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echinoderminator's Profile

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Looking for Chanterelles in East Bay

I read through some of it but found no reference to wild mushrooms. Can you copy and paste the part that is relevant?

Edit: I read the "Do and Don'ts" in the link. I don't see any mention of mushrooms. It talks about wreaths, cut flowers, green vegetaion, fruits and vegetables. Technically, mushrooms are not a vegetable. The moth has nothing to do with mushrooms.

Looking for Chanterelles in East Bay

The chanterelles being sold in the bay area this time of year are from the bay area.
Can you post the specific link to the quarantine please.
I can understand Chernobyl mushrooms being quarantined but edibles in ca is just an example of an immature food culture.

Looking for Chanterelles in East Bay

I don't quite understand your quarantine view. The mushrooms you are getting at the farmers market, Berkeley Bowl and Monterey Market are very often picked in the East Bay Hills. For those that get poison oak - they make their choice. My friends that get it use technu and latex gloves, seems to work fairly well. More relevant than them being quarantined is the fact that if you are caught by the EBRPD cops then you will get a $200 fine, for me that is just part of the fun. The mushrooms are beautiful and delicious because they want to be eaten.
Nothing gets better than going out in the hills, sweating your guts out, breathing good clean air and coming home with a bounty.
Very often the mushrooms supplied to the markets are just not processed correctly. When I get home with a batch, they are cleaned with water and then set out to "cure". Once the water content is down to the right level, they are ready for proper cooking.

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Berkeley Bowl
2020 Oregon St, Berkeley, CA 94703

Looking for Chanterelles in East Bay

We have several boletes in California that can be called porcini - Boletus edulis, B. aureus, B regius, B. appendiculatus, B. rex-veris and B. barrowsii - to name a few. The way they are dried makes a difference in my opinion - ventilation with no added heat is my preferred method. Quality fresh mushrooms processed with care will become quality dried. The various species mentioned above are all unique in flavor to the discerning taste buds but all have the robust porcini flavor in general.
South Africa is exporting the highest quality fresh porcini at this time - tons of worm free buttons.
Chile has some dried boletes that utilize heat generated from burning wood in their drying process and they are amazingly good.
If the boletes you had can be described as sublime - my guess is that preparation was sublime and not the mushrooms.

Looking for Chanterelles in East Bay

The best place to get chanterelles in the East Bay is where they grow - amongst Coast Live Oak. This year isn't as good as last year but still serious poundage can be found if one is willing to put forth the effort. I went today with a couple of friends around Moraga and we found about 10 lbs - last year we would have found ten times that.

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

Went up Saturday and loaded up on Spring Kings and Red Capped Butter Boletes - (Boletus regius)

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

also east of Watsonville (manznita at edges of mixed forest), Sierra foothills, below 4000ft. (madrone), Sonoma Coast (tanoak), San Mateo (tanoak) - they must be on Mt Tam.

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

closest areas I know are San Mateo County and just east of San Jose - I would imagine Mt Tam has potential. They like ericaceous plants.

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

The Berkeley Bowl or Monterey Market are two reliable sources - is that what you mean? I've never found matsutake growing in the Bay Area if that is what you mean.

They begin fruiting in late September in the Pacific NW and continue fruiting in various locations into december generally.

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Berkeley Bowl
2020 Oregon St, Berkeley, CA 94703

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

spring kings have arrived!

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

Let's not forget BAMS...
http://www.bayareamushrooms.org/

BTW - Larry Stickney passed away June 12th - he'll be missed by many shroomers.

I first met him when I was 10 yrs old - I found some Agaricus californicus in my backyard in Alameda and my parents, having read a recent article in the SF examiner that featured Larry, brought me and my agaricus over to Larry's house in Oakland and he identified them for me.
Years later I called Larry out of the blue and said "hey Larry, I hear Craterellus cornucopioides is fruiting in the Pacific Northwest - wanna join me for a road trip?" we found alot of mushrooms on that little trip.

Rest in Peace Larry.

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

Currently morels are fruiting above 6,500 ft elevation. Hwy's 4, 108, 120, 88, 50, etc. Look for areas that have been logged recently. Burn areas are famously good but the logged areas are great and widespread in our National Forests. Campgrounds are also good places to look. I think if I were to be targeting morels right now I would head up Hwy 4 or Hwy 108. To find the areas take the little roads that wander off into the boonies.

Boletus rex-veris is what I have been targeting lately. Spring Kings!

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

I hope these photos can post!

2010 Bay Area mushroom hunting report

Greetings to all - my first post here. I'm passionate about food and hunting for delicasies helps those morsels taste even better! The Bay Area chanterelle season usually goes from November through March.

This years Golden Chanterelle season was phenomenal....
[IMG]http://i764.photobucket.com/albums/xx...
[IMG]http://i764.photobucket.com/albums/xx...
[IMG]http://i764.photobucket.com/albums/xx...
[IMG]http://i764.photobucket.com/albums/xx...

The Morel season is also very very good this year - the 4 - 5,000 ft area is over but 5 - 6,000 ft
is really good!
[IMG]http://i764.photobucket.com/albums/xx...
[IMG]http://i764.photobucket.com/albums/xx...

Now I'm just waiting on the Spring Kings to come into force - they are late this year due to our precipitous and cold spring.