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Real Italian Food Vs. American Italian Food

What distinguishes these two, really? With Chinese food, it's a bit obvious, with nearly everything sweet, and Indian food tends to lack the spice it typically does, but what about Italian? What is considered American Italian and what's actually Italian?

Authenticy of Food?

Eh, I don't see where the American argument that British food is bland comes from, given the only thing we tend to put on our food is sweet sugary stuff, which is worse. As for Eastern European food, I wish there were more restaurants that catered to the taste. Their food is awesome.

May 17, 2010
Undeadsteak in General Topics

Authenticy of Food?

Honestly, I don't mind chains as long as they taste good; that's what I'm there for, after all. Good tasting food. I've been to the small hole in the wall Chinese restaurants and the such; sometimes they shine, sometimes they are terrible. However, now and then, I end up drifting towards PF Chang's simply because I know it's reliable in quality, though not the best. One of the best Chinese I've tasted was some random shop in Sacramento in a small town that was six bucks for a bowl of rice and meat. I somehow doubt the possibility of finding something like that, at least for the price, in a suburban area filled with Outbacks and Cheesecake Factories, however.

May 17, 2010
Undeadsteak in General Topics

Authenticy of Food?

So basically; screw this topic, it either tastes good or not. That sounds like a fine answer to leave with for me. You can't really trust people who say whether it's "authentic" or not, unless they've actually tasted food from that homeland. Americanized is just a pointless term that means it's been changed around, so basically non-"authentic." And even then, I can't really criticize Indian restaurants. Are they really non-authentic for cutting down on the spice? That's just a personal preference... Now, if they coated honey on their chicken tikka, I'd understand.

May 15, 2010
Undeadsteak in General Topics

Authenticy of Food?

I hear the term "authentic" and "Americanized" being thrown around so much, but I really have to ponder on what they mean. I believe authentic means that it tastes like food that has the same distinct flavors as one would discover in the nation the restaurant is representing; however, this means people should not be throwing around the term so lightly, as most have probably never visited the place. How can they know whether it is "Authentic" or not? Furthermore, what is Americanized food? I see that being used a lot for Indian food, and as I am very much familiar with homemade Indian food and restaurants in India, I see no difference, except the food here is maybe toned down in spice and the Butter Chicken is a bit more sweeter. Much of the Indian-Chinese cuisine is missing, and the food is usually crappy, but that fault lies with the cook. If food is not authentic, does that mean it is Americanized? If it is Americanized, is it unauthentic? I'm going to take a wild shot and guess Americanized means dimmed down to reflect American taste, but once again, unless they've dumped a bunch of sugar into it, how can someone who has not eaten real Indian food determine whether it is "Americanized" or not? Overall, it just seems like a term thrown around to slander or praise restaurants.

May 14, 2010
Undeadsteak in General Topics