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Why did my Pyrex baking dish explode?

They did at one time have "Flame Ware".

http://www.corellecorner.com/magazine-ads/405-1937-advertisement-clear-pyrex-ware-oval-casserole-flameware-saucepan-skillet.html

http://www.corellecorner.com/magazine-ads/254-pyrex-flameware-manual-guide-instructions-stovetop-1947-canada.html

Pyrex is still made in the US and elsewhere in the world. Previously clear PYREX was made of borosilicate glass by Corning in the US and borosilicate tolerates a difference of about 300F within the piece of glass. The name Pyrex was sold. World Kitchens is one of the owners of the name now and claims Pyrex has been made for the last 60 years of soda lime glass. They use lower case "pyrex". This is true and was at the Charleroi plant. It was the opaque, usually white glass but was marked with all caps, PYREX. They now manufacture clear pyrex there of soda lime glass since the late 90s. Soda lime glass will only tolerate a difference of about 100F within the piece. The great big handles on the new stuff would seem to cool much quicker than the main part of the pan so increase the danger of shattering.
You can see if you bring a piece out of a 350F oven into a 75F room which one could be a problem.
Pyrex bakeware is still made in other parts of world of borosilicate glass and trademarked "PYREX". Lab ware is also made of borosilicate and trademarked "PYREX".

http://www.pyrex.com/

Apr 13, 2014
wekick in Cookware

What is your oldest cookbook?

I love that kind of thing.

Apr 13, 2014
wekick in Not About Food
2

What is your oldest cookbook?

I have a handwritten book from 1820 that is all cakes. It came in a box at an auction that I bought for something else.

Apr 13, 2014
wekick in Not About Food

A great idea, not!

Washing soda is alkaline so while it might work for that, you need something acidic for mineral deposits.

Apr 09, 2014
wekick in Cookware

A great idea, not!

Mineral deposits- it will dissolve with a weak acid like vinegar. You might need to let it soak, pour it out and replace the vinegar until it is gone.

Apr 09, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Deli Cole Slaw Surprise

I haven't seen that. I would be very unhappy if that happened. I have had salad dressings at restaurants that are not labeled on the menu as sugar free or low fat that contain chemical substitutes.

Apr 07, 2014
wekick in General Topics
1

Deli Cole Slaw Surprise

Definite taste and aftertaste for me to any sweetner even stevia.

Apr 07, 2014
wekick in General Topics

Help ID Original Use for old earthenware Jar (Robinson-Ransbottom)

I think something like that could have many uses. It could be used for pickles, curing olives, making wild cherry bounce -anything that has smaller size. A narrower neck will help keep things submerged in whatever liquid you are using. I have a crock a similar shape but smaller with an ear of corn painted on the side. It is missing its lid. The family story was that they used it for canning. Kind of scary if that was true.

Apr 03, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Road trip: Athens Alabama I65

You are pretty close to Big Bob Gibson's in Decatur. There are two locations there and we like the original one on 31 the best.

Apr 03, 2014
wekick in Central South
1

Pork tenderloin - high or low heat roasting?

I had to consider my DILs when they were pregnant and now my elderly father. My mother when she was living was taking immunosuppressants. It is really pretty easy to do a quick sous vide. It works with steaks as well. No reason to serve a piece of shoe leather when people must or just want to have their meat gray. I use a quick sous vide because I don't want to take a chance of allowing the bacteria to grow in the sous vide environment.

Apr 01, 2014
wekick in Home Cooking

Pork tenderloin - high or low heat roasting?

The key for me is enough heat to the outside to produce browning and crispness. The second thing is to have the temperature you want inside. There are different combinations of technique and heat that will provide that result. They might range from sous vide and hitting it with a blow torch to high heat roasting. The slower you bring up the internal temperature, the more even the doneness will be in the piece of meat and there us less chance to over shoot the end temperature. High heat roasting will produce the browned or even charred outside and then a layer that is gray and theoretically over cooked and then the center that is slightly pink and at the correct temperature. Sous vide will produce an even color through out. I kind of like the mix of colors so use high heat roast or grill. We use sort of quick sous vide if we have guests that need their meat well done when grilling.

Apr 01, 2014
wekick in Home Cooking
1

Fruit Pies with DRY FILLING ~ UGH !

Definitely check the temp. It might need to be calibrated.

Mar 31, 2014
wekick in Home Cooking

Stainless-lined copper pans from the 1970s

It might be that they are using the term cast iron very loosely. I have heard people refer to stamped steel as iron vessels, They are made of iron but not cast. They mention in their history they manufacture "deep drawn" products as opposed to cast.

Yes it would seem that they are referring to something like Revere Ware but it could be they electroplated copper to the entire exterior. I could not find any pieces to illustrate just electroplating the bottom only. They refer to electroplating copper in their history. Extra thick is a very subjective term.

Mar 31, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Stainless-lined copper pans from the 1970s

This is one of the patents for this cookwareand he talks about why he designed it the way he did.
https://www.google.com/patents/US2967134

There is some type of reference to Revere in the patent. The patent is cited. Revere claims to get a plating of 0.5 mm copper and thicker when the pan had thicker walls.
https://www.google.com/patents/US2363973

Mar 30, 2014
wekick in Cookware

ge range convections oven

I think appliance companies feel like they have to justify buying convection and like to say they will do everything but they don't. When I first got my convection oven, I didn't really understand how it worked. I just started reading about ovens in general and about convection or fan assisted ovens. I read about baking, starch gelatinization, the Maillard reaction, articles on meat science and baking forums. One of the problems is almost every article about convection ovens either has partial explanations, makes blanket generalizations that are not true or contains misconceptions. There can be big differences in convection ovens. Some have an additional element(s) in the back with the fan. Some have computer boards that vary when the different elements come on and off and vary the fan speed to create different modes. When you use convection, some food might might cook 10% faster and other food 30% faster. It is sort of trial and error to see how yours will work.

Mar 26, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Addressing people by gender at a restaurant

If I were the server and dependent on tips, I would avoid any language that could make somebody mad. No presumptions.
No-
When are you due?
Merry Christmas.
Is this your mother(or wife or daughter)?
No gender specific greetings.

Mar 25, 2014
wekick in Not About Food

ge range convections oven

Convection is optional on most ovens so my guess is that Martha is not using convection to bake a cake. If you wish to use convection on a conventional recipe, you would turn the temperature down not up. This is because convection increases the amount of heat transferred over a given time. To complicate things, some ovens have an auto correct and turn the temperature down automatically. Convection is not the best for baking a cake because it is drying so causes the cake to set before the rise is complete. That is most likely what happened to your cake. Some do report success with convection and may have a fan at lower speed so less drying. Convection just a tool and should be used when it will benefit what you are cooking. It is great for things that you want to brown or be crispy.

Mar 25, 2014
wekick in Cookware
1

Restaurants not having websites only Facebook

True. This site is very valuable for finding the little out of the way places.
We were recently in a bakery in a small that we just drove by. It was a find with all kinds of regional treats. We asked about local food and the guys face lit up and he came around to the front and gave us all kinds of places to go in the region. Nothing beats that. The websites were still helpful in knowing prices, exact items and hours and making our choices for the next several days.

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Not About Food

It's nothing to be ashamed of but.......

We have the cooks treat. The dressing sticking out of the turkey that is basted and crispy with some crispy skin.

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Not About Food
1

Restaurants not having websites only Facebook

This applies to places that have restaurants with a web presence. Otherwise we pick the place with the most cars if traveling or ask around. We happened on to some great places that way. We missed a lot too that were right around the block but we didn't know until the internet. We are a little pickier as we go along too. Now with all the additional information available via the internet we know about the great fried chicken place five miles ahead in the next town. We can make choice about whether we want to spend $30 or $100 for dinner. We might choose a place that has a lot of homemade food vs a place that has all fried food out of the freezer. Some places list specials online only. If I am looking ahead for a non chain place to eat, I am willing to detour if the place is open( we always call and double check) and I know what is on the menu and how much it costs. Knowledge is king in my book.

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Not About Food

On Not Receiving Bread

I would rather it be optional. In the OP's case, the cost is built in and they are paying for something they did not receive so that would bug me. I would say the server/bartender was at fault not the restaurant.

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Not About Food

Restaurants not having websites only Facebook

I don't care how they do it but we are on the road a lot and don't consider a place if there isn't a current menu with prices, hours they are open and the rules -cash only? Dress? reservations?

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Not About Food
1

How accurate is too accurate and using laboratory glassware in the kitchen

Right. I prefaced with that but when you bring up cooking this comes into play. Some people heat ingredients as well after measuring.

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Cookware

How accurate is too accurate and using laboratory glassware in the kitchen

If you are measuring only it won't matter. Cooking will. With soda lime glass if you create a 100F degree difference in the temperature of the glass, it is subject to shattering. If you remove something from a 350F oven this can easily happen if some parts of the glass cool quicker than others, especially with some of the large open handles some newer pieces have. Borosilicate glass will tolerate about 300F degrees in difference.

Mar 23, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Your Ideal Food Crawl - Best Answer Gets a Prize

Exactly what I thought of August but still really enjoyed it.

Mar 12, 2014
wekick in New Orleans

Consumer Reports Investigates Exploding Pyrex

"Breakage" is not the concern, explosion is. If this glass shattered as they had intended, it wouldnt be as much of an issue. In fact, if their patented process worked, we would not be hearing of explosions. "

Please post any links you have to describe what their patented process is intended to do. I would love to read that. Breakage-shattering-explosion -I don't want any of this in my kitchen as you can have life threatening injuries no matter what you call it. This would be very upsetting.

"As for pyrex vs PYREX, I doubt many people have the time or interest in discerning the two. It's just easier not to purchase the product."

It is a big world and believe it or not there are people who do have the interest. They might have some already and like the way it bakes and that you can see through it. Funny thing how people think differently about things. As I stated at the beginning of my post upthread, my observations are for them.

" As to the temp flux, I've seen estimates of much lower as to what this glass will withstand."

Would you mind posting a link to that that because I have only read mostly around 99-100 F and I am trying to get as much info as I can. These numbers are all generalities though as we do not have the specifics on WKI soda lime glass so their glass might have less tolerance. My guess is that this is proprietary information.

" That makes it virtually useless when removing from the oven. "

Yes it would seem so.

"In fact, think about it..if you take a dish from a 350 degree oven you will obtain that within a few min. "

No if you think it through, that might happen only if you put it in a zero degree freezer. You might then create that 300-350F degree differential. 350-72(room temperature) degrees= 278 so not to that 300 degree differential. If the whole dish cools some when you take it out too so less differential. One study I read had some shattering of borosilicate glass coming out of a 450 oven. That is why the old stuff didn't break. That is why some are content to use the old stuff.
Again there are different tolerances of the glass depending on its composition and how the piece is engineered. The old PYREX may have higher tolerances than the 300-330F quoted. They had flameware that tolerated sitting on a flame. PYREX lab ware also tolerates heat with a Bunsen burner.

"You can try to explain away my situation any way you wish, but the fact remains that it should not have exploded with 5 inch fragments flying across the room. People have reported taking measuring cups out of the dishwasher only to have them explode in their hands. No sitting them on the counter, no running them under water etc. Just going from heat to room temp can cause an explosion, in my opinion it makes this glass pretty useless. And what's worse is the fact that there is no reason for it. Well, other than profit."

You seem even after multiple explanations to have missed the point of my posts. I am in no way explaining your situation away. I am giving you the facts as to how this company has come to this point and how they explain themselves. While profits are most likely a primary motive, curiously, the move to soda lime glass was also because it was considered to be better environmentally. Nothing is ever totally as it seems.
I feel very bad that that happened to you and really you are doing the best thing for you and that is not to have anything to do with Pyrex. I would consider that the current "pyrex" would be dangerous at least for me too. I have had all my kids get rid of theirs.

Good Luck with your future cooking endeavors. May you cook in comfort and safety.

Mar 09, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Consumer Reports Investigates Exploding Pyrex

From what I have read the opal glass fell out of favor by its looks. I love it though and have some of the mixing bowl sets. I love all the bright colors.
It is possible that the white PYREX even though soda lime glass had different thermal shock properties than the type made now. It does seem to be thinner than what is made now which would help with that. The exact composition of the glass may make a difference as well.

Mar 09, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Consumer Reports Investigates Exploding Pyrex

" tammyjk1021
I did read what you posted, but again, you seem to believe that the explosions are related to user error. "

I didn't use the term "user error", but if you the user exceed the 100 degree differential that the glass will tolerate, even inadvertently, yes I suppose it is user error. The term "user error" has the connotation of fault to some but fault is a separate issue. In this case I think people expect WKI "pyrex" to be "PYREX" of the past. There are some discussions on line about Corning/WKI diluting the brand because people generally expect "pyrex" to have the physical properties of "PYREX" that was made of borosilicate glass. There are also some discussions on various tech boards where chemists bought "pyrex" assuming it was "PYREX" and were caught in the same predicament you were. So even the chemists had "user errors". You just didn't know how easily it could shatter. In my mind, when they changed the formula to one that did not withstand the temperature gradient. it was no longer PYREX as people knew it. I kind of think that it is the reason that the trademark World Kitchens has is in lower case letters. Lab glass and bakeware in Europe still has the PYREX trade mark and is made of borosilicate glass.

"This is just not true. As to the temp differences in my instance...have a good look at your oven. There are vents there that release heat on top of your stove. That is where my pan sat, with the warmth of the oven there. Come on, if a pan sitting on a warm stove is not safe, what is? Of course it must be the towel! Maybe I should have sat it on a cold counter? That wouldnt cause a temp flux now would it. So basically, removing the pan from the oven in any matter is the problem right? "

Yes unfortunately it is physics. Think about your pan sitting there with heat from the oven vent on one side and not the other. My guess it that it would not be hard to create that 100F degree difference. Not your fault though. You didn't know.

"I did more than just skim your post, however when one uses Wiki, I will admit I don't pay it much attention. "

That explains many of your comments. Why would you bother to comment? I don't like to comment unless I have seen what I am commenting on -just a personal preference though. I like to be specific in my comments to what the person actually posted. If a wiki quote is used AND it is faulty, I would then comment on that.

In the case of this link it was a picture showing the difference in glass and trademarks. Even though Wiki can have its faults as any source of information can, it can also be very useful, sometimes the articles, but also the sources listed at the bottom of the page for the information in the article. You just need to apply the same standards and level of discernment that you would apply to any other source of information. It would be a shame to arbitrarily dismiss an entire source of information because it is fashionable to do so.

"I also read your post claiming that the glass wasnt changed and that is just false."

Note in my post what appears in quotes and the sources of the quotes. These are not my words.
I posted a quote from the World Kitchens guy and the history of the Charleroi plant to show how he can say that they have made (some)Pyrex from soda lime glass for the last 60 years. That is true, but but not all Pyrex back then was made of soda lime glass. They have only one major plant that made soda lime glass-- it was the opaque usually white Pyrex, not the clear stuff. The plants were built for the type of glass, borosilicate or soda lime. If you read the links, you will get an idea of what happened. Borden/ World Kitchen when they acquired the trademark "pyrex" all lower case, used that plant(Charleroi) to make the soda lime glass, clear almost colorless bakeware and the borosilicate glass was no longer made in the US by Corning for bakeware.

"Why would anyone in their right mind want to take that risk again."

I would not take "that" risk.
I am reasonably certain that all of my bakeware that I use in a heated application is borosilicate glass, allowing 300-330F difference in temperature so I am not taking that same risk a person would take with "pyrex" of the new soda lime glass type, allowing 100F degrees difference at least as far as thermal shock.
Ignorance was bliss for a long time as I never paid any attention to what I did with it. We never had any breakage in my mother's or my kitchen and that goes back a ways. I am mindful of the possibility breakage now so open the oven and let it cool in place a little. I only use it for pies and I have a small roaster that I use for slow cooking. I have some little pie dishes that are very thin PYREX and read that the thinness also helps the glass tolerate a greater temperature differential.

Mar 09, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Top End Non-Stick

I have a Tramontina skillet I bought at Costco years ago that has been used by my boys. It has a few tiny chips but still is pretty nonstick. It is marked restaurant ware, made in USA. Heavy gauge aluminum.
I very recently bought a Fissler nonstick skillet that has been used a handful of times and is scratched already.

Mar 07, 2014
wekick in Cookware

Consumer Reports Investigates Exploding Pyrex

Trademarks and manufacturer's marks are used to identify all kinds of things and are often used for a given time period or associated with a certain patent. It might be that one of the Pyrex books has this info and it would be easy to tell when items were made. If not trademarks and patents could be researched if someone really wanted to know in exact detail.

The most important thing is that you are comfortable with your pans.

Mar 07, 2014
wekick in Cookware