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chicken heart recipes that don't involve grilling?

Om nom nom, this sounds good too! About how long do you fry them per side? Also, when you don't eat them straight out of the pan, do you have particular sides that you like to serve them with?

Nov 01, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

chicken heart recipes that don't involve grilling?

Ha, yeah, I guess I should specified that when I say "recipe," I really mean more along the lines of what you wrote, as I rarely use recipes myself. (Although if anyone has any straight recipes, I'd be happy for those too.) So this sounds basically like a braising technique. Do you ever brown the giblets before adding the liquid and simmering? Do you ever find that evaporating the liquid and browning them toughens the hearts? I've heard that's what you need to watch out for with chicken hearts.

Also, what do you tend to serve them with?

Nov 01, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

chicken heart recipes that don't involve grilling?

Curiosity got the better of me today at the farmer's market and I got a bag of chicken hearts, which I've never tried cooking before. Most of the recipes I've looked at involving grilling them on skewers which sounds fabulous, but I don't have a grill. Does anyone have any good recipes involving them that I can make in my kitchen?

Oct 31, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Stock to make Stock?

Go for it! Then you'll be making a "double stock"--it's a very old, classical technique. I've never done it, despite being a stock fiend (I've got chicken, turkey, beef, and pork stock in the freezer right now, and bones and scraps for fish and lamb stock to be made soon) but I'm sure it's delicious. It'll save storage space too.

Oct 17, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Does this apply to the stinky one, the okay one or both?

Oct 17, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Yeah, I think I'm just about at that point where I'm declaring it a lost cause. Now I just want to do all that I can to make sure that the second one doesn't go the same way. Are starters gone wrong just something that happens sometimes or is it because you're doing something wrong? My biggest question now is to feed or not to feed the second one (that still smells fine and is really bubbly) tonight, since I'm concerned that the first one went bad due to not-frequent enough feedings. But I don't want to "overfeed" this one either, in case that's possible. And I don't know if I should be discarding some with each feeding or not--the internet definitely disagrees with itself on that one. :-P

Oct 17, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Wow, so now I have a new problem...or is it? I have two containers of starter going right now (one them was started a day later, first one is at the end of Day 3, second one at the end of Day 2) and the first one has smelled absolutely terrible since last night. I'm talking vomit-smell, have-to-psych-myself-up-to-sniff-it bad! (Sorry to be graphic.)

I've heard some people say that ferments can go through phases where they smell awful but then the trouble-making bacteria will die off and the good stuff will take over. Is that what's going on here? Until last night, it had a sweet, ferment-y smell that was not at all unpleasant and it was frothing and bubbling so much I almost expected it to talk. Then things changed...fast. I'm concerned that I might have starved it--the directions I'm following say to feed once a day but maybe that's not often enough, considering how active it seemed. The second starter is also super active right now--it has increased in volume quite a bit since it's morning feeding and has the same sweet, pungent smell that Number One had before it got nasty. Should I give it a snack tonight instead of waiting until morning? If the first one is doomed, I want to save this one from the same fate! Can you overfeed a developing starter?

Also, the directions I'm following don't say anything about discarding any starter while you're developing it--it says to only start doing that once you get to the maintenance phase. Other sources seem to disagree and, intuitively, it makes sense to me that you would have to discard some before each feeding because, the more you add, the more it's going to need to eat and I could be swimming in the stuff pretty soon.

Advice? Thanks to everyone who's responded so far! I'm a little afraid to post on dedicated bread-making boards right now because I know I'm not really doing this with the proper gear so I feel like people are just going to say "go away until you have a kitchen scale." :-P Maybe they'd be right but I hope not...

Oct 17, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

I mean, I don't know what qualifies as "highly chlorinated." It certainly tastes fine to drink. And, yeah, it was only a little bit--probably a spoonful at the absolute most, since a few drops would have gotten in with each rinse.

And, yeah, I'm definitely planning on cutting down on the volume once I get this going. The recipe I'm following tells me to add almost a cup of flour a day for 5 days! That's going to be a lot of starter! The thing is, I don't know how to cut back--how to make sure it has enough to eat but not end up swimming starter!

Oct 16, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Meat pie recipe?

Do you want to stick to a "pie-shaped" pie? Or are Cornish pasties an option? Every time I make those, they're a big hit.

Oct 16, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Good to know--I was actually worried about "overwhelming" it with new flour and water before it got started but the impression I'm getting here and around the internet is that feeding it a little too soon is better than feeding it a little too late. Is that about right?

Oct 16, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Ha! It does smell a little boozy, come to think of it. :-P

What I actually ended up doing was scraping the blue stuff off to the best of my ability and feeding it again. I also mixed up a new starter in a different container, just to cover my bases. I'm glad to hear that the first one is probably fine, although it might take some time to recover, since it lost some of it's volume from the scraping.

One thing though...without thinking about it, I kept on rinsing the spoon I was using for scraping under the tap, so a tiny bit of tap water probably got in (I've been using bottled spring water.) Maybe this is a very silly concern, but did I kill it?

Man, it's been ages since I felt this unsure of myself in the kitchen!

Oct 16, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Thanks for the recommendation--I'm not familiar with those forums but I think I'll need all the help I can get. lol.

Oct 16, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

Thanks for the help so far, everyone. I checked on it this morning to feed it and it was tinged with blue on top. :-( I'm guessing that means I should just chuck it and start again? It's really just a tinge and it still just smells like flour, not mold, but the color definitely looks off. And there isn't enough starter in there yet for there to really be a "top" I can scrape off. It's a shame because I wanted to take advantage of all of this warm spell, which is only predicted to last through Saturday--then it's back down to the 50s, although my house generally stays in the 60s in the fall (still a little too cold for yeast, apparently.) As it is, I'm a little worried that, if I manage to make this thing, I'm not going to be able to use it because it's going to be too cold!

On the other other, maybe the problem yesterday was that it was too warm. It did get up to 80, which I read is a little warmer than ideal. Part of the reason I've stayed away from yeast is that it just seems too hard to control the temperature to the satisfaction of these finicky creatures. :-P

Oh well--at least this time I can get the ratio right?

Oct 16, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Meals for Family Struggling with Illness

Yes, definitely soups and stews. Pureed soups are wonderful with good bread and hearty enough to make a meal of too. I just made a good curried parsnip and apple soup. Butternut squash would be good too.

Also, this isn't really a thing to pair with bread but what about something like red beans and rice? Good, savory dish that's easy to make in quantity, keeps and reheats well, and tends to be a hit with a lot of people with a range of palates. Same goes for chana masala, dal etc. if Indian does turn out to be their thing.

And then there's tacos--make a meat and/or bean filling and send it over with tortillas and fixings. Everyone puts together their own and the pickier folks can avoid things they don't like. When making the filling, it's usually pretty easy to add plenty of spices and seasonings to half of it and leave those things out for the other half, for people who like things blander.

Oct 15, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Can anyone help i have a picky 11 year old who is also a pescatarian?

With the "no sauces" thing, is it the flavor of sauces that he tends to dislike or is it more of an aversion to liquid foods? Since you say he also doesn't like curries, soups, and mashed potatoes, it kind of sounds like the latter. So maybe instead of plain fish, you could try different marinades to change it up? Perhaps fish teriyaki (or something similar) with stir-fried vegetables and rice? How about other types of seafood? Clamcakes instead of fishcakes? Or vegetables that are somewhat similar to the ones he already likes, like parsnips or cauliflower?

Anyway, his lack of variety is a bummer but things could be much worse! If you're only going to like a few things, things like fish, carrots and broccoli are good ones to like! Far better than only eating processed junk food and no vegetables. If he is getting bored, maybe that will eventually provide his own motivation to branch out a little more--kids often do when they hit adolescence. And, as another poster said, he's getting old enough to do some experimenting himself.

Oct 15, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking
1

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

I've decided to take advantage of this bout of warm fall weather we're having in my area (it's in the 70s) to make my first sourdough starter. Yeast breads of any kind are a significant gap in my food repetoire--I make great pastries and quick breads but yeast breads have always scared me. But since sourdough breads are my favorite kind to eat, I decided to just skip the commercial yeast packets and go directly to wild yeast!

I'm following this how-to here: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-.... Partly because it's nicely explained, partly because it was just one of first results that popped up. :-P It uses only flour and water, which several people have told me is all you need--I've been told that grapes etc. are unnecessary. (Though several other recipes that I looked at suggested that honey be included. Is this a good idea? I have a nice jar of local honey in my pantry.) What's your experience with this?

Also, I mixed it up this morning and then realized this evening that I managed to make a mistake in pretty much the easiest recipe one could possible imagine: I realized that I used 1/2 cup + 2 tbsp flour, instead of 3/4 cup + 2 tbsp, which means my starter is more watery than I guess it should be. Should I add the extra flour now? Or just add the right proportions tomorrow when I feed it, just to keep to a consistent "feeding schedule?" Any help is appreciated!

Also, before anyone tells me, yes, I know I need to get a kitchen scale. :-P But I don't have one right now and that's not going to change in the next few days so...

Oct 15, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

need help making mushroom powder

I use it in any stew or pasta sauce where I am also using whole mushrooms. It just adds another dimension of mushroominess to the liquid. It's also good in beef stew or other dishes that can always have another boost of umami.

Aug 04, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

need help making mushroom powder

I use a coffee grinder also--cheap and works great!

Aug 04, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

ideas for fresh, uncured pork jowl

Hmmm, how did that turn out? Much of the appeal of bacon to me comes from the salty smokiness and this stuff is fresh and uncured. Did you just eat as is, or use in a dish?

Aug 03, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

ideas for fresh, uncured pork jowl

I picked some up at the farmer's market because it's a cut I've never tried before and I like to experiment. I've been perusing the internet, including some old chowhound threads about what to do with it. I love guanciale but since I have no experience with home-curing (and it would be difficult for me to do in my current housing) I think I'm picking from a few ideas that I've seen repeated in various places, but would like some clarification on:

1.) Slow-cooking without liquid in a slow cooker or crock pot and then shredding--apparently this yields a lot of rendered fat and good taco meat. I wonder, could one make carnitas this way? One thing I have noticed is that people who recommend this technique never mention seasoning the meat with anything. Can this be done with seasoning?

2.)Seasoning with various spices and roasting. This intrigues me but I'd like to know about how it turns out. Do you roast until it is fall apart tender (like the above technique?)or until you can slice it? How do you prefer to eat it?

3.) Braising with liquid, generally with Asian seasonings like soy sauce, fish sauce, rice wine etc. This got me to wondering if pork jowl couldn't be substituted for the pork belly in a Vietnamese pork belly and egg stew like this one: http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/po...

I have never cooked this dish but I've eaten it and it's delicious. I've heard many people say that pork jowl is a lot like pork belly in a lot of ways so I wonder if I couldn't use my jowl in a recipe like this...yum!

Has anybody tried any of these techniques before and have anything to say about them or advice to give? I'm open to some other suggestions too although I do want to stay away from curing. Input greatly appreciated!

Aug 03, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Anyone have a good recipe for Caribbean-style oxtail stew?

This does look really good. When I eat it, usually has carrots and/or potatoes, not beans, although the seasoning here looks about right. (Although possibly sweeter than in my experience.)

Jul 10, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

Mmmm...pasties. The reason I learned to make pastry to begin with (and I also use 50/50 lard/butter.) :-)

Jul 09, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

I often buy leaf fat from the farmer's market and render it myself--it's not difficult but I don't know if this is an option for you. I do know that leaf lard (or leaf fat for rending) can be ordered on line though, if you want to go that far.

I use half lard and half butter when making pie crust, partly to stretch my supply of lard and partly because I think the combinatin gives the best taste and texture for pie crust. I have used butter only for crust before though, when I am cooking for vegetarian or kosher friends and it has also turned out great. I generally use a European butter,since it has a lower water content. And is also delicious. :-)

Jul 09, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking
1

Anyone have a good recipe for Caribbean-style oxtail stew?

I'm not usually much of a recipe person, but if it's a dish I haven't made before, I often peruse different recipes and improvise from there. I'd like to have some tried and true ones to work with to help me turn the beautiful oxtail I just bought at the farmer's market into my all-time favorite dish to get at Jamaican restaurants. (Well, one of my all-time favorites but I can already make the others. This one is the Final Frontier.) Has anyone ever made this dish homemade with good results?

Jul 09, 2014
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

What to do with a package of frozen pork spare ribs...

I'm liking some of these ideas! One thing I am definitely curious about though is how spareribs turn out when braised. They are not super-meaty so they lend themselves very well to barbecue but I have hard time picturing how they would work in a braised dish. Do you pull the meat off the bones (and pitch the bones) before serving or serve them bone-in and cut the meat off the bones at the table with a fork and knife? I would guess that you wouldn't pick them up with your hands like you would when they're barbecued.

Sep 28, 2013
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

What to do with a package of frozen pork spare ribs...

I'm pretty sure they are spare ribs. But I like the idea of using some kind of apple product--I like braise bone-in pork chops in hard cider. I don't know if that would work with these though.

Sep 27, 2013
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Do you cook arugula?

Yes, that is what I do with arugula and pasta--toss it with the hot, drained pasta so it wilts a bit does not lose it's peppery bite. One of my favorite pasta dishes to to make is pasta with arugula, mashed canned sardines, capers, lemon juice, garlic, fresh ground pepper, sometimes red pepper flakes and a whole lot of really good olive oil. Yum!

What to do with a package of frozen pork spare ribs...

that have been kicking around my freezer for a while. I know these are great on the barbecue but, unfortunately, I don't have the space or equipment to barbecue. So does anyone have a good recipe for spare ribs that can be made in the kitchen? A braised dish perhaps? Would it be a waste to make a good pork stock with them? Any ideas welcome!

Sep 27, 2013
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

Getting the most out of fresh pastured eggs

There's also the possibility of eggs in the dish itself and not the pasta. Pasta carbonara with pastured eggs would be YUM!

Aug 09, 2013
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking

What is the absolute worst cookbook you own. And why do you keep it?

I love that site! Mmmm..."jellied beef mold." Doesn't just the name make your tummy rumble? lol

Jul 28, 2013
Lady_Tenar in Home Cooking