m

mahi03's Profile

Title Last Reply

Slicing Flap Meat / Flank Steak

Fourunder - Thank you for your input. It is educational and valuable and is a great discussion platform.

The meat will be a separate component from the noodles and raw vegetables. Otherwise a stir-fry would be the more traditional approach. Slicing the meat, marinading it, and then cooking it on a grill IS indeed very labor intensive. It just happens to be the method, at least to date, that has produced the desired texture/flavor.

I have not yet tried a Top Butt Sirloin but I will. Thank you for the suggestion, and I welcome any other meats cuts as well.

The marinade is sweet. But even after marinading for 48 hours, I am unable to get the desired texture by cooking the steak whole, and then slicing thereafter. I completely agree this is the least labor-intensive approach, and I actually prefer this form of cooking (and eating) for my own personal steak, but it does not fit the dish well.

Of course, a top butt sirloin may solve this issue.

Mar 01, 2012
mahi03 in Home Cooking

Slicing Flap Meat / Flank Steak

The thought behind stacking was the following:

What if I stacked the meat on a tiering schedule, like creating a 45 degree staircase with the meat. Once frozen, this becomes a somewhat solid block of "tiered" pieces of steak. This way, if I place the meat on the slicer and cut the meat "flat", I'm actually cutting the meat at a 45 degree angle, due to the way the meat was stacked. something like this:

[=====}
[======]
[=======]
[========]

Mar 01, 2012
mahi03 in Home Cooking

Slicing Flap Meat / Flank Steak

Thank you for your reply! This is for a catering operation so there would be approximately 20 lbs. of beef cut at any given time.

The goal is to have charred slices of beef that will then be cut up into even smaller strips post cooking. The meat will be served with vegetables and noodles so an intense flavor is desired, thus marinading post-slicing. Also, a drier texture is desired which means drenching it in sauce would not be the most wanted solution.

Yes, the larger surface area is so that it will not fall through the grate while grilling. I have experimented with grilling grates, etc., but they do not last very long and do not achieve the desired effect.

I am using a slicer due to the volume of meat, and because it is faster and easier.

A griddle helps alleviate the problem of falling through the cracks, but does not provide the right "char" texture as putting the meat directly on a grill.

I hope this feedback is helpful, and thank you everyone for your help.

Mar 01, 2012
mahi03 in Home Cooking

Slicing Flap Meat / Flank Steak

Hi all,

I'd like to slice a large amount of flap meat (or flank steak) in a commercial meat slicer for the purpose of marinading them and THEN chargrilling them on a grill. Yes, I know this results in moisture loss, but that is part of the effect.

Unfortunately, cutting against the grain at a 90 degree angle results in thin strips that fall through the grill cracks and are otherwise a pain to deal with. As a result, I believe I would need to slice this meat at a 45 degree angle (or less) in order to get "wider" strips.

Do any of you have a creative way of doing this? Perhaps freeze a half dozen steaks that are stacked in a tiered form such that they enter the meat slicer at an angle? Any other creative methods?

Feb 28, 2012
mahi03 in Home Cooking

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

Thanks! appreciate the feedback.

On #1, I have been seraching for comparables in the market to seek help from, although I have had difficulty identifying such comps. The brewery as suggested by others was a great lead which I will follow up on.

The Cook-chill method seems to be a popular method for most of the steam kettle manufacturers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yLZ9E...). This would seem like a good choice for large varities of kettle products, but less if I would be recombining all the packets at the endpoint. There is however, a soup restaurant in my area (San Francisco) that I will try to seek some help from.

I've reached out to several restaurant supply houses both locally and online who have not yielded any viable solutions, but will continue to dig.

Appreciate the help!

Sep 01, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

To my knowledge, I am unaware of precedent examples utilizing a larger scale production and distribution of frozen meat stock (I am more than happy to share more details to the extent that details are needed).

Given the lack of precedence, I seem to be somewhat limited to commercial equipment reps, and resources such as chowhound, which have kindly suggested micro-breweries and restaurant consultants as potential next steps. There are a myriad of 'similar' applications (home brewing) which may offer solutions which I am exploring. At this point in time, the 'best' solution seems to be the use of steam kettles to cook the stock. And I am still in need of a solution to chill the stock.

Sep 01, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

Thanks! I spoke to a steam kettle rep and they mentioned a blast chiller as well. However, most blast chillers cool items on 12x20 pans. From what I've seen online thus far, blast chillers also dont' seem to accommodate this kind of scale.

Several of the steam kettle manufacturers have cook/chill systems, where the food product is squeezed into bags and then cooled in a tumble chiller. The bagging process seems superfluous given that the bags would just be re-opened back into a stock pot.

Sep 01, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

Yes agreed, after further research I've realized this. I will look into a consultant. Would running cool water through a steam kettle achieve this feat?

Aug 31, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Commerical Scale Vietnamese Iced Coffee Maker

Thanks DAWK and ferret. Very helpful suggestions. I will give it a try.

Aug 30, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

Thank you very much, all great suggestions. I will give some microbreweries a call.

The steam jacketed kettle option seems more and more like it is worth the investment, at least at this current scale.

Will the use of these kettles allow for any easy options for cooling of the liquids to adhere to health requirements?

Aug 30, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

I think the steam jacketed kettle is the route to go, if I grow large enough. Its hard to justify the additional expense of a couple 100 gallon kettles right now until the overall concept is proven profitable, and I may be left extra care with a dozen 150 qt stock pots to produce the stock, at least to start.

Any suggestions on a siphon? I would imagine a 1" food grade hose would be all I need.

Aug 26, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

MikeB3542 - I'll look more into the steam jacketed kettle. The equipment is at a much higher price point and I have no previous experience with it. I'd be cooking multiple stocks so the investment would actually be in 3 100 gallon steam kettles.

srgoodman - Thats an excellent point. I believe all the equipment will have to be NSF certified, It appears Lincoln makes some in the 80qt size which would not be large enough.

Perhaps the easiest solution would be to use a food grade siphon (of some sort), and siphon broth at 140F into food-grade 5 gallon buckets and then immediately frozen in the walk-in freezer.

But I will have to check with the health department on their guidelines for this process...

Aug 26, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

I had not thought of the steam kettle option before. But for 400qts (100 gallons), the steam kettle would cost $10k+ vs. $5 k for 4 18" stock pot ranges and 4 120qt vollrath stockpots with a faucet.

Aug 25, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

Yes, its indeed a commercial venture. Production could well exceed 400qts but I thought I would put that figure out there as I'm not sure additional scale would make a difference in the discussion.

I would be using commercial 18" stock pot ranges in the 90,000 BTU range. As I'll be simmering stock, I never intend to hit boiling point, only a simmering point.

The entire simmering process will take 8+ hours, so I'm willing to be patient bringing that volume of liquid to a boil.

But as I will be purchasing 10-12 of these 120-150qt stock pots, which range in price from $120-$1k, the difference in financial investment is material. However if a heavier duty, better stock pot exist that can help with the clarity of the stock, I would be willing to spend the extra capital.

Don't think the ice-bath will be logistically feasible at this scale. Perhaps just add cold/ice water to the broth as the final step. I might have to consider spigots/faucets which will allow the broth to drain into 5 gallon buckets for storage/transport and to lighten the load, or the use of a siphon/pump to transport stock from the pot to the bucket.

Watacetti - you got it, a giant ladle/skimmer

All of the responses have been very helpful, please let me know your thoughts.

Aug 25, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

Thanks Quine,

The ultimate goal is production of stock in the 400qt per day range, so a slow cooker would unfortunately not be an option. The freezing method is most certainly interesting! However, waiting for a 100qt block of broth to melt could take a few days.

Aug 24, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Stock Pot Quality vs. Meat Stock Clarity

In cooking a beef stock and following all the golden rules (cold water to simmer blanching, cold water rinse and simmer) does the material/quality of the stock pot make a significant impact in the clarity of the resulting product?

Online, a 100qt stock pot ranges in prices online from $100 to $500+. What makes one stock pot superior to another? Are there advantages to aluminum over stainless steel?

I was told a rumor that certain stock pots result in a clearer beef stock. Is there any truth to this assertion?

Thanks!

Aug 24, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Commerical Scale Vietnamese Iced Coffee Maker

Thanks ferret,

I will give it a shot. I've also hear an infusion brewer creates a close product but I'm not sure I want to make the investment just to "try".

Aug 24, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Commerical Scale Vietnamese Iced Coffee Maker

Joe,

That is very helpful feedback. I appreciate it.

Aug 19, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware

Commerical Scale Vietnamese Iced Coffee Maker

Hi all,

I am looking for a way to produce Vietnamese Iced Coffee on a commercial and efficient scale (100+ cups a day). Traditional Vietnamese restaurants typically use a phin filter (http://www.vietnamese-coffee.com/brew...) to produce individual orders. This is a time consuming process but allows the flavor to truly come out.

Do any of you know of a way to produce such coffee at much greater quantities? Is there a gigantic phin filter available or is there a way to produce the same flavor/essence of coffee via a commercial machine?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Aug 16, 2010
mahi03 in Cookware