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montyque's Profile

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Wash vegetables before roasting?

Yeah, I asked that same question above... I wasn't sure whether it was an old wives' tale that veggies shouldn't be washed until shortly before preparing. Maybe that's just the case with herbs, and not veggies? I wonder what the case would be for lettuces.

Feb 25, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

Wash vegetables before roasting?

It is a great variety of replies, and I'm very grateful to all of you -- and also psyched that I was able to start a lively conversation. Thanks to all.

Feb 25, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

Wash vegetables before roasting?

Good question... an even better one is: How many are heat-soluble? In starting this thread, I was most interested in what chemicals and bacteria could survive a 425-degree oven.

Feb 25, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

Wash vegetables before roasting?

I have one, but it's better at getting things less-than-drenched, as opposed to ready-to-roast dry.

Feb 24, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

Wash vegetables before roasting?

I always thought you were only supposed to wash veggies briefly before preparing them. Is that an old wives' tale?

Feb 24, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

Wash vegetables before roasting?

Alright, everybody, I guess the consensus is that I wash the damn broccoli. Now, if anyone has tips on drying the damn stuff...

Feb 24, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

Wash vegetables before roasting?

I have a nice-looking bunch of broccoli that I want to roast. It looks pretty clean, and I'll be subjecting it to 425-degree heat. Do I still need to wash it? Sure, washing isn't that hard -- it's the DRYING that's a pain. Roasting broccoli requires the vegetable to be really dry to get a proper caramelization, but you can't really pat it dry without somehow getting into every little sprout crevice, and I might not want to wait for hours for it to air dry.

So, do I reeeeeeeally need to wash this broccoli if I'm going to punish it with high temperatures and presumably kill all the bad stuff? What do you think? AND would your answer be different if said broccoli was organic?

Feb 24, 2011
montyque in Home Cooking

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

Thanks, everyone, for the advice! Anna and I don't regret a single excursion. It was truly a fantastic 42 hours in your fair city. Here's how the food rundown went:

Friday night: Au Pied de Cochon - Oreilles de crisse, foie gras cromesquis, PDC melting pot, foie gras tart (recall there are two of us, of course)

Saturday morning: Stroll around Marché Jean Talon, eating savory crepes and strawberries coated in maple syrup

Saturday lunch: Schwartz's - Smoked meat sandwiches, frankfurter, cole slaw, black cherry soda

Saturday dinner: Ma-am Bolduc - Poutine with bacon & onion, Pate Chinois, sugar pie

Sunday (this) morning: St. Viateur bagels - A whole bunch of sesame bagels, along with a tub of "Liberté cream cheese product with active cultures."

All delicious. Thanks again.

NY pizza terminology question

Sorry, this seems like a silly question, but it’s one I’ve never gotten settled to my satisfaction.

So, there are two major types of Pizza that are respected in NYC, the more revered being the variety served by Lucali and Lombardi’s. The other style is the kind exemplified by Joe’s in the West Village, but served more commonly by the 99 cent guys, as well as “Vinny’s New York pizza” of Omaha Nebraska, et al… really what most people in most parts of America think of when they think pizza that’s not Domino’s or Pizza Hut.

What’s the proper terminology? I would guess the words “coal” and/or “brick” would find their way into the former category… I’ve heard both styles referred to as “thin-crust” but obviously one’s is far thinner than the other’s, and both are thin when compared to Sicilian or Chicago styles.

I get “X” at Lombardi’s and “Y” at Joe’s. What are they?

Apr 05, 2010
montyque in Manhattan

Restaurant for business lunch near 53rd and Lex

Is it necessarily fine dining? I think Dos Caminos, which is right by there, would be a good place to take clients/partners... higher-end Mexican fare, with highly-regarded guacamole, but then again, I'm in advertising and enjoy drinking margaritas with clients. Also, if you're interested in a real New Yorky experience, Mexican is one of the few cuisines NYC is not known for, so there's that.

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Dos Caminos
475 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012

Apr 05, 2010
montyque in Manhattan

St. Viateur Bagels locations - Is the original the only one to visit?

OK, thanks for everyone's advice. Still not sure... I think it will depend on how much time we have Sunday morning. Meanwhile, I just found out there's a place in my home of Brooklyn called "Mile End" that serves smoked meat, poutine and... yes, Montreal bagels. I promised myself I'd wait til I'd tried Schwartz's, Resto Banquise and St. Viateur/Fairmount to taste the Brooklyn version.

St. Viateur Bagels locations - Is the original the only one to visit?

As I've mentioned in another thread, I'll be doing Montreal for just part of a weekend, and I have to make good use of time! The plan was to grab bagels on the way out of town, but the two biggies in what I guess is the Mile End are not so convenient. I notice, however, that St. Viateur has other locations. Will these others give me the same quality of bagel? Or should I just spend the extra time on a busy Sunday morning driving to the original?

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

Ha, sounds like our winner for the evening.

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

That's great to know - thanks! I was planning on using the Orange line like crazy to get back and forth from Downtown and the Plateau. This will help.

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

Appreciate it, Damfino. I think we're in a really good place now -- I have a tight itinerary that leaves just enough time for napping/lying in the park in food coma. We're staying downtown, close to the Station Berri hub, and I think we're okay with being in the Plateau most of the time, although we're blocking out a nice chunk of time to see the Old City. No shopping for us, really... we're in it for the food, drink, and atmosphere.

I'm pretty confident I can fit in Pied du Cochon, smoked meats, bagels and lots of good Quebecois fare. I can't wait to give a rundown of my trip and see what you all think.

One thing I don't have quite ironed out... I thought this could be my one area of spontaneity, but what the hell... any suggestions about a cool bar somewhere between Stations Mont-Royal and Sherbrooke? Our tastes run toward the dive-y, definitely away from dancing. Anything within spitting distance of Resto Banquise is great... that will be our last stop.

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

Thanks everyone for your help... Anna and I have everything planned out, and our experience will definitely be flavored by your responses. I'll let you know how it turns out next month.

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

Thanks, kpzoo... that was just what I was looking for. And thanks for those other links. I am a new chowhound, so I guess I didn't search through the archives properly. Sorry if this whole post constitutes bad ettiquette!

I will definitely map out all these great places and figure out a hotel within a distance where I can crawl back after finishing my meal(s).

One full day in Montreal! What does a tourist do?

So my girlfriend and I will be in Montreal from a Friday night to a Sunday morning in the middle of April. I'd love some suggestions. Because of our short visit, we will likely spend our time in the city, as trips to the countryside would take a bite out of our precious time.

The most important thing for me is to find stuff that defines the region, and stuff you really can't get anywhere else, or with great difficulty, in my home of New York City. Where's the best poutine? What's the deal with this "sugar shack" food, and can you get it in the city? What international cuisines are fantastic in Montreal (I've heard Indian and various Chinese)? Is it worth it to get a Montreal bagel (my hometown has some pretty good bagels), and if so, where do I want to get them? Help us immerse ourselves in Quebecois life for two nights and a day.

I should also mention that our tastes -- and budgets -- favor interesting holes-in-walls, and not fine dining, though I might shell out a bit for a really cool experience.

Oh, and any suggestions on what part of town to look for a hotel in... that'd be appreciated.

Merci!

Looking for a Williamsburg. Fort Greene and Cobble Hill dining expert.

How much do you wanna spend? If you're budget-conscious like me, check out Graziella's in Ft. Greene/Clinton Hill, home of arugula-and-shaved-parmesan pizzas, and in general a nice, inexpensive Italian joint. Seating on the rooftop in warmer months. Another Fort Greene budget place is Black Iris, Middle Eastern fare that's BYOB.

Mar 16, 2010
montyque in Outer Boroughs

Brooklyn Thai (that doesnt suck)

Speaking micro-locally, then, I live in Ft. Greene, and I've had good experiences with Myrtle Thai, though it might be more of the cheap Americanized stuff, they have some of the better AmeriThai food I've had in Brooklyn. My friends say to avoid Manee Thai.

Mar 15, 2010
montyque in Outer Boroughs

Where to post my multi-regional BBQ tour?

So I just joined Chowhound (longtime lurker) in order to post about my planned barbecue tour. Here's the thing... this is really an epic journey, and in my effort to taste every regional variation on the cuisine, I'll be traveling not only across the entire South, but in the Midwest (KC/St. Louis) and Texas' Hill Country. Sooooo... where do I post?

Mar 13, 2010
montyque in Site Talk