like much of the West, you get a good percentage of that 35" in just a couple big storms where you might get 10" or more in one day. Most of that runs off. Having lived in TX, I can assure you that anywhere in VA, NC, or SC is much wetter and greener year round. And even in VA, Salatin does irrigate.

In California, rainfall is much lower (Napa averages 20" per year, and that is not the Central Valley where most of the agriculture happens, and which is even drier). Salatin's system would take much more land there than it does here in the East, and would still require irrigation and feed (also produced through irrigation) to be brought in. I just can't see this as a sustainable system for California. Perhaps there is no sustainable system for California.

Jul 28, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

July 2015 COTM: The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean, Chapters 1-4

Audrey, I always make hummus in a blender, even though I have a FP. I just prefer the texture that way.

Jul 28, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
1

What cookbooks have you bought lately, or are you lusting after? Roll out those lazy crazy days of summer, July 2015 edition! [old]

If you want more traditional dishes, and more home cooking, My Kitchen in Spain would be the way to go. The writing is also more personal. The New Spanish Table is more focused on contemporary cooking, and dishes from restaurants, although it does have traditional dishes as well. If pictures matter to you, The New Spanish Table has some pictures of the food. My Kitchen in Spain has none. I find the design of The New Spanish Table a bit distracting. My Kitchen in Spain has a more standard layout, and I find it easier to read.

Jul 28, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking
2

What cookbooks have you bought lately, or are you lusting after? Roll out those lazy crazy days of summer, July 2015 edition! [old]

OK, I just realized that is is a new book (already!) from Ms. Jones, and the one I cooked from was A Modern Way to Eat. Maybe a case of too similar titles causing the confusion on my part. Given my experience with her first book, I will probably pre-order the second.

Jul 27, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought lately, or are you lusting after? Roll out those lazy crazy days of summer, July 2015 edition! [old]

And another, from an author I admire who writes regularly on issues of food ethics:
http://www.psmag.com/nature-and-techn...

It would be interesting to see Joel Salatin try to implement his system in California. I doubt he would get the same results he does in Swoope, VA. Salatin lives in an area with 50 inches of rain spread evenly throughout the year. He can get one cow per acre, but what often isn't mentioned is that he still imports feed for his animals. It's not a closed system. In the West, ranchers cannot support the density of cattle that Salatin does. You will see things more like one cow per 500 acres. And you still have the problems of displacing wildlife, land degradation, etc.

I live in the South Carolina upcountry, an area similar to where Salatin lives in its rainfall and year-round greenness. There are small farmers here who can graze livestock on grass all year, but this is a rare environment that does not exist in most of the US. For the past several years, I have purchased meat and dairy exclusively from such farms, all of which are very small-scale. I won't go into the details of that experience here, but believe me when I tell you that the result of eating that way was eating very little meat. And learning that meat, dairy, and eggs are SEASONAL products, and you can't just go buy whatever cut of whatever animal you want whenever you want it. In the middle of winter (and we have mild winters here), if there was a cold snap, the hens stop laying, and there are no eggs. Milk production drops to the point where there isn't any available. I made my own cheese, and learned that cheese is also a seasonal product - based on time when the milk is right for a certain type of cheese, plus the aging time for the cheese. Oh, and milk doesn't taste the same all year either. Last time I bought a chicken, I had to order it 3 months in advance and paid $30 for it. It involves lots of special trips to farms, drop-off points, CSA pick-ups, farmers' markets, etc. And you still have to go to a regular store for toilet paper. It doesn't reduce the carbon footprint of the food, it increases it. And it does't reduce the water footprint either, except for the fact that the pain-in-the-assedness of it all does reduce the amount of meat one eats. Drastically. I don't see most Americans eating this way, ever. First off, such a system will not scale to meet the current demand. Plus, for the consumer, the cost is high, the time involved is high, and it really is not more environmentally friendly. You want to kind to the environment right now? Ride a bike to to the closest supermarket and eat plants. You want access to a variety of meats, dairy, and eggs all year, consistently available and consistent in taste, in the quantities that Americans eat now? Only an industrial food system can provide that.

September 2012 COTM My Calabria: Vegetables, The Calabrian Pantry, Desserts

The fig recipe is not baked. You use dried figs, cut a slit in the base, insert one strip of orang peel and one almond, then dip the bottom of the fig in chocolate. It's more like a candy than a dessert. They make an excellent Christmas "cookie" type thing. I've also made just the candied orange peels on their own, and I've also done the candied orange peels partially dipped in chocolate.

I will admit that appeal of the book is to me is that a fair number of the desserts are gluten-free, and others can be easily adapted. Also a lot of the desserts have savory elements or ingredients unexpected in a dessert, and that appeals to me as well (I'm not normally much a dessert person). So the sweet and spicy pepper tart is one that appeals to me (using hot pepper jam and marmalade). I haven't made the watermelon pudding yet, but at some point this summer, when I find myself with a watermelon on hand, I intend to.

Jul 27, 2015
MelMM in Home Cooking