j

jane's Profile

Title Last Reply

2014 SF Bay Area Michelin Stars

Don't bother going back to AQ, MissEnPlace - I've tried three times and every visit was exactly as you describe. Almost everybody on staff acted like we should be thrilled to be there -- huffy, overly formal, just as you put it -- but it was an emperor's-new-clothesy show, with the server telling us a dish was exquisite when it tasted just okay. Almost funny, at times, like when a waiter haughtily told us how you could tell a really good wine because it was made of only one kind of grape. The last visit, we waited 15 minutes to order drinks and then, after another 10 (and these were not cocktails, just beer and wine), when we asked about where they were, we got a "humph" from the waiter, who stomped off and didn't come back for another long while. Dessert was good, though.

Nov 04, 2013
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

5 food industry folks in San Fran from Boston for 3 days - how we doing so far?

Robert's list is really good, though I'm not a Yuet Lee fan.

With all due respect to the Boxing Room devotees, I don't think there's anything there you can't get better in some other town.

I'd add the Alembic - open Mondays, open till 1 for food, 2 for the bar.

Jan 22, 2013
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

Best place to buy Northern Italian Wines

One more shop you should know about: Dig, in Dogpatch. Small shop but great selection of French and Italian wines. Some you know, a lot you don't.

Jan 14, 2013
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

Sour Cream Coffee Cake

Got to chime in just because I ADORE this cake. Yes, lots of holes -- but not dry at all. Just not too dense. This one disappeared in minutes.

Sep 06, 2012
jane in Recipes

Can you slow cook in two phases?

Thanks, todao. I don't think I left it out for any significant period of time. But I do hear your point about meeting or exceeding USDA recs.

Aug 31, 2012
jane in Home Cooking

Can you slow cook in two phases?

I put a pork butt in the oven at 200 degrees intending to give it six or more hours. But I was called away after three. So I put it in the fridge. Can I just continue cooking it as if nothing happened? Should I bring it to room temperature first? And what about internal temp? I was planning on going for around 180 degrees, but now I have no idea. Thanks - advice much appreciated.

Aug 31, 2012
jane in Home Cooking

Hot Gastropubs in San Fran

Just went to Abbott's Cellar last night, and the beer list was amazing. Pages and pages by the glass and by the bottle. BUT...the food was mediocre or worse. Bad enough that we were actually angry. Much prefer St. Vincent, with a smaller but gorgeous list and incredible food.

One more: Schmidt's, the German restaurant in the Mission (Folsom at 20th).

Aug 27, 2012
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

St. Vincent and the New Kind of Restaurant Comfort

Ha! Hey, kberger, I've got the glasses, and I'd probably have the beard if I could. Yes, try State Bird. More casual than St. V, and as you've probably heard, mostly dim sum style. But don't neglect the pancakes on the menu!

Aug 05, 2012
jane in Features

San Francisco Dish of the Month July 2012: Voting Thread

ASIAN FRIED CHICKEN
and then banh khot later...

Jul 02, 2012
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

Great beer bar in SF?

it's not a bar - more a gastropub - but the beer list at St. Vincent on Valencia is really good. Small, but excellent. (And the food is so thoughtful, interesting, delicious.) They've got at least three sours, including a sour ale on tap from Dying Vines in Oakland and a Jolly Pumpkin sour Saison in the bottle. A moderately easy BART ride from Union Square.

Jun 26, 2012
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

Best wine you've had under $15

It's hot here now, so I'm thinking about roses and sauvignon blancs: love Domaine des Corbillieres rose from the Loire. A real crowd pleaser. Also quite a few good NZ sauvignon blancs under $15, of course; sometimes you can get Oyster Bay for less than $10.

Jun 11, 2012
jane in Wine

Change in the site header

It's not an insult! At least it's not meant to be. I'm sorry it feels that way. It's actually a dilemma we've been wrestling with since CHOW & Chowhound were both acquired and meant to cohabitate. We've tried the branding both ways - with separate CHOW & Chowhound headers and with a common header -- and I suspect this won't be the last adjustment.

Jan 10, 2012
jane in Site Talk

Change in the site header

Yes -- What's New, Video, Recipes, Chowhound Discussions are the main navigation buttons. The Chowhound Discussions button will be redundant on the Chowhound homepage, but better redundant than difficult to find.

Jan 10, 2012
jane in Site Talk

Change in the site header

Melanie, I wanted to doublecheck before I responded: Digest will be a button on the "What's New" dropdown.

Jan 09, 2012
jane in Site Talk

Change in the site header

It's definitely not going away.

Jan 09, 2012
jane in Site Talk

Change in the site header

Thanks, rworange. Yes, more soon. And, as you can see, our engineering team is working hard on improved search.

Jan 09, 2012
jane in Site Talk

Change in the site header

I want to alert you about changes coming to our top navigation bar. We haven't liked it, and neither have you. One of the most common complaints we've heard about the site is that navigation is confusing, and that one of the most confusing parts is that top bar. (For those who have somehow managed to ignore this problem, it's this: when you click from CHOW to Chowhound or back, the buttons in the top navigation bar change. On CHOW they're "Recipes," "Top Stories" and "Video," and on Chowhound they're "Discussion," "Digest," "Restaurants," "Recipes," "Video.") Many people have told us this is disorienting and, worse, that it makes it difficult for them to get where they want to go. In retrospect this may seem obvious, but when we implemented it, it really did seem like a good idea: the CHOW experience was different from the Chowhound experience, and we felt they each deserved their own nav. We were wrong.

So we're changing that top bar and making navigation consistent across CHOW and Chowhound. Starting early next week, we will have a new header, and those navigation buttons will be the same no matter what page you're on. If you're on CHOW or if you're on Chowhound, you'll see top nav buttons that say "Stories," "Video," "Recipes," and "Chowhound Discussions." In addition, we're bringing back drop-down menus, so that you can get where you want to go with one click.

One change that's less simple is this: we will be eliminating the top nav button for "Restaurants." It's the first step toward removing the restaurant pages altogether. This may be alarming to some who have used those pages to post restaurant reviews, tips, and reference data. But please don't worry: the pages themselves will still be around for a while, and any reviews that you posted will be available to you for quite some time. We'll have more information on that soon.

Why the change? We originally offered restaurant information in order to make the Chowhound boards more useful. We thought we'd forestall the slightly annoying need to continually reply to a post with the question, "Where is this place you're talking about?" However, those good intentions have not been well served. We have heard that our restaurant listings have not been particularly helpful to most people most of the time, and they've slowed down the performance of the site. So we're beginning the process to eliminate those pages. More on that as the project commences. You will be well forewarned before any of this takes place.

Those changes are in the future. Right now, we're just changing the nav, and will be launching the new header next week. We hope that it's intuitive and seamless enough that you won't even notice.

Jan 09, 2012
jane in Site Talk

Saison, Benu, The Dining Room at the Ritz, Gary Danko, La Folie, Chez Panisse or Fleur de lys?

Absolutely agree with the choice of Benu. Ate there last night -- the 18-course tasting menu -- and it was spectacular. Everything was prepared & presented perfectly - A few highlights: oyster, pork belly and kimchi was smoky salty with a hint of heat; chicken in a delicate jasmine broth with little balls of dates that added a touch of sweet to the fragrance; foie gras xiao long bao were exquisite little soup dumplings-- the whole effect was like a puff of chewiness, a burst of liquid, a bare hint of foie. I won't go on -- too many dishes, obviously -- but it was a treasure of little tastes and textures, luscious without relying on fat and salt. I wasn't sure I could withstand all the courses -- tasting menus often go on long past my appetite and patience -- but every single one was welcome, satisfying and delightful.

-----
Benu
22 Hawthorne St, San Francisco, CA 94103

Aug 20, 2011
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

Tip for Wolf Stove owners - More BTU's

Really? This is huge! I've been so disappointed with what passes for "high" on my Wolf. Chefs come over and ridicule it. And I'd just given trying to really sear something. Can't wait to try.

May 27, 2011
jane in Cookware

Atelier Crenn - My New Favorite Place

Couldn't agree more, goingoutagain. Just visited Atelier Crenn for the first time, had the chef's tasting menu, and I loved every beautiful, tenderly prepared, crazy-ass dish. If Rene Redzepi merged with Wylie Dufresne and then went to art school and had an affair with Gabrielle Hamilton, you might get a cook like Dominique Crenn. Starter: frozen white chocolate balls with cider inside, garnished with a reduction of cassis (a tribute to a non-alcoholic kir.) Smoked oysters: dark with smoke but briny and tender, served with two large and stately sous vide shrimp. Sous vide char: delicate, flaky texture that melts in your mouth, surrounded by uni foam. Foie gras: a crazy miniature log with pickled morels growing out of its knotholes (and a little bit of melting vanilla snow around it...springtime!). Pigeon: perfectly prepared, a hint of game and a whiff of the campfire. Pork belly: crisp and tender, served with poached iceberg lettuce to make a BLT-like salt-and-crispy combo. Oh, and a dessert of douglas fir popsicles served in a foggy miniature forest of fir needles and liquid nitrogen. And there's more!

What I loved was that this was a rare menu that was not just tasting, but eating. The ingredients were chosen with a theme in mind (springtime), the presentation was gorgeous, the preparation was arduous, and there were all kinds of liquid nitrogeny tricks, but the dishes that resulted didn't feel like stunts - they felt like real nourishment. And it didn't seem like I was being subjected to the ego of an over-achieving chef, but that the chef made something wonderful and I got to enjoy it.

Okay, enough. This is starting to sound unbelievable. Anything wrong? Well, I wish it was in another neighborhood.

It's an expensive menu ($115 per person), but there are real treasures being bestowed on you, so it seems appropriate.

This was a great meal.

-----
Atelier Crenn
3127 Fillmore St, San Francisco, CA 94123

May 06, 2011
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

What on earth has happend to www.chow.com? Design and layout

Happy to discuss, HillJ - wondering why video? So you can see the evolution of the design?

Oct 22, 2010
jane in Site Talk

What on earth has happend to www.chow.com? Design and layout

To fill in the blanks: When the magazine CHOW existed, its online counterpart's URL was chowmag.com; chow.com was at the time a domain registered by somebody with the name Chow so his family members could have a Chow email address. CNET had enough money and clout (or whatever it took) to get the Chow domain.

I also want to say thanks for this thread. I've got some questions, but mostly it's very helpful to hear these observations.

Oct 22, 2010
jane in Site Talk

Who Should Be Allowed to Review Restaurants?

Thanks, everybody, for the comments. You've reminded me that this is foremost a medium of open conversation, and comments in aggregate can be worth more than any one person's experience. As tatamagouche says, the key is disclosure when appropriate. And non-disclosure when appropriate. And probably shutting up when appropriate, too. Now I just have to figure out what's appropriate.

Oct 05, 2010
jane in Features

Plow in Potrero?

Today was the first Plow served weekday breakfast, and they didn't get anything wrong at our table. There were only two of us so I can only review two dishes: frittata and lemon ricotta pancakes. Frittata had pine nuts and currants & served warm, not hot. Lemon ricotta pancakes were perhaps a tiny bit too lemony, but you could taste the ricotta and the texture was nicely spongy with some crisp edges. The standout item was the side of potatoes -- Yukon Golds baked and then dunked into the fryer for a moment, so they've got full-on baked potato flavor and texture with a crispy fried melt-in-your-mouth exterior so light it could have been tempura. Well-chosen ingredients, including Nueske's bacon; good, rich coffee; real maple syrup. Four stars instead of five simply because the pancakes could have been a little fluffier. Nitpicking, really. This was a fine breakfast. Great service, too - friendly and attentive - and a darn cute modern-farmhouse-style space (reclaimed wood, wainscotting, contemporary with a traditional feel). Counter service, too, on metal barstools, just like an upscale greasy spoon breakfast joint should have.

-----
Plow
1299 18th St, San Francisco, CA 94107

Sep 28, 2010
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

Rough and Ready Zinfandel

Thanks, Melanie, you're right: I was playing fast and loose with the facts for a joke that got cut anyway. I believe it came over in the 1800s and was thought to be Austro-Hungarian, Italian (with speculation that it's really Primitivo) and now Croatian. As I understand it, It gets its "American" identity because it's been grown here for so long, and because it's believed not to grow very well anywhere but California. That's the last I heard regarding its pedigree -- any more recent info?

Jan 09, 2009
jane in Features

Wine cooler recommendations?

I'm about to buy a new wine cooler for the kitchen. This cooler will hold wine that I'm about to serve, plus the good stuff - wine that I want to make sure gets the best and most consistent environment. The rest will be stored elsewhere. I figure the cooler should hold around 30-40 bottles. I'm thinking dual zone. First, does this sound like a good plan? And second, any recommendations? For now, let's pretend price is no object. Thanks.

Nov 13, 2008
jane in Wine

Creative Director of Chow Thinks Your Comments are "Worthless"

It certainly doesn't sound like Jeremy. I texted him about it -- he's on his way back to SF from NY -- and asked him about it. He's stunned by this recap. But I'll let him respond. He's getting on the plane, so it will probably be around eight hours.

For what it's worth, we've had many, many discussions about how to encourage MORE feedback and comments.... "Worthless" is about as unlikely an opinion from him as I can imagine.

Oct 08, 2008
jane in Site Talk

Here comes the new look!

In a matter of minutes, we'll launch the new visual design of CHOW and Chowhound. You'll experience an interruption in the function of the site, but we'll be back online soon.....

Sep 25, 2008
jane in Site Talk

Corn muffins in San Francisco

I've been struck by this as well - used to love my coffee & toasted corn muffin every morning. There's a shop on 2nd Street, the one with the terrier on the awning (address maybe 121 2nd - next to Tara), that sells them. Pretty good banh mi, too.

Sep 10, 2008
jane in San Francisco Bay Area

A Real Summer Red

I love Imagery's Lagrein, a California version made with grapes from Paso Robles. Just as you describe it, Jordan -- light-feeling, despite the color; peppery, punchy, lip-smacking good.

Jul 10, 2008
jane in Features