mattwright's Profile

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Magret duck breast in Seattle?

So I found some!!!!!!!!!!!! The magret breast is something rather special, and most places had never heard of it, let alone stocked it.

Uni Seafood and AJ only had either pekin breasts/legs/whole - and couldn't say if they were naturally and humanely raised.

The problem with Nicky, d'artagnan and so forth is the shipping prices for regular home customers. They obviously have to overnight it, and unless you are buying a lot, it just doesn't make any sense. I got quoted between $30 and $60 delivery costs - pretty much the price of what I was ordering.

However.. Don and Joes in Pikes market order anything from Nicky. You get it in a couple of days with NO SHIPPINGS COSTS!! This worked out great for me. I will certainly be using those guys again.

Jan 01, 2009
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Magret duck breast in Seattle?

Hiya everyone.. and happy new year (almost..) to start.

I am looking for some Magret duck breasts, to do some duck proscuitto with. I was hoping to buy locally, and was wondering if anyone knew of some stores in Seattle that carry this particular kind of duck breast?

Thanks!

Dec 29, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Where has all the game gone?

I know that PCC has both rabbit and duck, and it sometimes carries Phesant too. Whole Foods has some as well. Both carry game birds that have been raised humainly.

Nov 04, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Seattle to Bellevue for Newcomers

I hate to say it, Bellevue is a culinary wasteland compared to Seattle. I live in Seattle, and work in Bellevue. There is always a complete dillema about where to eat.

The Bellevue farmers market is really small, and not that great, and not year round. Best bet there is drive into the Seattle Ballard district on a Sunday.

Bellevue is VERY chain store oriented. Lots of Safeways etc. They do have a decent sized Whole Foods (or Whole Pay Check as we like to call it).

Cheap eats - that is tough. Bellevue development is pushing most cheaper places out, and getting higher end shops and more chain restaurants in. My favorite place for cheap eats in Bellevue is "Facing East".

The Uwajimaya's in Bellevue really isn't great, the veg section is terrible - only a few more unique items. The one in Seattle is far better.

Oct 13, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Mutton (SEA)?

I just recently bought some from Sea Breeze Farms, and it was exceptional. You might have to call them to get them to bring some to a local market for you though.

I recently blogged it actually on my blog. www.mattikaarts.com/blog

Oct 09, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Where to eat around Disneyland, and Redondo Beach??

Hiya all

My wife, 2 year old and I are travelling down to LA for a few days in Redondo Beach (family), then going to on Disneyland for a few days.

We are big into clean, locally grown food, and have tried looking up a few places around Disneyland but come up a complete blank.

If anyone has some good suggestions, that would be great! Oh - and suggestions for places around Redondo would be fabulous too.

Cheers!

Sep 09, 2008
mattwright in Los Angeles Area

Squab and Goose in Seattle?

WOW.. 14bucks for a pigeon. That is just crazy. One farm I called suggested I go down there and shoot a few. That is sounding like a good option, since I need at least 6 of them.

Sep 04, 2008
mattwright in Greater Seattle

Buying Dungeness crab in Seattle

Mutual Fish, down on Rainer Ave. Hand's down my favorite place to buy seafood in Seattle.

Sep 04, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Dining in Bellevue

Flo's is really great.. far better than Yama in my opinion.
Facing East is a great place too - I eat lunch their often. Their service can be hit or miss though - some days it is beyond perfect, other days dishes got forgotten, wrong orders get delivered.

Sep 04, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Via Tribunali QA (Sea)

I have never eaten here, and think I most likely never will - which is a shame - all thanks to one rather rude hostess on the phone.... I called asking if they were cool with kids, her reply was " we absolutely love kids, but we don't have high chairs, or booster seats. The space is really tight too, so it might not be best" - but really snotty.

Sep 04, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Squab and Goose in Seattle?

Hiya all

I am looking to source about 6 squab and a goose - preferably naturally, properly raised birds. Anyone have any ideas where to get these locally?

Cheers!

Matt

Sep 04, 2008
mattwright in Greater Seattle

Asian seafood and toddler friendly Seattle?

One of my favorite places to take our 20month old is Boom Noodle, up on Capital Hill. The place just loves kids, but also has the feel of a more adult restaurant. I have eaten there at least a dozen times with my son, and each time it has been great. The plus side is that it is a large space, that can get loud, so if the baby starts yelling, it isn't such a bad deal. The last time we were there the waitress even bought our son a dessert because she thought he was cute.

Aug 26, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Buying Dungeness crab in Seattle

Mutual Fish is my favorite fishmonger in Seattle. Pikes market unfortunately isn't good. It is for tourists that don't know what they are buying. Pretty obvious, but avoid anywhere that throws fish :D

Jul 29, 2008
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Defunct restaurant equipment auctions

Be careful. A lot of US states prohibit putting a true commerical stove into a residential application. Like a couple of people have mentioned, these things give of serious heat, more so than even a residential Bluestar. Wood cabinets near are a no no. I believe that behind the stove has to be fireproof material, even stainless over drywall won't do. Also you might require a true commerical venting system. Personally I would just go wtih a BlueStar range for the home.

Sep 10, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

cranberry beans recipe?

Simplicity if you ask me. Italian Two Easy has a great recipe that pairs cranberry (borlotti) beans with some parsley, chilli lemon juice. This goes as a great base for some scallops.

I like them mixed into salads also. Another Italian prep is to puree them with some lemon juice, garlic and olive oil. This goes great with grilled veg.

Sep 10, 2007
mattwright in Home Cooking

what knife is best for you

They have two models - the apex and the pro. Biggest difference really is that the pro is die-cast metal, so I guess would last much longer. I would get the Apex - it isn't like you are going to use it for hours every day. With a decent ceramic honing rod, I only use the EdgePro every 6months.

From what I remember, you are looking at about 150 for the Apex, for the Apex, with 3 sharpening stones. I recommend buying from epicureanedge.com

Sep 07, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

Is 14,000 BTU enough?

I think I might get a BlueStar. Cheaper than your vikings etc, and has 22k burners. Seems like a really high end range, and gets great reviews everywhere.

Aug 17, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

Affordable range? Gas? Electric? Please help!

Hmm, I think that is kinda bull about pro ranges to be honest. I am not a huge fan of Wolf or Viking, but if you get yourself a great BlueStar for 3.5k, it is going to be amazing. I have been appliance shopping for quite a while now, and from everything I have seen, SOME of the pro ranges have big advantages -

More BTU power on the burners
More than just one high power burner. That is somewhat crazy to me to have only one burner that can get stuff hot quickly
Build quality - things are BlueStar are somewhat overbuilt, and are going to last you a long time - especially the grates and burners.
More BTUs for the gas ovens, better temp regulations.

In all honesty, I wouldn't buy a Viking or Wolf over a cheaper brand, but a proper pro-style range (BlueStar, FiveStar) is a good purchase, and they depend on cooking performance rather than costly marketting. My advice would also be to steer clear of "gadget" options, especially electronics. One reason I am going with a simple all gas range, just less costly electronics to go wrong.

I have never understood the need for a multimedia fridge.. When I am cooking, I am focusing on cooking, not looking at a fridge front so I can watch my latest show. And yes, you could get a sodding nice TV for a couple of grand extra that the option costs you on your fridge.

Everything else from that consumer reports sounds fair to me. Spending thousands of dollars on a dishwasher is crazy to me, but hey.

Aug 16, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

what knife is best for you

Shun are just great if you ask me. Before Shun I had Wushof and Global, both are fine, but not a patch on Shun. I still use the Wusthof daily, I like how heavy the knife is, but it is the Shun that I use constantly for chopping. For me, you only really need 3 knives - a chefs, a pairing and a bread knife. You can honestly take care of most cooking tasks with those.

As for sharpening. I dislike most home sharpening tools on the market. Most don't get the knives anywhere close to "factory" sharp, which can actually be improved on a great deal, especially with cheaper knives (Shun come out the factory really sharp though). So, I would always suggest taking it to a good independant knife guy to sharpen, or if you want to do a decent job at home, look at getting the "Edge Pro" http://edgeproinc.com/ . I use one to sharpen my knives, and after some practice the knives are really razor sharp.

Aug 14, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

Farmers/Saturday Markets

I really enjoy the Ballard farmers market on Sundays. Open all year round, but is much larger in the summer.

This website lists all the farmers markets in puget sound:

http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/farms/farm...

Aug 13, 2007
mattwright in Pacific Northwest

Is 14,000 BTU enough?

I am not sold on induction. I know that they they give great heat fast, and are cool to touch. That is fantastic. I am more concerned about the electromagnetic radiation. No completely conclusive tests have been done yet as far as I can see.

Aug 13, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

Is 14,000 BTU enough?

We are finally getting round to renovating our kitchen, and I am looking at ranges.

Cooking is a huge passion for me, so much so I am writing a cookbook. I am so looking forward to getting rid of our dated electric hob oven, and getting a decent dual fuel range.

We are looking for a pro style range, something that gives good heat, and is solid. I should also note that we most likely won't be in this house for more than 4 years, so I am not looking for a complete beast of a range.

Right now, I am looking at Five Star. I have heard some great things about them (solid, great burner pattern, decent heat, good price). I am looking at their "open burner" range to help keep costs down. The range burners are rated up to 14,000 BTUs. If I went with the sealed burner, it would cost more cash, but the burners are then rated up to 21,000 BTUs. The price difference is about 300 bucks between the two.

I have never actually cooked on a pro-style range, and in fact very little on gas. I would love to hear people's thoughts on the following:

Is 14,000 BTUs enough?
How do people rate five star (bear in mind what I mentioned about moving from the house in a few years, and thus I am not going to buy an awesome blue star).

Cheers, and happy cooking!

Matt

Aug 12, 2007
mattwright in Cookware

Easy, quick DELICIOUS mussels for tonight

For mussels, I normally do one of two things:

Tyme, white wine, shallot. steam open mussels and add some parsley. Something amazing about white wine and shallots cooking. Some add butter, I don't.

The other would be a thai curry broth, which works well with mussels, but takes much longer to prepare.

Jul 26, 2007
mattwright in Home Cooking

British Cooking Recipes: let's hear 'em...

As a brit living in the pacific northwest, I have a few.. My all time favorite is summer pudding. A classic desert - here is how it works:

Get a pudding bowl. Not too big. Something about the size you would have your breakfast cereal in. You want to make sure it is as tall as it is wide.

Generously butter the bowl interior. Take some really good, slightly stale white bread, and line the inside of the bowl with it. Get creative with a knife. You want no holes!

In a saucepan over a medium/low heat stew some blackberries, raspberries, blueberries with a couple of tablespoons of sugar, until the juice starts coming out of the fruit.

Pour all this into the bread bowl. Make a bread lid for the bowl. Put a plate over the top of the bowl, and a heavy weight on the top of the plate, to help compress everything together. About 5lb's should do the trick. Bung it in the fridge overnight.

To serve - turn the bowl over (opening facing down on a plate), tap the bowl. Gentle shake it. Let the pudding slide out. Cut into slices, and serve.

Bloody delicious!!

Other than that. Delia Smith has the classics. Jamie Oliver does some classics with a spin. Updated if you will for a more modern taste.

Jul 26, 2007
mattwright in Home Cooking