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What's the difference in French Oven and Dutch oven?

Hi, I have never heard anyone say "Dutch oven" here in the uk. It looks like they exist in the camping world though. I should go camping more!

We call the "French/dutch ovens" ... casseroles.

Jul 23, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

Does anyone cook on a LaCanche Cluny? Do you have the duel fuel or one fuel?

Hi, all I know is it looks great and I want one!

There is a long running series of threads in the gardenweb appliances forum for all things lacanche... Loads of Cluny chat in there. It goes back years and someone has thoughtfully archived the older threads in a blog somewhere.

I am thinking of getting a lacanche macon. With a gas oven and an electric one. Best of both worlds.

Apr 17, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

Coolest Pot on the Planet

That's good value for money... If you ever use it!

How about this weird one :

http://www.auravita.com/product/De-Bu...

Feb 26, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

Coolest Pot on the Planet

I have a tart tatin which is pretty useful - not just for making tart tatin.. Its good on the stove when there's not much room, or in the oven with a few roasted vegetables. In a strange way, this useful nature has tainted its appeal for me. Plus, it was too easy to smuggle in to the house, no adrenaline whatsoever.

Now, a copper bain Marie, or turbotiere have limited use, look great, and would be hell to smuggle in to the kitchen and pretend that they had always been there. Perfect! I want them.

That pomme vapour looks very odd.. I'm putting it low down my list.

Feb 26, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

Coolest Pot on the Planet

Mmmm... I really want one of those, and also a mauviel zabaglione pan too! I don't know why I like speciality pots and pans, but i do. A lot.

You got a bargain!

Feb 25, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

All clad fry pan question

Yes. That's what I thought. No flipping needed, and no saute pan needed either.

Although my saute pan is the most used pan in the kitchen. Don't know how I managed without it for all those years. I have frying pans with ss lining that just gather dust.

Feb 21, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

Range hood - why it's needed ?

+1
I started using mine all the time a few months ago, even just on low with normal low to medium heat cooking. I found there was much less "sticky dust" to clean off the cabinets and surfaces... Even over the other side of the kitchen.

Feb 21, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

All clad fry pan question

Yeah, i too sometimes flip if the mood is right and the spatula is out of reach. But always in a frying pan and never in a saute pan as it doesn't work well for me.

This is what got me thinking about either the name of the saute pan being "wrong", or the method of sauteeing being ill defined or mutated in modern English kitchen language.

As Larry sanders would say... "No flipping!"

Feb 21, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

All clad fry pan question

Dont worry, youre not boring me. So a sautuese is more like a Windsor or splayed saute, rather than a saucier?

So, none of our references insist we must flip or toss the pan in order to sauter? That's weird, considering that's what most people think you have to do.

Feb 20, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

All clad fry pan question

Hi,

From the link below, It seems the saute pan in French is called a sautoir, the saucier is known as a sautuese. They don't have a pan known as a saute pan. Does this imply the saute method is separate from the noun describing the pan? Also, the saute method of cooking, seems to have originally not demanded flipping of food on the air.

Maybe there is confusion because the method of saute cooking has changed in definition, and also for many doesn't work well in the pan that bears its name.

https://www.stellaculinary.com/catego...

Feb 20, 2013
Fumet in Cookware

$1500-2000 to spend on a set of copper pots what would you buy?

Hi,

I have left one of my pans for about 15 mins on high and it was fine. Too hot to touch, all the way through the handle, but fine. The cooker is not Mega powerful, but it was on high. I guess it may eventually delaminate, but I know it is more durable than you suggest. I have never had trouble with my tin either.... maybe I am lucky.

If I ever need to replace a pan, I can use the money I saved from not retinning. For the tin pans, I can just get them retinned. I don't think the deciding factor is cost in the long run. As you said already .. its more about tradition vs durability, clean freak or not, etc. The op will likely be happy with any high end copper option.

As for specific pans, first get the ones where copper can shine. Saute, saucier, windsor, saucepan - in as many sizes as you need. Don't bother with stock frying pans or large oven bound pots - other materials are better in my opinion, and will also look good hanging.

Oct 16, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

$1500-2000 to spend on a set of copper pots what would you buy?

I have mauviel, mostly stainless steel and a couple of tin. You will be polishing a lot if you like things shiny all the time. Falk are apparently more forgiving in this respect.

If you buy tin, you will eventually have to re-tin them.... due to to wear or mistakes leaving it on the cooker. Stainless steel may pit, but I have never seen it with my pans. If you search for "Delamination of copper and ss" on the internet, you will only find people saying it can happen, but no actual cases of it happening, which makes it more theory than anything.

Tin is less sticky and you can get thicker pans which is a bonus, although I can't tell the difference with my cooking and I do delicate French sauces with either.

I think you will be happy with any of the top grade copper out there. Just make sure you don't buy less than 2.5mm thick, or anything with a brass handle.

Oct 16, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

Grilled Halibut on Lodge Cast Iron Reversible Griddle - Sticking Issues!

Also, don't forget to prep the fish beforehand. Get it to room temperature and pat it dry with kitchen towel. It will stick less.

Aug 19, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

My new Mauviel M'Heritage cookware - need help

Hi,

There is no lacquer on the copper surface. The handles have some kind of lacquer on them, presumably to stop them rusting. It is supposed to be there, don't try and remove it. It is hard wearing and tolerates high oven heat without a problem.

Don't know about your caramalised handle.. weird. Pic? I will say that there is colour and shade variation on these handles, they're all a little different.

Personally, I think bkf is a little harsh. I use mauviels copperbrill. Bit more expensive, but I don't use it often.

Aug 17, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

Bought a De Buyer Carbone Plus Fry Pan. Now what?

hi, Handle never gets too hot to handle on stove top. Bit warm but that's it. I recommend wiping with warm lard for storage, rather than oil. No rancidity problems and seems to resist rust better.

Apr 04, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

Bought a De Buyer Carbone Plus Fry Pan. Now what?

Hi, I have a few carbonne plus. The handle has some sort of coating. Don't know what it is, but it doesn't rust, doesn't need seasoning and I have had it in the oven many times without the slightest issue.

Apr 03, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

What is the best material for a dutch oven to be made of?

Hi, yeah I read that thread! Buyers remorse taken to the next level! I tend to read a lot of reviews and do loads of research,... but after purchase, the only relevant review is my own!
Happy cooking, fumet.

Jan 09, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

What is the best material for a dutch oven to be made of?

I see, that makes sense about the fond floating into the fat. I went for the satin black le creuset which so far has not displayed that problem because the enamel is not glossy. I think the staubs also have this satin enamel,.. but I am not sure.

Jan 08, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

What is the best material for a dutch oven to be made of?

Hi,

I was referring to serving whole cooked dishes at the table, not just sauces. When the OP talks about dutch ovens, the kind of food that would go from hob to oven to table comes to my mind. And for that usage pattern I have had a better overall experience with eci than copper. For sauces I would use copper and serve in a pre heated sauce boat, like you said.

Oh, and why does eci alone have this one dish problem with sauces?

Jan 07, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

What is the best material for a dutch oven to be made of?

I was using mauviel saute pans for hob to oven dishes. Control on the hob is obviously great, but the problem for me is how quickly they cool down when you serve at the table. Some sauces end up with skin on, or just too cold in general.

I bought a couple of eci le creuset shallow ovens and find them much better for this kind of cooking and eating.

Jan 06, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

Can you recommend a cast-iron pot (at least 6 inches deep)?

Hi, just so you know, all satin black le creuset have staub-style black enamel too. Best, fumet.

Jan 02, 2012
Fumet in Cookware

tramontina enameled cast iron?

Hi,

I have been using copper saute pans as casseroles and they do work, but I find they cool down too quickly when they go to the table. Some food just goes cold, some gets a skin on the sauce... not great.

For this reason I just bought 2 shallow casseroles and use them for any dish that is oven bound. They don't work as well for the cooktop stage but its hardly an issue and outweighed by their performance on the table.

Dec 20, 2011
Fumet in Cookware

Le Creuset - Black Satin

I have been considering the black satin dutch ovens too. I currently dont have any Le Creuset (what!?! ... I know!) and might get a few dutch ovens, roasting trays, etc. The 2 colours with the most choice are Flame (which I don't particularly like) and Black Satin.

How does the black satin finish compare to the shiny enamel finish? I think I prefer the look of the normal shiny light enamel, but after a few years it starts to look a bit stained. :-(

Does anyone have any direct experience with both of the finishes, who could tell us how they compare, for browning, sticking, cleaning, long-term appearance, durability, etc ?

Dec 02, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

My search for a Non-Stick alternative, my results, and THANKS!

you're welcome. I did think it strange, as your posts are usually "on the money".

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

Our de buyer Carbon Steel Cookware Experience

I think the Mineral pans are slightly more expensive, but still, those prices seem really high. They are cheaper this side of the pond :-

http://www.kingsandqueens.org.uk/cata...

They even sell them now with stainless steel handles and cast iron handles - but I think I like the el cheapo restaurant-style stamped handles. For me, the attraction of these pans is they perform so well, look great, last forever and are cheap! It's rare to see all of those things together.

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

My search for a Non-Stick alternative, my results, and THANKS!

good idea! I wear a special amulet made of cats teeth when I season my pans. works for me. ymmv.

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

My search for a Non-Stick alternative, my results, and THANKS!

Confusion cleared up! :-)

I agree that a user can start using a pan even if it is not perfect looking. Cooking certain foods is a great way to get it seasoned. Sauteed potatoes work very well as only a small amount of fat is left in the pan and the flipping and tossing move the oil around and mimic the wiping with kitchen paper.

I guess my point is that a pan should never at any stage of its "seasoning story" look like that ouichef picture and I blame seasoning method. Seems like we agree on that.

Happy Seasoning!

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

My search for a Non-Stick alternative, my results, and THANKS!

Beef dripping works as well. I prefer animal fats. US folks say Crisco is good,but I don't really know what that is or how well it works.

BTW, when I said "Have to disagree with you there", I was disagreeing with Chem's post which listed the two web links as good seasoning of carbon steel. I just replied to the wrong thing, I think.

http://ouichefcook.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/pancomp-1024x958.jpg
http://letsstartsimple.com/wp-content...

The first looks to have been done in the oven, the second looks like it has caked on food burnt into it over many years.

Sorry Chem,.. disagree with you! :-) I am sure the pans cook just fine like that, but it's not what people should be shooting for - and I believe its primarily the method which is at fault.

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

My search for a Non-Stick alternative, my results, and THANKS!

Hi,

Have to disagree with you there. IMO, that person did not season the pan correctly. The ouichef one looks like she has done it in the oven - which is a bad idea for carbon steel. That is what I did when I first seasoned one. I scrubbed it off with a brillo pad - took hours!

The pans are so smooth that if the smallest amount of oil can gather into little puddles or drip lines when it is heated and then those formations are burnt into the pan. This isnt a problem for modern non-machined cast iron as the hot oil fills the rough surface and ultimately smooths it out over repeat seasonings (my cast iron took years to go glass smooth).

Carbon steel is smooth when you buy it and should remain smooth as you season it. It will go light brown,brown,dark brown and then slowly to black. If you have any gummy bits you have used too much oil - don't just try and burn it in.

The method I use is :-

1) Heat up the pan (on medium heat, like you cooking bacon, not searing a steak)
2) Wipe lard using folded up kitchen roll into the pan and wipe away as much as you can
3) You should see it gently smoking,.. not billowing plumes.
4) You will see that even though you wiped the fat away, it will gather into tiny droplets. Wipe those away.
5) Keep wiping away and watching it gently smoke until the fat is looking like its burnt off and the smoking has almost stopped.
6) Heat off, let the pan cool a bit,wipe some lard in to lubricate and protect the pan.
7) Let it completely cool off.
8) Repeat every now and then. I sometimes do this after cooking with it. I will heat it up,bit of lard and salt,clean pan, chuck salt out, follow from step 3.

Be really careful with this method. Use many sheets of kitchen paper folded over and dont heat to a billowing smoke level! Open a window too.

Dont use fats with high smoke points. It just means you need more heat, the surface can go gummy on storage and I believe the seasoning surface is not as good,.. but that might be nonsense.

I have attached a picture (apologies for the quality). It is a carbonne plus pan so it started a silver colour.

Hope I helped someone. Don't mean to diss your methods! :-)

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware

Our de buyer Carbon Steel Cookware Experience

Same for me. I use the cast iron a lot less since I got some carbon steel. Only really use it for when its huge heat retention is a plus (eg, loads of mushrooms). Advantages for me are :-

1) Lighter than cast iron, Can flip food around! Love doing that!
2) Smoother surface = faster seasoning,.. better non-stick!
3) Heats up quicker than cast iron

I actually find a thick bit of steak easier in carbon steel. Sear first side. Flip to different part of the pan and sear other side. Flip back and chuck it in the oven. I find I get a more even steak like that. With cast iron there is too much pan heat going on during the oven phase. BTW, I have the Carbonne Plus line - so that might make a difference.

I'm off to make an omelette in one right now. Ham and cheese I think.

Oct 21, 2010
Fumet in Cookware