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ronnielee33's Profile

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PORK HELP PLEASE!

If your roast had a bone in it, and the thermometer was hitting that (or a pocket of fat), that would give an anomalous temp reading. If your thermometer goes high enough, you can always check its accuracy in boiling water.

Sep 06, 2010
ronnielee33 in Home Cooking

Achiote oil in Sacramento?

I've never seen it for sale in this area, but it's really easy to make (which is what I do when I make gandule rice). You'll need 1C. olive oil and 2 - 2 1/2 T. achiote, a.k.a. annatto seed (can be purchased at a decent Mexican grocery store and some main stream ones, too). Combine in a saucepan, heat until the seeds start to sizzle, then remove from heat. Allow the seed to steep in the pan for about 1 minute--the oil/seed should be red--then strain. Do not overheat or everything will change color and the oil will be ruined (nastily bitter, yucky green/black color). It'll keep about 4 days out of the fridge (I've kept it longer in the fridge). Enjoy!

Sep 06, 2010
ronnielee33 in California

Brand new chest freezer -- what would YOU put in it?

Use them frozen, don't thaw them first.

Sep 06, 2010
ronnielee33 in Home Cooking

Trying to reduce my "plastic footprint" - How did grandma freeze meat?

Well, I was born in the fifties. We had a refrigerator/freezer that had the freezer at the bottom--a big roll-out basket. My grandmother had a chest freezer. A lot of people that lived in cold winter areas, farther from big city centers, did. Even when a blizzard would make the electricity go out, the food in the freezer in your garage/shed/porch would stay frozen.
Most folk had wrapped meat in freezer paper if it came from the butcher, or waxed paper covered with foil if it didn't and they didn't have freezer-quality butcher paper at home. I know some folk that put any waterfowl they shot in milk cartons, then filled the cartons with water and froze these. When chicken was on sale, some would cut them into pieces, lay them on a waxed paper covered cookie sheet, freeze, then sprinkle with water and freeze again (the ice layer protects from freezer burn, too), then package in meal sized portions. With the advent of cheaply available spray bottles, this becomes easier, too--I remember using the ironing sprinkle bottle (yes, we ironed way back when. I don't do this anymore and I only wear natural fibers. My clothes wrinkle, oh well). Hope this gives you some ideas.

Sep 06, 2010
ronnielee33 in Home Cooking

Culturally Insensitive Takeout

As a person in her fifties, I find their insistence upon calling Chinese food "Oriental food" to be puzzling. No one I know in my age group would do so and none of us were raised doing so (I've lived in several states). For us, it wasn't political, it's just there were/are so many different types of cuisine that would be included--heck, even the term 'Chinese' is pretty overgeneralized (do you mean Mandarin, Cantonese, Hong Kong style, Szechwan...). It is true that the term 'Oriental' was used as 'Asian' is used today (and I wouldn't dream of going out for 'Asian food'--unless there were a restaurant that truly served a multitude of Asian cuisines, and then it would probably be more like delis/restaurants in Hawai'i). I'd want to know which cuisine we wanted in order to make a decision. Perhaps, next time you and your spouse could take them for different types of "Oriental" food--Vietnamese, Thai, Japanese, etc, and broaden their horizons.

Sep 06, 2010
ronnielee33 in Features