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"Modern" Food Ideas?

Take your students out for Uno's or Due's.

Then, in class, discuss the hamburger. The first mass-portable food and a simple variant of the sandwich.

Go through White Castle, the Whopper, the Big Mac, to demonstrate evolution.

Show the Egg McMuffin as a deviant variant and wraps as a further deviant.

Working from this skeleton, so to speak, you can create a family tree of modern food and try most of it at America's iconic source of obesity.

Jul 17, 2013
snootcity in Chicago Area

"A man's drink of choice , tells volumes of one's character"-- need help..

Order a Bloody Mary. Ask your bartender what he or she makes best because you are he or she is your "liiquid" chef.

It tells your competition you are better then them while drunk whien they are sober. Rock solid gin and tonics also work.

If you can grab the drink with your fist rather than with fancy finger work (like the martini) you won't spill it by accident.

Make sure to perform, though. Make sure to perform.

May 04, 2012
snootcity in Spirits

Jimmies Hotdogs reopens in Aurora.

It appears to be among the Michigan members of the Coney family...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan...

Jun 26, 2011
snootcity in Chicago Area

Jimmies Hotdogs reopens in Aurora.

I think Jimmies might be of the Coney family...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coney_Is...

Jun 26, 2011
snootcity in Chicago Area

Jimmies Hotdogs reopens in Aurora.

Jimmies Hotdogs, which opened in 1926 and closed in 1969, reopened in Aurora, Illinois, on Saturday, June 25th. It is open every day during the warm months of the year (as it used to be) from 11am to 8pm.

The website is crude -- www.jimmies-hotdogs.com. Jimmies (yes, no apostrophe) is a truck vendor and an Aurora classic. The truck is now operated by Jimmy's daughter. It is parked on Illinois Avenue, about one-third mile east of Orchard Road.

I'm 54 and my dad regularly took me to Jimmies until they closed. My dad lived near the original site of the truck near Aurora's Garfield Park, and ate at Jimmies from the time he could get to the truck. I remember always getting two dogs and a box of popcorn everytime I went.

Jimmies site has some mumbo jumbo about their unique tasting sauce. I do not know what is in it, but is seems to be a finely textured chili sauce. I've never had a dog like it anywhere else.

Jun 25, 2011
snootcity in Chicago Area

Best sandwich I ever invented

I wish I had invented the best sandwich ever but someone else beat me to it. Thanks to Chowhounder otis738 for sharing...
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/753262

Jan 21, 2011
snootcity in Home Cooking

Pagliai's Poor Boy recipe on Home Cooking (thanks otis738).

Hello,

The recipe for the UIUC Pagliai's poor boy has been posted to the Home Cooking board under...
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/753262

We'd like to give great thanks to Chowhounder otis738 who provided the keys to recreating the recipe at...
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/118771
and would appreciate otis738's comments on this extraordinary rendition.

Dec 14, 2010
snootcity in Chicago Area

UIUC Pagliai's poor boy reconstructed.

Yes, step fifteen is to put the faces together.

A long loaf of baguet-shaped crispy Italian bread will do. Look for a somewhat medium diameter loaf or you'll have a hard time getting the sandwich in your mouth (although the taste will be the same).

I hope you enjoy preparing and eating the poor boy.

Dec 14, 2010
snootcity in Home Cooking

UIUC Pagliai's poor boy reconstructed.

Dear Moderators,

We know this post will be moved to a cooking board somewhere.
But if possible, please leave it for a day or two to broadcast,
because we wish to offer great thanks to Chowhounder otis738.

otis738's original post: is here...
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/118771

Our message to otis738 is this..
After years of trying we've finally gotten it. If you have any edits,
please provide them.

We await your reply and thank you again for recovering the deliciousness.

With respects we offer our rendition....

Pagliai's UIUC Poor Boy, resurrected
--------------------------------------------------
Time: About fifteen years and 25 minutes
Serves: Perhaps two

Although the poor boy described here vanished decades ago when
the Urbana, Illinois, Pagliai's Pizzeria closed its doors, we --
two former UIUC students -- still remember its uniquely tangy
taste. Now, after more than fifteen years of reminiscing, baking,
tweaking, and baking again, we finally have reproduced the
sandwich in all of its authentic glory.

Our version begins with a pair of open-faced sandwiches, one a
sausage pizza, the other ham and cheese on garlic bread. Both are
baked until browned and piping hot, topped with shredded lettuce
and Russian dressing, combined, and consumed. Cheap ingredients
make for better results, so they appear first in our list.

In the end, this poor boy's secrets were dislodged from the mind
of a UIUC grad who constructed countless renditions of the greasy
treat as a Pagliai's employee twenty-five years ago. We found
him following a relentless Internet hunt and were surprised to
discover pizza sauce and garlic butter in the mix. And the
clincher? The prep calls for baking the sandwiches open-faced
rather than closed-and-foil-wrapped, and topping them with
lettuce and dressing at the moment of final assembly.

To properly render the complete dining experience, prior to
enjoying your first bite rummage through your attic, find your
old bong, and take it for a test drive. Just remember, home
delivery no longer is available. So head to your kitchen and fire
up that oven now!

One 16-inch, day-old, Gonnella Vienna torpedo loaf
One stick (four ounces) margarine or butter
Two teaspoons garlic powder or 4 teaspoons minced garlic
Six ounces canned, jarred, or homemade pizza sauce
1/2-pound steamed, baked, or roasted ham slices
1/2-pound slightly thick cotto salami slices
1/2-pound part-skim or whole milk mozzarella slices
Two cups shredded iceberg lettuce
10 teaspoons Russian, French, or Catalina salad dressing
Two large foil sheets to bake and wrap each sandwich

(1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
(2) Halve the loaf, then split the halves into two faces.
(3) Soften oil over low heat in pan and combine with garlic.
(4) On each foil sheet, set two faces side-by-side.
(5) Slather garlic oil on first face of each sheet.
(6) Slather pizza sauce on second face of each sheet.
(7) Layer ham, 3/4-slice overlap, on oiled faces.
(8) Layer salami, 3/4-slice overlap, on sauced faces.
(9) Layer mozzarella, 3/4-slice overlap, on all faces.
(10) Place faces on foil in oven.
(11) Bake 15 minutes or until hot and crust browns.
(12) Remove faces with foil from oven.
(13) Top one face of each pair with 3/4-inch lettuce.
(14) Drizzle lettuced faces with 5 teaspoons dressing each.
(15) Sandwich faces, wrap in foil, and lightly compress.
(16) Unwrap and serve.

Dec 13, 2010
snootcity in Home Cooking

Pizzeria oven temperatures database <== U.S. / World

Hello,

With apologoes to ZZ Top, I suggest we collect a database, later to be analyzed, of the oven temperatures of pizzerias.

My second favorite, Gario's, in Aurora, Illinois, runs at 550 degrees, for example. Not too hot, but the crust can get crispy.

Database format? (Keep the database simple but expandable.)

Pizzaria name / nation / city / oven temperature

(Additions to the format could include type and brand of oven, type and brand of fuel, texture of crust, and so forth. And the character used to separate entries ("/" in the previous) can be changed. The character does not matter, as software can organize the data if different types of data are properly seperated and the character separating the entries remains consistent.)

Delicious investigative reporting!

Jul 25, 2010
snootcity in General Topics

Inside-out sushi roll nation of origin?

Maybe the chef called inside-out rolls "obake-makimono" because they are white outside, like a ghost.

Jul 19, 2010
snootcity in General Topics

Inside-out sushi roll nation of origin?

It appears "ura-maki" refers either to the entire category of inside-out rolls or is American translation into Japanese of the Enlish words. Further, it appears the Japanese call the things "ka-shuu-maki," translating as the "ka" (California), "shuu," (state), "maki," (roll).

(The Japanese also refer to California as "karifounia" and the noun is written in a syllabic script called "katakana, which is used for, among other things, representing most foreign words and italicized material." (Katakana note not for you, Silverjay!))

As an additional note, when we were out of nori at our home, my mom would take freshly cooked rice, wet her hands with a little warm salted water, and press small, round handfuls of it into rice balls for snacking. She would stuff some of those balls with pickled plum paste (umeboshi), pickles (oshinko), steamed spinach, and other nibbles. So rice can be formed around something and eaten naked. And that perhaps is where the American sushi chef from Japan rolled up his "new" idea and popularized sushi in the United States.

Jul 18, 2010
snootcity in General Topics

Inside-out sushi roll nation of origin?

Hello,

I've read the Japanese term for an inside-out roll is "uramaki" and that it was invented by a Japanese chef in Los Angeles in 1973 to hide the nori since Western palates were not accustomed to it at that time.

Is the uramaki form native to the United States or does it have its origins in Japan. It seems reasonable to believe such a simple item has to be Japanese.

Thank you.

Jul 17, 2010
snootcity in General Topics

Sushi bar "ledge" <== Need Japanese word for this.

This is a great twist on my original post! You suggest the ledge *is* the counter. And the counter, where diners rest their elbows, is the thing going unnamed. A thing that came *after* the ledge and brought with it seats for the previously standing patrons.

Since the counter area, where the plates and drinks and oshibori might be, is perhaps the most recent addition to the sushi bar, the question becomes this: The chef prepares on the "tsukeba" and the patron eats standing from the "tsukedai": What is the name of the recently added counter area for those plates and drinks and oshibori that were added once sushi got fashionable?

Jul 08, 2010
snootcity in Japan

Sushi bar "ledge" <== Need Japanese word for this.

Hoy!

Now that we have all of these (katakana) "countahs," it appears the chef works at the "tsukeba" and places food on the raised ledge called a "tsukedai."

So, what is the name of the counter where you have your plates,
drinks, chopsticks, oshibori, and elbows?

Thank you!

Jul 07, 2010
snootcity in Japan

Sushi bar "ledge" <== Need Japanese word for this.

I am confused. Observe PDF from Hokkaido regarding sushi...
http://tinyurl.com/2vad9kn
It refers to the tsukedai as the plate (which can be a geta), but the reference number in the image lands squarely on the ledge.

Jul 02, 2010
snootcity in Japan

Sushi bar "ledge" <== Need Japanese word for this.

Would you be so kind as to disambiguate this for me? Are tsukedai and tsukejou synonymous? That is, does tsukejou also refer to the ledge? And, if possible, could you post the kanji for tsukejou (if you can't, is the kanji for "jou" the kanji for "ue" or the kanji for what word? I'll even take a radical and a total stroke count.)

Thank you!

Jul 02, 2010
snootcity in Japan

Sushi bar "ledge" <== Need Japanese word for this.

Hello,

When you sit at a sushi bar, you face the seafood cooler and have a counter in front of you with your plates and chopsticks and so forth.

Between your counter and the cooler is a raised ledge, where the sushi chef will serve you, and from which you will pluck the goodies. What is the Japanese word for this ledge? (If you can paste kanji into your reply, what, if any, kanji represent this ledge?)

Thank you!

Jun 27, 2010
snootcity in Japan

Sushi bar "ledge" <== Need Japanese word for this.

Hello,

When you sit at a sushi bar, you face the seafood cooler and have a counter in front of you with your plates and chopsticks and so forth.

Between your counter and the cooler is a raised ledge, where the sushi chef will serve you, and from which you will pluck the goodies. What is the Japanese word for this ledge? (If you can paste kanji into your reply, what, if any, kanji represent this ledge?)

Thank you!

Jun 25, 2010
snootcity in Not About Food

The ledge.

Hello,

When you sit at a sushi bar, you face the seafood cooler and have a counter in front of you with your plates and chopsticks and so forth.

Between your counter and the cooler is a raised ledge, where the sushi chef will serve you, and from which you will pluck the goodies. What is the Japanese word for this ledge? (If you can paste kanji into your reply, what, if any, kanji represent this ledge?)

Thank you!

Paul

Jun 24, 2010
snootcity in Not About Food