a

AnotherMother's Profile

Title Last Reply

What is one tip that you learned about cooking that was simple but made a huge difference? [old]

Quick, yes, but what do you do about the mess of fine bone chips that gets into everything? Even a hacksaw leaves unacceptable bonemeal/fine chips behind. Much better to get patience and a sharp knife and bone it out. It takes a little practice but the finished product is much better.

Jan 17, 2012
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

What is one tip that you learned about cooking that was simple but made a huge difference? [old]

Now that's a clever idea! Supermarket meat is cut stupidly thin here in Australia, but that might just be a way of making it edible.

Jan 17, 2012
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

To heat or not to heat? Help me answer this question!

If your yogurt maker has instructions for unheated yogurt, why not just try it? (and then report back!)

I have made natural yogurt a number of times simply using a yogurt I liked and warm milk, with varying degrees of success. In my experience if you get the temp right, it cultures a whole lot faster and the flavour is more 'true' to the parent starter. The way I understand it, the bacteria need the warmth to grow.

Jan 17, 2012
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Is King Arthur Flour worth the price?

Hmm, my perspective might be a bit different...
When I lived in the States i used to buy KAF whenever possible, as it was the closest to the kind of flour I was used to using in Australia.
So I would say there is a detectable difference, but that it may be a plus or a minus depending on your expectations.
I found it was a little lighter in the end product, and had the 'right' taste for my palate.
Also it had no added salt - some flours from the supermarket seemed to have added salt, which - as a foreigner - I found beyond weird.

Oct 12, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Replacing eggs in baking

I have often used a couple of tablespoons of applesauce as a substitute for eggs in baked goods.
In my case it is generally due to running out of eggs, rather than philosophical or medical causes.

It has always worked very well in standard recipes.

Perhaps you could try again with a recipe you know and trust?

Oct 11, 2011
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Recession-era (both the old and the new) Recipes

I've given this a bit of thought myself, and I am not sure that the 'old' recession recipes will work this time around.
Partly because people don't eat the same way any more (headcheese anyone? A nice bowl of bread and milk?) and partly because what is cheap and good now is not necessarily what was cheap and good last time around.

However I am open to being proven wrong!

What do others think?

Oct 11, 2011
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Cooking Quail Eggs? [moved from General Chounding board]

I think you got a canned quail egg there.
They are easier for the cook, in that they are pre-boiled and pre-peeled. But the down side is a considerable one - canned quail eggs taste vile!
Fresh quail eggs are like a milder version of hens eggs and would not leave you with that unfortunate side-effect.

Oct 11, 2011
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Does anyone else do their vacation souvenir shopping at local grocery stores?

It's the only way to travel - and speaking of travel, if anyone is headed to Japan (or lived there and wants a nostalgia hit) check out this site -

http://japanesesnackreviews.blogspot....

Personally I have a yen for the roast sweet potato flavored kit-kat...

May 15, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Which recipes (and ingredients) are, in your opinion, over hyped?

Sriracha too sweet??
But sriracha has no sugar or sweetener at all, and little acid. Do you mean sweet chili sauce, that syrupy condiment people use with spring rolls (and almost everything else)?

May 14, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Which recipes (and ingredients) are, in your opinion, over hyped?

A polite word in defense of chickens, Eu.
I've kept backyard chickens most of my life.
They are incredibly adept at finding food and can't be 'forced' to eat something. A proper free-range chicken forages widely in search of various tidbits, depending on their mood, the seasons and what's on offer. They are not at all dumb about finding food - it is their livelihood.
Chickens kept in mobile arks ('pastured') eat the greens and bugs they fancy and leave the rest, assuming other food is available.
If the ark is kept in one place too long, eventually everything will be destroyed beneath it, but this is mostly due to vigorous scratching rather than because 'everything' gets eaten.
Laying chickens always get a supplementary diet of grain or prepared food, in any case - the greens are not their only food source.

The yolk of an egg from a chicken that has access to green food is a much brighter yellow (unless the cage bird is being fed colorant, which the cage egg industry does do, to compensate) and tastes much better.

And Harrie - my chickens have always known enough to come into their coop on their own at night, leaving me to shut them safely in at dusk.

May 13, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Muscovy duck eggs?

I was brought up on all sorts of duck eggs, and they are all good to eat!

If the eggs are fresh there should be no problem. Once you have your eggs, wash off the worst of the dirt, and then they will safely keep, refrigerated, for up to two months (longer actually, but two months usually freaks most people out so I'll leave it at that!). Duck eggs have a number of sophisticated mechanisms to keep the developing ducklings safe from bacterial attack, which also serve to keep them fresh for longer than a hen egg. Bacterial contamination of duck eggs is not as common as people think.

But getting back to the thick yolk problem, I have encountered this too. I don't think it is the species of duck, but rather their diet which causes it, because all sorts of ducks have provided eggs like this at one time or another, and I have also had muscovies which rarely, if ever, did.

The eggs are still good to eat, but it is harder to work out when the yolk is cooked properly, which to me is hot but not yet set solid. Like you I prefer my yolks runny!

You are very lucky - where I live duck eggs are $5 for half a dozen, and as I have no ducks anymore I do occasionally indulge, even at that price!

Mar 12, 2011
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Hamburger controversy!

So well put...

Feb 09, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Hamburger controversy!

These mushrooms people keep talking about, they are cooked, aren't they?

Very few mushrooms ever made it onto an Aussie burger!

Feb 09, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Hamburger controversy!

There are two 'beets' - one is beetroot, red, eaten by people, the other is sugarbeet, white, eaten by stock or made into sugar.

To me 'beets' are the stockfood, and beetroot is the tasty red thing.

Sugarbeet isn't that great for people - like a crisp, wet, bland turnip. But cows love them, and sliced thinly they make an OK alfresco snack in the paddock, I guess.

Feb 09, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Hamburger controversy!

That's it? Nothing at all other than hand selected ground beef and the bun? Salt?

Also, when I lived near NYC no-one called it mince - that's a brit/aussie thing - it was always ground beef... where you from, Jungmann?

Feb 09, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

Hamburger controversy!

Having just watched Hester Blumenthal creating his 'perfect' hamburger, arguments have broken out all over our house.
Here in South Australia, the classic 'burger with the lot' - from a burger bar or made at home - includes bun, patty, onion (caramelised and/or raw - each brings their own element and has it's own supporters) cheese, tomato, pickled beetroot and lettuce, all soused in tomato sauce (ketchup).
Popular additions include egg and pineapple. Mayo, pickles and bacon are also available, but less popular.
The essential salad element after the tomato and lettuce is beetroot - Hungry Jacks (the local franchise of Burger King) has caved to local tastes, and even Maccas (McDonalds) has periodic specials featuring beetroot.

So what constitutes the 'perfect' burger in your part of the world?

Feb 08, 2011
AnotherMother in General Topics

salvaging duck fat

Just dip a little white bread (or other neutral starch) in the fat and taste it. If it tastes fine, well then it is fine - for any use. If not, well, feed it to the cat and chalk it up to experience.

It is the protein etc that burns in the first instance, not the fat, so you may be able to save the fat.

If it is salvageable - and it might be, even if the cracklings are a bit scorched - be very careful to exclude every trace of burnt matter from the fat you keep. Even a little will impart a burned taste to whatever else you cook.

Aug 31, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

What to do with cooked chicken?

This approach sounds ideal - a boost of umami, which is really needed - and taste and textural contrasts to counterbalance anything the chicken may lack.

The only problem is that it is winter here - cold, miserable and wet, and I don't think anyone is in the mood for a salad!

So maybe I should take the principle elements of the salad, and try to use these to create a hot dish...a pilaf, perhaps? Or a riff on beans and rice?

Aug 02, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Best recipe for heritage chicken

The feed animals consume really does affect their flavour, but not quite so directly - fruit fed fowl do taste different, but they don't taste of the fruit.

So they won't be raspberry flavoured, but they will be the better for it.

An aside - When I was a kid the house cow once gorged herself on turnips and so we had turnip flavoured milk for a few days...

Aug 02, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Use arborio rice and really good home made chicken stock for risotto? I don't.

Hank you are not alone... I made risotto from short grain rice (about 25% of the price of arborio) and chicken stock cubes when I was a student, and liked the result better than most of what I later ate in restaurants.

Sure, the proper way is, well, the proper way, and the results are excellent. I often make stock for other uses. But for family meals? - Hank, you and I can do it our way! Cheaper and with easy, punchy flavour!

I think you are correct when you say that you can dispense with the gelatin when the rice imparts so much starch.

And the cherry on top is that I don't use the ladle and stir technique, either - the liquids go into the rice in two batches. I do stir frequently, however, and monitor the rice for the correct degree of 'done-ness'.

The results are very good, definitely in keeping with the style of classical risotto despite their dubious origins.

Aug 02, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

What to do with cooked chicken?

I have a lot of nice chicken meat picked off the bone, left from a marathon stock-making session. (It's winter here in Australia and chicken soup is in big demand!)
There is lot of meat, and it won't be needed for the soup.

What can I do to pep it up for a weekday family dinner?

The meat is tender and appetizing, but doesn't have as much flavour as it could - all the deliciousness has gone into the stock. But it is still much too good to waste.

Any and all ideas gladly received!

Aug 02, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Tomato sauce depth of flavor question

You need to add sugar! You can't make a good tomato sauce without a little sugar, along with the salt. It expands the flavour noticeably.

Jul 19, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Grey truffle salt

Pilinut, I had a very similar experience to you...
I spent a fortune on an imported truffle (even more expensive here, as we are on the other side of the world!) only to discover that the truffle itself was pfft! Nothing!

I did some research and discovered that many shippers mix batches of truffles, including something known as a 'chinese truffle' which looks a lot like a black winter truffle but which has almost no scent, in with a few real truffles. So, even though I asked to smell the truffles before buying them, I was hoodwinked.

I adore truffles, and have found some fairly satisfactory truffle oils, and I will stick to those for the foreseeable future. I know it is mostly 'truffle aroma' rather than truffle, but at least I get something for my trouble!!

Jul 10, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Homemade Pink Lemonade

We make ours with sliced strawberries, they mingle with the ice cubes and the colour leaches into the lemonade.

Jul 08, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Horse Meat

Horse meat is good.
I ate it (in Paris), to challenge my preconceptions a little.
It is similar to beef but sweeter, leaner and tenderer. It responds similarly to beef, too, but I would not overcook it. It makes a good steak, but I am not sure it would braise particularly well, as it has a fairly pronounced grain.

I am curious to know how horse meat would convey particular health benefits, however.

Surely there are lots of lean red meats (venison, buffalo etc) that are easier to obtain and not so culturally... sensitive...?

Jul 08, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Uses for hazelnut oil

I use it when I need a 'tasty in a good way' oil when making pastry or baked goods generally, not so much as an ingredient but as a tool, to 'butter' pans and moulds, or to add a little shine. As you would for olive oil for savoury foods.

Jun 22, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Rye Bread recipe?

Thanks Bushwickgirl, this looks like one I will try this weekend. The potatoes are a definite plus, I know and like potato bread so this is a natural next step. Many thanks.

Jun 21, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Leftover Filet into burritos

Don't simmer it, stir-fry it. Lots more flavour that way, and you can cook it just to your liking. Slice into fine strips, and quickly fry on a high heat with whatever burrito-like condiments you might have (peppers, hot sauce, whatever). Save the cilantro for garnish at the end, then serve as for burritos.

Jun 21, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Rye Bread recipe?

That recipe looks good and it has many of the elements I am looking for, but it is still more in the style of a light rye.

I suspect the one I am after has a minimum of wheaten flour it in it, just enough to bind the rye (which is low in gluten).

Does anyone have access to the recipes their northern European grandma used to use??

Jun 19, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking

Rye Bread recipe?

Does anyone know of a traditional-style rye bread recipe?

One that has a high ratio of rye bread flour to wheaten flour, and results in a heavy, dark, smooth-textured loaf?

I'd prefer one without kibble, I am not after the pumpernickle style - nor am I after the type of recipe with cocoa powder in it!

My family has a taste for traditional rye bread, but we sadly lost the recipe some time ago, and most bought loaves are pale imitations of the real thing...

Jun 19, 2010
AnotherMother in Home Cooking