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Bridal shower ideas (brunch??) St. Louis

That is a great idea. We are actually having a baby shower and thinking of a park. We usually have them at home.

1 day ago
wekick in Great Plains

Been to Cozy Dog Diner in Springfield, IL?

My husband said he did not want any corn dogs- until he tasted mine.

1 day ago
wekick in Great Plains

Bridal shower ideas (brunch??) St. Louis

The time honored place is Miss Aimee Bs. They went through a rough patch and to have an event there was a melange of extra charges and rules but they have new owners and the rules seem more relaxed.

You could call Bella Vino on S Main in St Charles, and see what they have to offer.

Hendels over in Florissant is pretty good too.

Another option would be the Boat House which is a little drive but they have a great deck
on the river. They are in North Shore.
http://www.theboathouseontheriver.com

You might reserve a pavilion in one of the parks. Hobos in St Peters does catering that you pick up yourself and serve. It is very reasonable prices and very good. You could get desserts from 4 seasons bakery which are great.

1 day ago
wekick in Great Plains

Capital "Connoisseurian" dual fuel range

Here is a thread on Gardenweb about this range and also the Capital Maestro works this way too.
http://ths.gardenweb.com/discussions/...

This is a quote from Trevor Lawson from the Capital factory about how the ovens work.

"This is the answer I received from the factory due to the last thread.
There are two sides to this question and the complaints for each is shown below:

COMPLAINT: My oven doesn’t recover quickly when I reset the temperature to a higher setting (+150° F) or leave the door open for overly extended periods of time and takes too long to regain the set temperature.
a. SETTING: No quick recovery. Oven will cycle normally despite large temperature drops due to the door being left open, or the oven set temperature being reset to a much higher temperature. The recovery time can be very long for large differentials between oven temp and set temp.

COMPLAINT: My oven goes into a quick recovery mode when I reset the temperature (+150° F) or <b>leave the door open for excessive periods of time</b>, and burns my food.
a. SETTING: Quick recovery is set. Oven will go into PRE-HEAT mode if the difference between the oven temp and set temp is 150° or more. This reduces recovery time if the door is left open or if the set temp is increased."

Mar 28, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Traveling with frozen foods to beach vacation

We do that. We leave early 4am Friday and get in Sat Pm. I pack a big lasagna and meat. I will put ice on top if there is room or to fill in gaps but usually everything is solid when we get there. I don't open it at all. I will sometimes put a bag of ice in the cooler to pre chill it and then move the ice to another cooler for drinks. That Saturday shopping can be brutal, especially if you wait till you get to the beach.

is 2mm thick adequate for a vintage copper tin lined sauteuse evasee?

I passed on a beautiful 4.5 qt probably 3 mm pot marked "Waldorf Astoria" for $95. I could not lift it. If it had a helper handle I might have bought it. I wonder if that can be added.

Mar 18, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Clad Griddles?

Half clad
The description says the cooking surface is stainless but the picture doesn't look that way. I have only seen this in the nonstick version.
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/1/1/1...
Gaggenau has a plied one, 13x21 on this page as an add on for their induction, but it looks just like the Demeyere.
http://www.gaggenau-eshop.com/eshop/h...

Also this which seems to be in either 3 or 5 layers but its composition seems to be a mystery, but it does say in some places, that it has "surgical" :-)) grade stainless.
http://jollymollys.com/precise-heat-b...

Mar 14, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Cleaning Silestone Quartz countertop--any help appreciated

I wash it with a soapy cloth and then rinse and dry. Mine is light speckled gray with a matte finish. I did clean one area with baking soda as an abrasive once to get something off the kids got on it and it changed the texture a little, so don't do that.

Mar 10, 2015
wekick in Cookware

Baking in gas convection oven

I think you have to ask what does electric or gas do that make it better for baking or roasting. How does a fan fit into that? FWIW, this is my opinion from reading many baking forums and from my own experiences in baking in a multitude of gas and electric ovens.

When you buy a "convection" oven it means that a fan has been added but all ovens work by transferring heat by conduction, convection and radiation. The fan does the following.

It increases the rate of heat transfer
-First this evens out the heat while the oven is preheating so the oven will stabilize quicker. Ideally it evens out the heat while you are baking/roasting. The radiant heat from the walls of the oven also plays a very important in this as does bakeware.
-Dy making the heat more "even", it can change the direction of the heat toward food you are cooking. There can be more heat from the sides and top, so something like a cake might rise differently with heat coming from all directions. This may or may not be a good thing. Pies typically might need to have heat from the bottom. I do use convection even with a covered dish to get it cooking a little quicker.
-Things can cook quicker. This varies a lot and it is trial and error to see when you should turn the temperature down and shorten the cooking time, which can be by 10-30%.

The movement of air is drying. The Modernist Cuisine says that this is the most important thing about convection.
-This promotes browning and crispness. For meat unless it is very thin, the drying is superficial. The internal moisture is determined by the internal temperature at the end of cooking rather than external humidity. Some cookies benefit from this drying.
-Drying is often not the best thing for something that has to rise, during the first part of baking. It is good for the second part when you want it to brown after it is set. I often use convection for only part of the cooking time.

The movement of air can blow something delicate over and it can be misshapened, a reason for convection bake mode which is a lower fan speed.

These effects are determined by the relative size, number of, placement and speed of the fan(s).

Aside from the fan, gas and electric are different types of heat. You will read on many sites and textbooks that gas is moist heat because the combustion releases water as a byproduct and electric is dry heat because it does not release any water but you have to look past the source of heat. Look at how the oven is designed and what food is cooking to see what factors would influence the humidity of the oven chamber. Gas ovens require more ventilation due to the combustion, so more heat and moisture go into the kitchen. There might be more humidity when you first start a gas oven until the air starts circulating through the oven and it is lost. This is a thread from fresh loaf about the difficulty in keeping added humidity in a gas oven for bread baking and workarounds.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1733....
Many bakers resort to using cloches or even trying to block the ventilation to keep even added moisture in a gas oven. Roasting is often supposed to be superior in a gas oven because it makes things brown and crispy which again is promoted by dry heat. The Maillard reaction cannot take place until the superficial moisture is removed so increased humidity will inhibit that. Electric ovens are more of a closed system so hold onto the moisture they have from food which can be more than what the combustion from a gas oven produces. An electric oven is good for baking things that rise during the first part at least because of the additional humidity which promotes starch gelatinization. This allows a little bit longer for a cake to rise and less chance for cracks to form. It is also beneficial for crust formation in bread baking which is why so many add steam. The second part of baking often benefits from dry heat because it promotes browning. I read one forum where a baker opens the door in an electric oven to let humidity out halfway through and turns on convection to dry when baking a cake and started doing that which works well. There may be other things you bake that require higher humidity like a cheesecake that do better in an electric oven.

Some other features to consider

What is the highest and lowest temperature on both convection and conventional settings?

Some ovens, mostly electric, have a third and even fourth elements that work with the convection fan to keep temperatures more even when the oven is full. These may have the marketing terms of "True" or "European" convection. They may run on a cycle mostly by themselves or be incorporated in the bake, roast or other cycles. Some ovens use all the elements at the same time for faster preheat.

Some oven have variable fan speeds, lower for baking and higher for roasting rather than just on and off.

Some electric ovens have cooking modes are computerized to coordinate the fans and elements to direct the heat and keep the temperature in a very narrow range. There are some though who prefer not to have these modes as they feel it is more to go wrong.

Consider the broiler if you use it very much. Look at the width and consider with gas that there is a big difference in heat between a regular gas and "infrared" broiler.

There can be a big difference in how these features work again depending on how they are engineered. I had one oven with all the modes and third element convection that had hot spots in front of the fan and the ones I have now are very even. There are people who bake a cake with convection. Yes you can do it but I look at using convection only when I think it will provide a benefit. This means turning it off until it finishes rising and then turn it on. I think a convection fan would be more helpful for an electric oven so that you can provide the increased drying movement of air when necessary. For gas, it would be adding drying on drying.

Mar 08, 2015
wekick in Cookware

does silence on an rsvp mean they aren't coming ?

Family making excuses for other family.

Mar 07, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

does silence on an rsvp mean they aren't coming ?

I have been told it is too much to expect people to plan ahead and I should just have parties where it doesn't matter who responds. Maybe this is the way to go. :-(

Mar 07, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

Wolf Range Nightmares

I know this is an older post but my Wolf DF has the enamel all chipped off to the base metal. This is a known issue with the blue enamel. They can replace the liner but it is only guaranteed for a year and they won't tell how much it is to do it, only that it starts at $800.

Mar 01, 2015
wekick in Cookware

4 pieces of kitchen gear

When I was in school, I had a ten inch cast iron skillet, small turner, knife and a little electric sort of teapot that doubled as a humidifier.

Feb 28, 2015
wekick in Cookware
1

dinner host responsibilities

Yes you can get in a bit of a pickle by presuming to order alcohol in a business situation. We avoid any miscues about that by extending an invitation to our clients or employees to have a cocktail or whatever they want to drink as soon as they sit down. We might also ask what wine (or whatever else)they would like with dinner. If it is lunch during a workday, alcoholic drinks are not offered to employees because of the nature of their work. Other times we are being entertained by vendors or other business associates and they almost always extend an invitation as well. The food is handled the same way. I don't care what they order when I'm paying, especially the employees, but they are usually pretty conservative. The only time I took a rather dim view of someone was when they kept ordering rounds and bottles of wine for the table -on someone else's dime.

Feb 27, 2015
wekick in Not About Food
1

dinner host responsibilities

I don't think it is about a host policing what you eat but rather your response to that person's hospitality offered.

Feb 26, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Haha not "even ordering" but following your host's lead either verbal or nonverbal. Etiquette avoids fussing. It is being considerate and deferential. It is not presuming. In the case of the original poster, I would not have ordered alcohol in that situation because I did not know the person. There would then have not been any issues. That's how that works.

On the other side of the coin if I invite someone to dinner and I felt strongly one way or the other about what they ordered, I would not invite them again at least in that same situation.

I think it is interesting that you want to be more deferential in business dinners but not with family and friends.

Feb 25, 2015
wekick in Not About Food
1

dinner host responsibilities

If the host doesn't answer I order middle of the menu. If they say it all looks good or order what you like, then I do that. I don't ask anything about a person's religion. You just follow their lead. Alcohol would be the thing that would come up the most often for me and I don't order alcohol unless they do or say who "would like a cocktail". It is the same thing about appetizers or dessert which has nothing to do with religion. This is all pretty simple.

Again as long as what you do is working for you what do you care what I do.

Feb 25, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Let me summarize as this is getting kind of circuitous. Yes I would follow my uncle's or anyone else's lead in what they ordered unless they indicated to me to do otherwise. I think this is what I have stated all along. Cost is just one of many possible reasons that I would do this but I might not know all his circumstances so that is what I would do with him or anyone who invites me to dinner. The company of the person is infinitely more important than my choice of food and beverage and is the reason I am dining with them.

I have a question for you. How do you define what is excessive? Everybody has a different idea about that. You cannot go wrong following your host's lead by following what he orders or invites you to order. For me it is about being considerate of the person who invited you.

This is what I would do. You are free to do whatever you like. If what you are doing is working what do you care what I do?

Feb 25, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Yes it would be hurtful to someone to know you put your choice of food over their company. We agree on that.

Where we disagree is that not everyone is in the same circumstance you are in or feels the same as you do about entertaining. You can't expect people to conform to your ideas about entertaining. I will agree that yes people often do have issues. These issues might include That they cannot afford for you to get whatever you want. The greatest happiness is from being with the person and food and drink, as much as I like it plays a pale second fiddle. I have a friend for whom it is a sacrifice for her to buy a McDonalds Mcdouble but it is something she can afford. I would much rather have that with her than lunch at the Ritz. Some people just do not entertain. They spend begrudgingly and at a minimum. That is their prerogative. And then there are those with moral issues. Again their prerogative to pay for what they want to pay for. If you accept an invitation from someone, you accept their level of hospitality.

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

If I wanted to make sure I got my choice of what I want to eat or drink and that was more important than spending time with him, I would decline his invitation. I would then be free to order whatever I want and he would not have to pay for a dinner he can't afford or something not compatible with his religion for someone that doesn't really value his company over their food/drink choice. Win-Win!

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Yes I feel that way too. There are people who do not.

I might ask what they like here at what do you recommend?

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food
1

dinner host responsibilities

Communication is always a good thing. Let people know that you want them to order.

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Maybe. He is paying. You could always decline.

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

I don't guess. If it is someone like family or friends I already usually know them well enough to know their thoughts.
If it is someone I don't know, I follow their lead, whether it be drinks, dessert, extra courses-whatever, if they have been gracious enough to ask me to be their guest at dinner. This is for business, social or familial occasions. I want to be equally considerate in each situation. I don't see it as a game and it takes very little effort.

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

I agree that various types of alcohol enhance the food. I guess you missed that part of my post above. Not only the flavors but the alcohol itself makes everybody relax, enjoy their food and have a good time. In my own home I always have what you drink if I know what it is and cocktails and wine paired to the food I am serving. I keep several kinds of beer including gluten free. Still if I am invited to dinner by someone and they are paying, I would never take the chance of offending my host by ordering alcohol if they didn't, unless they said "please have a drink". The feelings of my family, friends and people I meet in business are much more important than the fact that I must have the right wine with my dinner. There are many personal reasons why people don't order alcohol and they really should not have to go into all of their reasons and ask you not to drink.
They don't order and they don't ask you if you want a drink-=nonverbal cue.

No I don't look at alcohol as just a way to get tipsy. Haha. The flask is just a solution for those who can't do without for whatever reason. You surely know people who carry them. I had an elderly cousin that carried a cane that was a flask. I also know someone who always has their own iced tea with them all the time. The people I know do this because they can't do without.

Feb 24, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Yes you might have to follow that too. People with strong moral convictions often will not use their resources in a way that goes against those convictions. They are paying.

Did the host choose the restaurant? I did not read that they did. The mother was from out of town.

It is really surprising to me that this is a problem. It is so simple to follow the lead of the host and so much less restrictive. I guess if you don't know your guest or maybe even if you do, the only way to avoid paying for alcohol (or anything else for that matter) if you don't want to, for whatever reason is to go somewhere that doesn't serve alcohol.

Feb 23, 2015
wekick in Not About Food
1

dinner host responsibilities

People are different and some do mind. Trust me.

Feb 23, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

Even if a person has puritanical views they have a right to those views. I have cousins that not only don't drink ethanol but also don't drink caffeine. Besides some Christians, Hindus and Muslims don't drink ethanol. There are many other religions that abstain as well. I think when you are someone's guest, it is just considerate and respectful to honor their religious views if it means that they don't want to pay for alcoholic drinks. If they don't drink but don't mind paying for yours, then that is Ok. Also consider that some people object to the expense. I have older relatives who are very generous but have a hard time understanding even a $10 drink. Most of the time the host will say "Would you like a cocktail?" "The lobster is very good here." "Who would like dessert?" This type of cue gives you an idea about what to order.

Is it "necessary to a good meal?" I love all kinds of drinks that enhance what I am eating but if I knew that my host did not want to pay for alcohol, usually their company means more than having an alcoholic drink.

I suppose if you can't do without for one meal, you could get there early and have a drink or bring a flask and slip off to the restroom or not go.

Feb 23, 2015
wekick in Not About Food

dinner host responsibilities

It depends on why they don't drink. If they have a religious reason they might not want to pay for it. Communication is key going both ways.

dinner host responsibilities

I don't think anyone is telling you what to eat. It is just as a guest you should be considerate of your host whether it be their personal beliefs about alcohol or how they spend money when dining out. We periodically take someone out to dinner when they visit and they ordered the most expensive thing on the menu plus any extra that the server might suggest. Now when they visit we take them where it is a capped expense- a buffet of some kind or eat at home. We also took another person out to dinner several times and they ordered "whatever they wanted"- oh look lobster. I love lobster! We quit doing that too.

Feb 22, 2015
wekick in Not About Food