kaleokahu's Profile

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Stovetop Cooking: by temperature or power?

Hi, Duffy:

I associate LED displays with a weak blue color, hence tubercular. But I understand that is not so ubiquitous as it once was.

I think simmering is not the aptest general case for this subject, since most cooks start with the amp at 11 and then adjust by Braille anyway. However, I just find it easier (and more fun) to adjust by flame height than watching a numerical display. You may like it the other way around.

Now, I will grant you that, for *repeatability*, if you know that "47" equates with a good simmer in the daily 1G batch of stock in the same pan, dialing that number in near the boil would be precise. But I still would consider it a paint-by-numbers exercise, Luddite that I am.

Happy LD to you, too.

Aloha.
Kaleo

PS: Actually, on the woodstove, I do move the pan to the spot where my hand tells me is right. Hand first, then move.

about 6 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Tin-lined copper + Caramel sauce= whoopsy?

Hi, Tim:

Freakin hot, yet cools faster than solid brass or iron. I don't know, I'm still waiting to hear a better answer!

Aloha,
Kaleo

about 6 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

95%: Cookware

Maybe 50%. Braises, sautes, poaches and deep dish baked preps are gonna be tough...

about 6 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Stovetop Cooking: by temperature or power?

Hi, sue:

So you set a number and then watch the food, and adjust as necessary.

On gas, I adjust the flame to the height I want it, and then watch both the flame and the food. On wood/coal, it's the flat of my hand, and move the pan. No need to wear readers or wear out my index finger poking buttons.

I didn't use the word 'sensual', but it sorta fits. I just prefer cooking feeling the heat, smelling the woodsmoke, etc. 'Analog' doesn't captue it well either, maybe Old School?

Aloha,
Kaleo

about 6 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Tin-lined copper + Caramel sauce= whoopsy?

Hi, Tim:

Why the copper handle? I've never gotten an authoritative answer to that. My guess is that the tubular handle actually stays cooler than would a solid brass or iron one.

The rounded bottom would be a pain, except it fits into the lid holes on my woodstove.

Aloha,
Kaleo

about 7 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware
1

"New Revereware"

Shoots, kailuagirl:

'Ole, I'm in Seattle. Can you measure and weigh a saucepan for me?

Pololei, this older RW was thought to be dakine in the 1950s, so your parents' makana was very generous. I couldn't get rid of my makuahine's for a long time.

Aloha Kaua,
Kaleo

about 12 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Tin-lined copper + Caramel sauce= whoopsy?

Hi, staubfan:

It's all good. A little smear here and there is no big deal.

Here're 2 pics of a Dehillerin sucriere from an earlier era.

Aloha,
Kaleo

about 12 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Stovetop Cooking: by temperature or power?

Hi, Ray:

What do you mean by magnetized "feel"? Sensing the heat from the empty pan works in a way, e.g., for fried eggs. But if you're waiting to see from the food if the setting is off, the food can easily be off. This is OK with pancakes, less so with sauces, steaks, etc.

Aloha,
Kaleo

about 15 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Keuring Coffee Pirates Break the Code

Send in the IP lawyers.

about 15 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Are Plate Chargers Passé?

I don't know about passe, but I have no use for chargers. I do have a rattan set, but dislike them greatly. Either too big or too small, and they boost the plate too high. Frankly, I'd rather deal with placemats for all but formal settings.

about 15 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

I hope you ordered ones that fit well. If they don't, they can be dangerous. I have a brass-handled frypan that sports one, and it is a hand saver.

IMO, A-C handles are like shaking hands with some practical joker who you know wears a buzzer. Making them wear a glove is better, I suppose...

about 18 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Fry Pan - what is the most practical size?

Smart man. And you needn't worry over crowding your Childean mushrooms.

about 18 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Stovetop Cooking: by temperature or power?

Hi, Ray:

I suggest that the real answer to your question can be found (that is, learned) not in the hob, but in the food.

As you note, settings are often at least one step removed from complete sensory perception. Gas is the most directly perceived, followed by solid tops and the conventional electrics. With all of these, your hand held over the hob and the glow gives a personal baseline perception, the memory of which can be taken from hob to hob, appliance to appliance.

A lot less so, though, with induction. There, you're more beholden to the tubercular glow of digital display, and less able to use your sense perception. I won't go so far as to say you're cooking blind, but it is this loss that causes me to consider induction cooking somewhat soulless.

Now, this flight-by-numbers is perfectly fine if you've got *your* particular, semi-unique appliance/pan/prep/setting dialed in from experience, but there's little you can take with you if you move to using another kit. You're left with learning anew what setting variable in the equation is optimal on the next appliance. I find this vexing; I'd prefer just judging by the flame visually and with my hand.

My sense of the induction temp/mode settings in following recipes is that they'd be great if the author had exactly the same kit as the reader. Otherwise not so much.

Aloha,
Kaleo

about 19 hours ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Tin-lined copper + Caramel sauce= whoopsy?

I think you are OK, with no damage done. How was the sauce?

Little-known fact: The faster you heat your sugar to caramelize it, the higher the temp that is necessary. This is because sugar does't really melt--it decomposes. This is the reason why different scientists claim different temperatures. Heat fast, and you can be around 160C/336F. Mind you, you're still well below tin's melting point. But at the bottom of a pile of sugar (a good insulator, being all carbon) it can get a lot hotter.

This uncertain flirtation with too much heat is why traditional confectioners' pans are unlined. I suspect it's also why some preserve recipes call for warming the sugar before you bring the fruit/sugar mix to a boil.

Aloha,
Kaleo

1 day ago
kaleokahu in Cookware

Fry Pan - what is the most practical size?

To each her own.

Aug 27, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Fry Pan - what is the most practical size?

I guess we differ about "necessary". I can fry a whole pound of bacon all jumbled up in a 10-inch frypan, but won't unless I have no alternative.

My issue with frying-on-the walls is that there's almost no fat there. It's a little like some of your french fries poking out of the oil. ;)

Aug 27, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Mistakes, I've made a few

Hi, CJ:

The problem with light CI is that it means thin. And thin CI means hot-spotting. Among other things, such as fragility.

Making matters worse is CI's vaunted heat-holding ability. It doesn't just go away if you cut the thickness some. This is why CI is sometimes classified architecturally and industrially as an insulating material.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 27, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Fry Pan - what is the most practical size?

Hi, Duffy:

I'm more on billieboy's side on this one. In most frypans, IMO, there's too great a temp differential to make it worthwhile.

About the only thing I "fry" on a frypan's walls are the ends of the outside bacon strips that won't fit on the pan's floor. More accurately, I just *park* them there until the next spin of bacon roulette.

What do you like to cook on the sidewalls rather than in a larger pan?

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 27, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

That Time Anthony Bourdain Scared Kids with the Gay, and I Laughed

Everyone! Back to work. Unless you want people to think you're... Nah, carry on.

Aug 27, 2014
kaleokahu in Features
1

What's in my knife block

Hi, Robert:

Herr und Frau, Wahine a Kaleo should have been cast in a kitchen version of Trading Spouses. Our galley is open 24/7/365 and there always seem to be knives sitting about!

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 26, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

"New Revereware"

Hi, Angelus:

A machinist's ruler or scale in the pic would help, no? All I know is I've never handled ANY Revereware that was at all weighty. Since there's no mistaking the heft of a 2mm copper bottom, I've concluded that the amount in even the early RW is scant. Still waiting for proof I'm wrong.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 26, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

Hi, Ray:

+1 on the Thermoclad triply. I was comped one of the skillets to evaluate, and it's a solid line. 2mm aluminum core, and very ergonomic handle. W-S claims the aluminum alloy is higher conductivity. Excellent value.

This is obviouly house-branded W-S, but it is made by Meyer's Hestan division at their factory in Italy.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 26, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Best pots/pans?

Hi, Duffy:

I think it only means really good triply, e.g., W-S Thermoclad, uses a higher-conductivity alloy which will bond. W-S brags that its alloy is "up to 30% more..." Makers exaggerate *up*, not down,
when it comes to layers.

Everyone thinks all aluminum is the same. However, I think most alloys in clad fall short of plain 'ol cast aluminum, as used in Guardian, etc.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 25, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

recommendations in Lake Chelan

There is a chef-owned pizzaria, called Local Myth. IMO, it's not very good, but it's the best in the area.

Do not go to Chelan with high food expectations. Vin du Lac and the Apple Cup diner are the only 2 places worth anything, in my book. Tavern food in Manson is passable.

Good Luck.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 25, 2014
kaleokahu in Pacific Northwest

Russia considers state monopoly on wine production

All part of the Kleptocratic plan, Komrads!

Aug 25, 2014
kaleokahu in Wine

Best pots/pans?

Hi, Duffy:

Yes aluminum alloys vary widely in conductivity. That's a big reason for all the multi-layer stuff. I gather that pure aluminum does not bond well to SS, whereas some alloys do bond well to both. IMO, this is also the real reason why some multiclad lines have silver interleaved in them.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 25, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

"New Revereware"

Hi, zackly: "Let's not get too nostalgic about Reverware [sic] ...They were never very good to begin with."

Yes. I grew up cooking with my mom's 1950s RW, and the pans are so light there's ZERO chance any of them had 2mm of copper. In fact, I doubt any were 2mm thick TOTAL.

As Americana go, RW is OK, but that's about all.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 25, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Best pots/pans?

Hi, mikie:

One of the first things they teach law students about patents is that if you write the application narrowly enough, they're both easier to obtain and likely worthless. In other words, a very narrow process patent makes for good advertising ("Patented!") and that's about it.

The thing that amazes me about the secrecy of pan makers is the witholding of the thickness specs of the layers. You'd think it's a matter of national security, when in fact, all a competitor would need to do is saw a pan to find out. The better bet is they don't want anyone publicizing to consumers how little good stuff they put inside their wares.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 25, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Best pots/pans?

Hi, Ray:

I was aware of those features, called ControlInduc and Silvinox. However, they could just as well be included in triply and 5-layer. Again, I'm challenging anyone to convince me 7 layers are any better than 3 or 5.

Aloha,
Kaleo

Aug 24, 2014
kaleokahu in Cookware

Mistakes, I've made a few

Ever try a sad iron? Heavy, thick, flat and solid cast iron.