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Dual fuel range

We had the Dacor DF range several years ago. It had the Discovery controller with under glass elements. It was a nightmare but they did buy it back. I don't know if your current range is like this but some electric ovens work by computer "logic". When you turn the oven on, the preheat comes on and brings it to temperature. The element then oscillates on and off quickly according to a computer program in theory to keep the temperature in a very narrow range. The thermostat does not come into play until it drops by a predetermined amount. With mine it was about a 200F drop but now the current use and care manual on their newest model seems to indicate it is about 50F, so that is much better but still not that great. The problem is that using the "logic" does not consider baking something like cookies where you are opening and closing the door or putting something very cold into the oven. The program does not have a way to compensate for any of that. The use and care manual also states that food must be removed if the preheat comes back on because the heat is so intense. If you have a separate oven thermometer it can be very revealing. The Capital electric ovens and DF ranges also work this way with a 150F drop required to activate the preheat. I would want to find out how any oven with an element under glass works before I bought it. I prefer a regular thermostat. Most of those will have no more than a 25F swing on either side of the set temp. Many ovens are much less than that.
I have a Wolf DF range now which I loved for a little over 4 years but now has to be replaced because it has the Wolf blue enamel chipping issue and is chipped down to bare metal and unusable for most baking. Wolf has not been helpful with this well known issue. I have not had much confidence in any DF ranges so far. Miele does have a new one but it has no track record yet because it is so new. It has a lot of electronic features though.

My experience with Dacor might have soured me on electronics but Wolf did have this part right. The electronics will allow control of the elements, including a third element in the back of the oven(s) and fan(s) to
-direct heat -this can be as simple as from the top for roasting and bottom for baking to as complex as the 22 modes Miele and gaggenau has.

-control fan speed- high speed for faster browning, lower for slower.

-provide more even heat when the oven is full

Most prostyle electric ovens will have these features. Gas ovens will not. I have baked for 40 plus years with regular ovens gas and electric but I kind of like the electronic features if they can get them right. So sad that Wolf did do that but the structure of the oven failed. I do have an Electrolux wall oven that I love for baking but not sure if the DF range works the same way. It works almost as well as the Wolf oven. It might be worth looking at it.

Jul 01, 2015
wekick in Cookware

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI - Are there any good restaurants?

Thanks for the update. We are in Springfield almost monthly these days. We have been to the Metropolitan Farmer a few times and it has been mostly good. Did not know about the free glass of wine :-). We will have to try some of the others.
Leong's can be good or bad. We hit it up every now and then and hope for good.

Jun 30, 2015
wekick in Great Plains

New Kitchen, ideas

I had a Kohler red glazed CI sink at one time. It had a big sink and a small sink with the garbage disposal that worked pretty good if you only have room for one sink.

Jun 29, 2015
wekick in Cookware

New Kitchen, ideas

For your sink consider the biggest pans you might need to lay flat to soak. Consider the ergonomics of your sink. It can be back breaking if your sink is too deep or set too far back.

You might look at the kitchen forum on gardenweb

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/kitch...
Also the appliance forum

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/appl/

Jun 29, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Best or "Can't Miss" Local Restaurants in Omaha?

I don't live there but visit a few times a year. I have had great experiences at the Grey Plume, Le Voltaire and Dario's. Le Voltaire has a great bakery. Dinker's for hamburgers. Sage Student Bistro is fun. They took me on a tour of the kitchen. Jams is a neighborhood place.

Jun 26, 2015
wekick in Great Plains

list your favorite kitchen gadgets

I use a manual can opener too( "swing away"). I have a couple extras found at a thrift store. "Made in USA".

Jun 25, 2015
wekick in Cookware

list your favorite kitchen gadgets

My really old carbon steel peeler. Takes off a thin layer and is still so sharp.
Really fine microplane for zesting.
Hand meat grinder- no food processor can match the texture.
My newest addition is a oxo cherry pitter. I used to use a big fat bobby pin but you can't seem to find them anymore except online so thought I would try this. It works pretty good.
My grandmothers old fork. It turns chicken without knocking any coating off.

Jun 24, 2015
wekick in Cookware
1

Cake Baking cookware and tips

Agree with both books.

Jun 16, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Any Advice On Aluminum Frying Pans?

My mother had an aluminum skillet that became nonstick over time. I had a griddle that was the same. It just takes time to build it up and mindful cleaning. I have taken my aluminum bakeware and treated it like alexander describes. I clean it really well with a not brand new golden fleece so it is a little softer which removes any debris but not the really hard polymerized stuff. I used to use a green scrubby and sometimes still will very lightly to keep the surface smooth or for a stubborn patch of something burned on. My mothers pan and my griddle were so nonstick they easily wiped out/ off with a dish cloth. I had to get a new aluminum griddle that was bigger and am working on seasoning it but don't use it as much so not sure if it will happen in my lifetime. :-).

Jun 10, 2015
wekick in Cookware

What cut is this?

Yeah or a group of old guys, sometimes fundraisers.
That reminds me that there is a little pop up building on a lot close by that is selling food of some sort I need to check out. :-)

Jun 09, 2015
wekick in General Topics

Anyone buy used kitchen stuff?

Most of my kitchen stuff is from the secondary market.

Jun 09, 2015
wekick in Cookware
1

Anyone buy used kitchen stuff?

Look for two rivets on the handles for the oldest pans that have the most copper on the bottom. I like the bail handle stock pots.

Jun 09, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Glass cookware?

Corning ad

Jun 08, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Glass cookware?

You can get pyroceram cookware but it is not very good for stovetop use because it conducts heat so poorly and prone to hot spots. The best source is on the secondary market. Corning made tons of it under the brand Corning Ware. Corningware is now made by World kitchens but is mostly stoneware with just a few pieces made in pyroceram and at astronomical prices. My mother used the pyroceram on the stove but had electric burners so the heat source was a little more even than a gas burner and she cooked at low temps so it kind if worked for her. If you want to try it, make sure that it has a smooth bottom and and is in good condition. Most I have has been found in mint condition. I use mine for baking.
A couple more articles.
http://jillcataldo.com/my_love_for_ol...

http://www.corningware411.com/2011/09...

Corning also made the rangetopper version that had aluminum on the bottom to improve heat conduction. I don't know how well they work. They are very hard to find in flea markets or antique malls but you can find them on eBay and etsy.
http://www.corningware411.com/2013/05...

Jun 08, 2015
wekick in Cookware

What cut is this?

I've had some that were so tough you could hardly chew them. A quick read thermometer is a simple thing that pays off in huge dividends. All of the moisture of the meat is expelled between 140-160F, but if you cook it to 195F or a little more the collagen and connective tissue melt and it becomes very tender and along with the fat, coats the dry fibers. This is why you have the Texas crutch. A pot if sauce also provides that moisture sort of a braise.

Jun 08, 2015
wekick in General Topics

What cut is this?

It used to be that they were mainly found in St. Louis, Mo but have expanded more recently. I would say most people have what they consider to be "the" way to cook them. Even though these were very popular in St Louis you could only find them in parking lot bbqs and back yards and rarely in restaurants but that has also
changed.

Jun 08, 2015
wekick in General Topics
1

What cut is this?

Where I live, that's a pork steak. I have never seen one fried. They are cooked on a fire in the backyard. Some people do a quick sear and cook them to 150F. I think they are dry and chewy at that point. Some people smoke them. The most popular way to cook them is to grill them and then put them in a pot of sauce and cook them until the collagen and connective tissue melts and they start falling apart which is about 195-200F. Everybody has their own sauce but it is usually tomato based, a little sweet and often has beer in it. I add a little hoisin to mine. My preference is to cook them in one layer on a cookie sheet covered in the oven until they start getting tender and then transfer to the grill and contine over a low fire basting with the sauce letting it caramelize on the pork steaks. I prefer 7 bone steaks.
http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/ap_...

As to doneness, some people like a little tug left in them while others like them falling apart.
Here's a local article.
http://m.feastmagazine.com/dine-in/fe...

Jun 06, 2015
wekick in General Topics

Your "pro-style" range: Would you spend the money again?

I am not convinced on any DF ranges at present. Miele does have a newer one out but there hasn't been enough on it yet in use. I would avoid any DF range that works on "logic" instead of a conventional thermostat. The Dacor discovery models and Capital Connoisseurian have this.

I would choose a range top and wall oven. You can pick each for optimum function for how you cook. If something goes wrong with part of it you aren't out the whole appliance. I like the oven at waist height. I would lean toward a Bluestar range top. I was going to buy a BS range when I remodeled but at the time they were having a lot of problems and we bought the Wolf based on the service they provided at that time. They did at that time stand behind their products beyond the warranty. I would miss the great simmer on all the Wolf burners but there are work a rounds for that. I would let the burner trays season on the BS. With a wall oven you would sidestep the BS hot door issue, if it is an issue with the range. You could have an electric oven that way with features that I think are a benefit. This would be multiple modes that allow you to direct heat and vary the fan speed, potentially less heat in the kitchen, higher humidity for baking when needed and wider broiler. I really like my Electrolux wall oven I have. It is nimble in that it has a great range of heat and fan combinations. It bakes pretty evenly and does preheat much faster than Wolf does. It did have blue enamel issues but was fixed and does not have ongoing issues like Wolf seems to have with blue if you read Gardenweb's appliance forum. Some posters over there have had 2-3 Wolf wall ovens. The ranges seem to take longer to develope problems. The Electrolux has been redesigned recently so that it has dual fans and you can leave the racks in for cleaning.

May 26, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Your "pro-style" range: Would you spend the money again?

I have the Wolf DF too. You do have to use bigger pans on the bigger burners. My smallest pan is a squat 7inch 1 1/2!qt sauce pan. You also have to use pans that conduct heat well. I make caramel frequently and have no ring of heat using heat conductive pans. Most pro style ranges tend to have bigger burners. I have found the range of flame to be great on mine so maybe there is something wrong with yours. We just clean the black porcelain with dawn and soak with baking soda fore something heavy. Black vs stainless is a personal preference as some people report discoloration on the stainless that they don't like. Overall I really liked my DF although I have a wall oven that I use most of the time. Mine bakes very evenly but I preheat any oven a good thirty minutes when I am baking. I allow the Wolf 36" oven to heat 40 minutes for baking. Some ovens indicate they are at temperature but need additional time to stabilize.

Still I don't recommend the Wolf DF because mine had the blue enamel chip off the bottom down to the bare metal. I did not realize this right way because the oven is low. I would periodically wipe the bottom with a white paper towel looking for tiny blue shards so you can catch it early. My oven was shot at 4.5 years with light use. This is a known issue with their blue enamel and they will only fix it during the first two years of the warranty. I can only use mine with no convection and the food must be covered. If I pay to have it fixed, they won't tell me how much it costs only that labor starts at $800. They will only guarantee the new part for a year.

May 26, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Food Storage/Dry goods in Mason Jars?

I use the ring and seal and white plastic. I most often transport salad dressing and never had either leak that I can think of. I have had one tip over in the frig and leak but it wasn't screwed on that tight.

May 22, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Cheese Grits Bottom Crust for Chicken Pot Pie?

I would probably make the crust of the grits and bake enough to brown just a little then add the filling. I made an appetizer at Christmas that had toasted cheesy grits as a base. Part of the family has to be gluten free so we are always subbing for wheat.

May 04, 2015
wekick in Home Cooking

What is this utensil? Pics included.

I think that was me that donated it. ;-))

Apr 25, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

I had an Emil Henry but gave it to my DIL so not sure how it is. I have made several pies in the pyroceram corningware and the have browned well on the bottom. The only problem is you can't see the bottoms so they come out of the oven "on faith". I have an upside down caramel apple pie that I always baked in Pyrex that is bigger than the corningware. It has to flip upside down when you take it out. I baked it in an aluminum pan and the bottom did not get done. I might need to resize the recipe.

Apr 24, 2015
wekick in Cookware
1

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

I use bare aluminum for any type of cakes, muffins or anything on a sheet. I like glass preferably corningware pyroceram for pies but have a few recipes that require an off size and for that I have kept a few pieces of old PYREX and I also bake some things in cast iron both bare and enameled. Also some Pilivuyt and other ceramic dishes. Also have gathered pyroceram in 9x13 and some other dishes. It is easy to find in mint condition in thrift shops for a few dollars. I could cut down but like finding unusual pieces and have the room to keep it.

Apr 24, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

All caps is the old trademark
BUT it has to be clear almost colorless and no decorative needle cutting. If you look at Wikipedia there is a photo that shows the difference.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrex
Scroll down under history.
I have one with needle cut flowers in it. I still changed most of mine for the pyroceram corningware because it is better yet. Most of the anchor stuff I have seen is soda lime glass. It is much thicker than the old fire king but not sure when they changed.

Apr 23, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

I already have gotten rid of most if mine.

Apr 22, 2015
wekick in Cookware
1

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

I guess I am looking at the defects as part of its physical properties and contributes to the glass breaking unexpectedly. Sitting on a shelf could be a use outside of the tolerance of some pieces of glass because of the stress present in the glass. Little chips and cracks that develop over time might do the same thing.

Apr 21, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

I should have been more clear but I put environmental in quotes because that was the reason given by people defending the use of soda lime glass for bakeware. I should have included an eye roll. Anchor has this on their website.
http://www.anchorhocking.com/Bakeware... I have read things along these lines.
https://thestatsblog.wordpress.com/20...

Yes I am aware that you can't switch back and forth. Corning had both types of factories. The Charleroi plant has always made some version of soda lime glass since the 1940s. It was the brightly colored opaque "PYREX". When World Kitchens bought it they started making clear almost colorless "pyrex" there. This is why World Kitchens can say with a straight face, that they have been making Pyrex out of soda lime glass since the 1940s. It is much more difficult to find out the history of the Corning borosilicate factories where the clear "PYREX" was made. They still have borosilicate "PYREX" labware and bakeware. You can go on the Pyrex.com website and see what is made where worldwide.

Apr 21, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

To me "user error" and "blame" would be a separate things. Anytime a Pyrex dish breaks, it has been used outside its physical tolerances. You could put something cold in the dish and put it in the oven and create a situation that exceeds the 100F differential that can cause the dish to shatter. In the photo above, the bread can keep heat in the area where it is and the outer part of the dish can cool producing this differential. The large glass handles on new pyrex can cool more quickly than the center of the dish. Glass can become "bruised" and shatter sitting in the cabinet. Even with vintage Pyrex you have to be careful. Anything opaque was made of soda lime glass even though it caries the old "PYREX" trademark. One of the reasons they changed to soda lime is "environmental".

There is new corningware that is pyroceram and it is made in France.

Apr 21, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Stop The Pyrex/Glassware Shenanigans (Extreme temperature change issues)

I don't know but one of the problems with corning ware as far as making money is that it never broke so lasted forever.

Apr 21, 2015
wekick in Cookware